Kanpyō (food)

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Kanpyo, (dried gourd strips)
Kanpyō (raw), dried shavings of "Lagenaria siceraria" var. "hispida
Kanpyō (raw), dried shavings of Lagenaria siceraria var. hispida
Nutritional value per 100 g
Energy1,079 kJ (258 kcal)
65.03 g
Dietary fiber9.8 g
0.56 g
Saturated0.045 g
Trans0
Monounsaturated0.103 g
Polyunsaturated0.244 g
8.58 g
VitaminsQuantity %DV
Vitamin A0 IU
Thiamine (B1)
0%
0 mg
Riboflavin (B2)
4%
0.044 mg
Niacin (B3)
19%
2.9 mg
Pantothenic acid (B5)
51%
2.553 mg
Vitamin B6
41%
0.532 mg
Folate (B9)
15%
61 μg
Vitamin B12
0%
0 μg
Vitamin C
0%
0.2 mg
Vitamin D
0%
0 IU
MineralsQuantity %DV
Calcium
28%
280 mg
Copper
22%
0.433 mg
Iron
39%
5.12 mg
Magnesium
35%
125 mg
Manganese
54%
1.137 mg
Phosphorus
27%
188 mg
Potassium
34%
1582 mg
Selenium
4%
2.6 μg
Sodium
1%
15 mg
Zinc
62%
5.86 mg
Other constituentsQuantity
Water19.97 g
Alcohol (ethanol)0
Caffeine0
Cholesterol0

"USDA Database entry for Kanpyo, (dried gourd strips)".
Percentages are roughly approximated using US recommendations for adults.
Source: USDA Nutrient Database

Kanpyō (かんぴょう or 干瓢), sometimes romanized and pronounced kampyō, are dried shavings of Lagenaria siceraria var. hispida, a variety of calabash gourd. The gourd is known as yugao or fukube in Japanese.[1] Kanpyō is an ingredient in traditional Edo style Japanese cuisine. Cooked and flavored kanpyō is commonly used in futomaki sushi roll.[1]

Kanpyō was originally grown in the Osaka region.[citation needed] Now it is a specialty product of Tochigi Prefecture,[2] where it is a cottage industry.[1] The region is so tied to the food product that it hosts the "Kanpyō Highway with History and Romance".[3] The yuru-chara for Oyama, Tochigi is Kapyomaru (かぴょ丸, an anthropomorphized calabash.[3]

The gourd is harvested between late July and September. The white flesh of the gourd is cut into strips 3 cm wide and 3 mm thick, then either dried in the sun or dehydrated.[4]‹See TfM›[failed verification] Over 200 tons a year of dried kanpyō are produced per year.[1] Kanpyō available in the United States is sometimes chemically bleach-dried to a very white color, as opposed to the creamy color of the naturally-dried kind.[2] Sulfur dioxide is used sometimes used as a fumigant but must not be used in concentrations exceeding 5.0 g per 1 kg of dry matter.[5]

Dishes featuring kanpyō[edit]

The traditional new year dish kombu-maki tied with strips of kanpyō

In addition to being the focus of many dishes, kanpyō strips are frequently used as an edible twist tie in dishes such as fukusa-zushi and chakin-zushi.[1] Typically the dried strips are boiled to soften, and then boiled a second time with soy sauce, sugar, and other ingredients added for flavor.[1][6]

Kanpyō-maki rolls

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i Lowry, Dave (2005). The Connoisseur's Guide to Sushi: Everything You Need to Know about Sushi Varieties and Accompaniments, Etiquette and Dining Tips, and More. Harvard Common Press. ISBN 9781558323070. OCLC 962114405. Retrieved 3 July 2019.
  2. ^ a b c Homma, Gaku (1991). The Folk Art of Japanese Country Cooking: A Traditional Diet for Today's World. Translated by Busch, Emily. North Atlantic Books. pp. 80–81. ISBN 9781556430985. OCLC 22623869.
  3. ^ a b "祝!「歴史とロマンのかんぴょう街道」開通" [Congratulation! "History and romance Kanpyō Highway" opened] (html). Mibu Town Tochigi (in Japanese). 321-0292 栃木県下都賀郡壬生町通町12番22号. 2 March 2011. Retrieved 8 July 2019.CS1 maint: location (link)
  4. ^ "かんぴょう" [Kanpyō]. Nihon Daihyakka Zensho (Nipponika) (in Japanese). Tokyo: Shogakukan. 2012. OCLC 153301537. Archived from the original on 2007-08-25. Retrieved 2012-06-07.
  5. ^ "食品添加物の指定、使用基準の改正等について" [About designation of food additive, revision of use standard] (html). 厚生労働省 (in Japanese). 20 January 2004. Retrieved 3 July 2019.
  6. ^ a b Kawasumi, Ken (2001). The Encyclopedia of Sushi Rolls. Translated by Driussi, Laura. Japan Publications Trading. ISBN 9784889960761. OCLC 921930235. Retrieved 3 July 2019.