Kanturk

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Kanturk

Ceann Toirc
Town
Kanturk Castle
Kanturk Castle
Kanturk is located in Ireland
Kanturk
Kanturk
Location in Ireland
Coordinates: 52°10′30″N 8°54′0″W / 52.17500°N 8.90000°W / 52.17500; -8.90000
CountryIreland
ProvinceMunster
CountyCounty Cork
Population
 (2016)[1]
2,350
Time zoneUTC+0 (WET)
 • Summer (DST)UTC-1 (IST (WEST))

Kanturk (Irish: Ceann Toirc, meaning "boar's head")[2][3] is a town in the north west of County Cork, Ireland. It is situated at the confluence of the Allua (Allow) and Dallow (Dalua) rivers,[4] which stream further on as tributaries to the River Blackwater. It is about 50 kilometres (31 miles) from Cork, Blarney and Limerick, and lies just north of the main N72 road, 15 km (9 miles) from Mallow and about 40 km (25 miles) from Killarney. Kanturk is within the Cork North-West Dáil constituency.

History[edit]

A historic site close to the town is Kanturk Castle, known locally as the Old Court.[5] This fortified house was built in c. 1601 for MacDonogh McCarthy as a defence against English settlers during the Plantation of Ireland.[6][7] The building was a limestone rubble Tudor mansion four storeys high, 28 metres in length and 11 metres wide, with four towers of five storeys high and a height of 29 metres. The castle was never fully completed.[8][4] Work stopped c. 1618, reputedly because local English settlers were concerned that the structure was too large and fortified, and could be used as a base to attack them.[9] Accordingly, the Privy Council in England ordered that building works be stopped. After changing hands several times in the intervening centuries, Kanturk Castle is now owned by An Taisce (the National Trust for Ireland),[10] and is a designated National Monument.[8]

A number of the town's bridges date to the late 18th and early 19th centuries.[11][12] The larger religious and administrative buildings in Kanturk date to the early to mid-19th century, including the former market house (1810),[13] court house (1825),[14] Church of Ireland church (1858),[15] and Roman Catholic church (1867).[16]

Economy and amenities[edit]

The local creamery, North Cork Creameries, was founded in 1928 and produces casein powder and other milk products.[17][18] Kanturk's former knitwear facility now produces concrete flooring products.[citation needed]

The "Unity Stone", in Kanturk Unity Park has an inscription and a notice indicating that the park was opened by then President Mary McAleese on 7 July 1998

Kanturk's library offers lending facilities, newspapers, reference books, internet access and also organises cultural events.[19][20]

Kanturk Town Park is a short distance from the town shopping centre. The "Unity Stone" monument is located near the park's entrance. The park has oak, beech, chestnut and ash trees, a children's playground, some cultural exhibits, and a walkway by the banks of the Dalua.[citation needed]

The town's schools include a number of national (primary) schools and two co-educational secondary schools. The secondary schools, Coláiste Treasa and Scoil Mhuire, have enrollments of over 500 and 270 students respectively.[21][22]

Sport[edit]

Kanturk GAA club has a hurling team and a football team, both men's and women's from underage to Intermediate level. The local pitch is located in Kilroe, just outside the town. Kanturk RFC is a rugby union club which is also located just outside the town, at Knocknacolan. Founded in 1927, the club play in the All-Ireland League. An eighteen-hole golf course is located on the Mill Road, where milling used to take place. The local association football soccer pitch has facilities to accommodate a number of teams. Kanturk also has a cycling club with its own outdoor 250m velodrome, one of only three on the island of Ireland.[23]

Kanturk has a trout fishing club which maintains the rivers that flow through the town. From Newmarket, the Dalua river flows into the Allow (Freemount River) in the centre of the town. A further 2 km (1 mile) south of the town the river Brogeen flows into the Allow. The Allow joins the River Blackwater; known for its salmon fishing, a further 3 km (2 mi) downstream at Leaders Bridge on the N72 Mallow to Killarney road. The Kanturk Trout Anglers Association has been represented on the international stage on several occasions, with past members participating at the World Fly Fishing Championships.[24][25]

Transport[edit]

By rail, Kanturk is served by the nearby Banteer railway station, which is 6 km (4 mi) from Kanturk. The town's one-time railway station opened on 1 April 1889, closed for passenger traffic on 27 January 1947 and finally closed altogether on 4 February 1963.[31]

Bus routes serving Kanturk include weekday services to Mallow, one of which continues to Cork. On Saturdays, there is a single bus service to Cork via Mallow. Kanturk is not served by bus on Sundays.

Kanturk is 51 km (32 mi) from Kerry Airport and a little over 60 km (37 mi) from Cork Airport.

