Kamloops (electoral district)

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For the former provincial electoral district, see Kamloops (provincial electoral district).
Kamloops
British Columbia electoral district
Defunct federal electoral district
Legislature House of Commons
District created 1988
District abolished 2004
First contested 1988
Last contested 2000

Kamloops was a federal electoral district in British Columbia, Canada, that was represented in the Canadian House of Commons from 1935 to 1968, and from 1988 to 2004. From 1998 to 2004, it was known as Kamloops, Thompson and Highland Valleys.

History[edit]

This riding was created in 1935 from parts of Cariboo and Kootenay West ridings. It was abolished in 1966 when it was redistributed into Coast Chilcotin, Fraser Valley East, Kamloops—Cariboo, Okanagan—Kootenay and Prince George—Peace River ridings.

In 1987, a new Kamloops riding was created from parts of Kamloops—Shuswap riding. In 1998, it was renamed "Kamloops, Thompson and Highland Valleys".

It consisted of:

  • Electoral Areas A, B, J, L, O and P of the Thompson-Nicola Regional District;
  • The City of Kamloops;
  • the Village of Chase; and
  • the District Municipality of Logan Lake.

It was redefined in 1996 to consist of:

  • Subdivisions A, B and E of Thompson-Nicola Regional District, including Skeetchestn Indian Reserve and Logan Lake District Municipality, excepting Spatsum Indian Reserve No. 11;
  • the City of Kamloops; and
  • Kamloops Indian Reserve No. 1.

In 2003, the riding was abolished, and a new riding, "Kamloops—Thompson", was created with substantially the same boundaries. In 2005, this district was renamed "Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo".

Members of Parliament[edit]

This riding elected the following Members of Parliament:

Parliament Years Member Party
Kamloops
Riding created from Cariboo and Kootenay West
18th  1935–1940     Thomas O'Neill Liberal
19th  1940–1945
20th  1945–1949     Davie Fulton Progressive Conservative
21st  1949–1953
22nd  1953–1957
23rd  1957–1958
24th  1958–1962
25th  1962–1963
26th  1963–1965     Charles Willoughby Progressive Conservative
27th  1965–1968     Davie Fulton Progressive Conservative
Riding dissolved into Coast Chilcotin, Fraser Valley East, Kamloops—Cariboo,
Okanagan—Kootenay and Prince George—Peace River
Riding re-created from Kamloops—Shuswap
34th  1988–1993     Nelson Riis New Democratic
35th  1993–1997
36th  1997–2000
Kamloops, Thompson and Highland Valleys
37th  2000–2004     Betty Hinton Alliance
Riding dissolved into Kamloops—Thompson

Election results[edit]

Kamloops, Thompson and Highland Valleys, 1998–2003[edit]

Canadian federal election, 2000
Party Candidate Votes % ∆% Expenditures
Alliance Betty Hinton 23,577 48.59 +19.70 $52,370
New Democratic Nelson Riis 13,600 28.02 -8.04 $52,389
Liberal Jon Moser 7,582 15.62 -16.21 $58,449
Progressive Conservative Randy Patch 3,217 6.63 +4.40 $18,401
Canadian Action Ernie Schmidt 544 1.12 $2,180
Total valid votes 48,520 100.0  
Total rejected ballots 117 0.24
Turnout 48,637 67.38
Alliance gain from New Democratic Swing +13.87
Change for the Canadian Alliance is based on the Reform Party.

Kamloops, 1987–1998[edit]

Canadian federal election, 1997
Party Candidate Votes % ∆% Expenditures
New Democratic Nelson Riis 16,138 36.06 -0.56 $52,988
Liberal Joel Groves 14,244 31.83 +7.61 $58,887
Reform Fred Bosman 12,928 28.89 +2.46 $45,611
Progressive Conservative Don Cameron 999 2.23 -6.27 $13,522
Green Donald Stuart Rennie 437 0.97
Total valid votes 44,746 100.0  
Total rejected ballots 126 0.28
Turnout 44,872 67.32
New Democratic hold Swing -4.08
Canadian federal election, 1993
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
New Democratic Nelson Riis 15,182 36.62 -15.68
Reform Keith Raddatz 10,957 26.43 +25.27
Liberal Kevin Krueger 10,040 24.22 +11.06
Progressive Conservative Frank Coldicott 3,526 8.50 -23.90
National Kathrine Wunderlich 1,398 3.37
Libertarian Randall Edge 152 0.37
Natural Law Mark McCooey 122 0.29
Canada Party Marion Munday 43 0.10
Independent Thomas Brown 40 0.10
Total valid votes 41,460 100.0  
New Democratic hold Swing -20.48
Canadian federal election, 1988
Party Candidate Votes %
New Democratic Nelson Riis 21,513 52.30
Progressive Conservative Russ Cundari 13,328 32.40
Liberal Gus Halliday 5,412 13.16
Reform Ted Maskell 477 1.16
Green Trudy M. Frisk 263 0.64
Communist Valerie Adrienne Carey 77 0.19
Independent Carl A. Grant 67 0.16
Total valid votes 41,137 100.0  
This riding was created from parts of Kamloops—Shuswap, with New Democrat Nelson Riis being the incumbent.

