Kaki Ae language

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Kaki Ae
Tate
RegionNew Guinea
Ethnicityspoken by 40% (no date)[1]
Native speakers
630 (2004)[2]
Language codes
ISO 639-3tbd
Glottologkaki1249[3]

Kaki Ae, or Tate, is a language with about 500 speakers, half the ethnic population, near Kerema, in Papua New Guinea.

Classification[edit]

Kaki Ae has been proposed to be related to the Eleman languages, but the connections appear to be loans.[3] Søren Wichmann (2013)[4] tentatively considers it to be a separate, independent group. Pawley and Hammarström (2018) treat Kaki Ae as a language isolate due to low cognacy rates with Eleman, and consider the few similarities shared with Eleman to be due to borrowed loanwords.[5]

Distribution[edit]

Kaki Ae is spoken in Auri, Kupiano, Kupla (7°59′26″S 145°47′27″E / 7.990545°S 145.790882°E / -7.990545; 145.790882 (Kupola Settlement)), Lou (8°00′58″S 145°48′48″E / 8.015988°S 145.813268°E / -8.015988; 145.813268 (Lou)), Ovorio (7°59′14″S 145°48′34″E / 7.987255°S 145.809446°E / -7.987255; 145.809446 (Ovorio)), and Uriri (7°58′42″S 145°47′41″E / 7.978345°S 145.794638°E / -7.978345; 145.794638 (Uriri)) villages in Central Kerema Rural LLG, Gulf Province.[6][7]

Pronouns[edit]

The Kaki Ae pronouns are:

sg pl
1 nao nu'u
2 ao ofe
3 era era-he

Phonology[edit]

Kaki Ae has no distinction between /t/ and /k/. (The forms kaki and tate of the name both derive from the rather pejorative Toaripi name for the people, Tati.)

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kaki Ae language at Ethnologue (15th ed., 2005)
  2. ^ Kaki Ae at Ethnologue (18th ed., 2015)
  3. ^ a b Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2017). "Kaki Ae". Glottolog 3.0. Jena, Germany: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History.
  4. ^ Wichmann, Søren. 2013. A classification of Papuan languages. In: Hammarström, Harald and Wilco van den Heuvel (eds.), History, contact and classification of Papuan languages (Language and Linguistics in Melanesia, Special Issue 2012), 313-386. Port Moresby: Linguistic Society of Papua New Guinea.
  5. ^ Pawley, Andrew; Hammarström, Harald (2018). "The Trans New Guinea family". In Palmer, Bill (ed.). The Languages and Linguistics of the New Guinea Area: A Comprehensive Guide. The World of Linguistics. 4. Berlin: De Gruyter Mouton. pp. 21–196. ISBN 978-3-11-028642-7.
  6. ^ Eberhard, David M.; Simons, Gary F.; Fennig, Charles D., eds. (2019). "Papua New Guinea languages". Ethnologue: Languages of the World (22nd ed.). Dallas: SIL International.
  7. ^ United Nations in Papua New Guinea (2018). "Papua New Guinea Village Coordinates Lookup". Humanitarian Data Exchange. 1.31.9.