People[edit]

Thady Kelleher, International Champion Ploughman from Duhallow

People of note from the area include:

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "Census 2016 Sapmap Area - Settlements - Kanturk". CSO. 2016. Retrieved 18 August 2018.
  2. ^ "Ceann Toirc / Kanturk". logainm.ie. Irish Placenames Database. Retrieved 27 October 2020.
  3. ^ Joyce, Patrick Weston (1869). The origin and history of Irish names of places, Volume 1. Dublin: McGlashan & Gill. p. 429. Kanturk, in Cork, is written by the Four Masters, Ceann-tuirc, the head or hill of the boar
  4. ^ a b c Lewis, Samuel (1837). "Kanturk". A Topographical Dictionary of Ireland. Dublin.
  5. ^ "The Old Court: The Story of Kanturk Castle". Archived from the original on 2 January 2017. Retrieved 28 November 2015.
  6. ^ "Learning Zone - Primary School Students - Looking at Places - Kanturk Castle". askaboutireland.ie.
  7. ^ "Historic Kanturk - An Overview". kanturk.ie. Archived from the original on 4 November 2017.
  8. ^ a b Heritage Castles of County Cork (PDF) (Report). Cork County Council. 2017. pp. 138–139.
  9. ^ "An Abandoned Project". theirishaesthete.com. 7 December 2015. Retrieved 28 October 2020.
  10. ^ "Our Work - Properties - Kanturk Castle, Co. Cork". antaisce.org. An Taisce. Retrieved 28 October 2020.
  11. ^ "Kanturk Bridge, William O'Brien Street, Main Street, Kanturk, County Cork". buildingsofireland.ie. National Inventory of Architectural Heritage. Retrieved 27 October 2020.
  12. ^ "Brogeen Bridge, Kanturk, County Cork". buildingsofireland.ie. National Inventory of Architectural Heritage. Retrieved 27 October 2020.
  13. ^ "Kanturk Credit Union, Strand Street, Kanturk, County Cork". buildingsofireland.ie. National Inventory of Architectural Heritage. Retrieved 27 October 2020.
  14. ^ "Court House, Church Street, Kanturk, County Cork". buildingsofireland.ie. National Inventory of Architectural Heritage. Retrieved 27 October 2020.
  15. ^ "Saint Peter's Church, Freemount Road, Egmont Place, Kanturk, County Cork". buildingsofireland.ie. National Inventory of Architectural Heritage. Retrieved 27 October 2020.
  16. ^ "Church of the Immaculate Conception, Church Street, Kanturk, County Cork". buildingsofireland.ie. National Inventory of Architectural Heritage. Retrieved 27 October 2020.
  17. ^ "It truly is dairy gold for North Cork Creameries". The Corkman. Independent News & Media. 2 November 2019. Retrieved 27 October 2020.
  18. ^ "North Cork Creameries reveal details of merger with co-op". The Corkman. Independent News & Media. 10 February 2018. Retrieved 27 October 2020.
  19. ^ "Kanturk Library Homepage". Archived from the original on 14 November 2016. Retrieved 13 February 2020.
  20. ^ "Permanent library for Kanturk after three-year delay". irishexaminer.com. Irish Examiner. 11 September 2020. Retrieved 27 October 2020.
  21. ^ "Whole School Evaluation Report - Coláiste Treasa, Kanturk, County Cork" (PDF). education.ie. Department of Education. 8 May 2014. Retrieved 27 October 2020.
  22. ^ "Whole School Evaluation Report - Scoil Mhuire, Kanturk, Co Cork" (PDF). education.ie. Department of Education. 7 December 2012. Retrieved 27 October 2020.
  23. ^ "Our 'drome of dreams". The Corkman. Independent News & Media. 23 September 2012. Retrieved 27 October 2020. There are two other tracks in Ireland, one which is in Dublin and which is 440 metres and the other is in Belfast
  24. ^ "Michael hooks a bronze beauty at world c'ships in South Africa". The Corkman. Independent News & Media. 2 March 2019. Retrieved 27 October 2020.
  25. ^ "Kanturk man to join Irish team for World C'ships". The Corkman. Independent News & Media. 16 September 2000. Retrieved 27 October 2020.
  26. ^ Census for post 1821 figures.
  27. ^ "histpop.org". Archived from the original on 7 May 2016. Retrieved 13 February 2020.
  28. ^ "nisranew.nisra.gov.uk". Archived from the original on 17 February 2012. Retrieved 28 January 2010.
  29. ^ Lee, JJ (1981). "On the accuracy of the Pre-famine Irish censuses". In Goldstrom, J. M.; Clarkson, L. A. (eds.). Irish Population, Economy, and Society: Essays in Honour of the Late K. H. Connell. Oxford, England: Clarendon Press.
  30. ^ Mokyr, Joel; O Grada, Cormac (November 1984). "New Developments in Irish Population History, 1700–1850". The Economic History Review. Volume. 37 (4): 473–488. doi:10.1111/j.1468-0289.1984.tb00344.x. hdl:10197/1406. Archived from the original on 4 December 2012.
  31. ^ "Kanturk station" (PDF). Railscot – Irish Railways. Retrieved 16 October 2007.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 52°10′30″N 8°54′0″W / 52.17500°N 8.90000°W / 52.17500; -8.90000