Kamloops, 1933–1966[edit]

Canadian federal election, 1965
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Progressive Conservative Davie Fulton 11,731 37.39 +7.94
New Democratic Vernor Wilfred Jones 7,132 22.73 -0.75
Liberal Albert John Edward Chilton 6,757 21.54 -7.07
Social Credit Thomas Daly Sills 5,756 18.35 -0.11
Total valid votes 31,376 100.0  
Progressive Conservative hold Swing +4.34
Canadian federal election, 1963
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Progressive Conservative Charles Willoughby 8,604 29.45 -13.68
Liberal Jarl Whist 8,359 28.61 +6.54
New Democratic Vernor W. Jones 6,860 23.48 +5.43
Social Credit Clarence A. Wright 5,394 18.46 +1.71
Total valid votes 29,217 100.0  
Progressive Conservative hold Swing -10.11
Canadian federal election, 1962
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Progressive Conservative Davie Fulton 11,312 43.13 -20.70
Liberal Jarl Whist 5,789 22.07 +8.86
New Democratic Walter D. Inglis 4,733 18.05 +5.26
Social Credit Clarence Aubrey Wright 4,393 16.75 +5.74
Total valid votes 26,227 100.0  
Progressive Conservative hold Swing -14.78
Change for the New Democrats is based on the Co-operative Commonwealth.
Canadian federal election, 1958
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Progressive Conservative Davie Fulton 13,858 63.83 +16.59
Liberal Arnold McIntyre Affleck 2,868 13.21 -2.73
Co-operative Commonwealth Austin Kenneth Greenway 2,777 12.79 +3.56
Social Credit Earl Victor Roy Merrick 2,390 11.01 -16.58
Total valid votes 21,711 100.0  
Progressive Conservative hold Swing +9.66
Canadian federal election, 1957
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Progressive Conservative Davie Fulton 10,029 47.24 +0.55
Social Credit Walter James Smith 5,858 27.59 +4.30
Liberal Arnold McIntyre Affleck 3,383 15.94 -0.89
Co-operative Commonwealth Austin Kenneth Greenway 1,959 9.23 -3.96
Total valid votes 21,229 100.0  
Progressive Conservative hold Swing -1.88
Canadian federal election, 1953
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Progressive Conservative Davie Fulton 7,578 46.69 +5.92
Social Credit Clarence Aubrey Wright 3,780 23.29
Liberal Kenneth Durward Houghton 2,731 16.83 -16.55
Co-operative Commonwealth Austin Kenneth Greenway 2,140 13.19 -13.36
Total valid votes 16,229 100.0  
Progressive Conservative hold Swing -8.68
Canadian federal election, 1949
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Progressive Conservative Davie Fulton 7,682 40.07 +6.98
Liberal Thomas James O'Neill 6,399 33.38 +1.58
Co-operative Commonwealth George Victor Larson 5,091 26.55 -3.55
Total valid votes 19,172 100.0  
Progressive Conservative hold Swing +2.70
Canadian federal election, 1945
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Progressive Conservative Davie Fulton 4,401 33.09 +1.19
Liberal Thomas James O'Neill 4,229 31.80 -9.99
Co-operative Commonwealth Francis James McKenzie 4,003 30.10 +3.79
Labor–Progressive John Henry Codd 666 5.01
Total valid votes 13,299 100.0  
Progressive Conservative gain from Liberal Swing +5.59
Canadian federal election, 1940
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Liberal Thomas James O'Neill 5,621 41.79 +4.27
National Government Henry Herbert Stevens 4,290 31.90 +5.27
Co-operative Commonwealth Margaret MacNab 3,538 26.31 +0.16
Total valid votes 13,449 100.0  
Liberal hold Swing -0.50
Canadian federal election, 1935
Party Candidate Votes %
Liberal Thomas James O'Neill 4,190 37.52
Conservative William James Moffatt 2,974 26.63
Co-operative Commonwealth George Faulds Stirling 2,920 26.15
Reconstruction George Henry Ellis 1,084 9.71
Total valid votes 11,168 100.0  
This riding was created from Cariboo and Kootenay West, both of which elected a Conservative in the last election.

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

Riding history from the Library of Parliament: