Kaoru Hasuike

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Kaoru Hasuike (蓮池 薫 Hasuike Kaoru?, born September 29, 1957) is a Japanese citizen who was abducted by North Korean spies along with his girlfriend Yukiko Okudo. They were abducted from their hometown of Kashiwazaki in Niigata prefecture on July 19, 1978. Hasuike was a law student at the time. During their captivity, in May 1980, Hasuike and Okudo were married. They had two children – a daughter and a son. On October 15, 2002, the North Korean government allowed Hasuike, Okudo and other victims to leave North Korea to visit Japan. Once there, Hasuike and Okudo made the decision to remain in Japan and to plead for the release of their children which was eventually allowed in 2004.[1][2]

After his escape, Haisuke wrote a book, Abduction and My Decision, about his experiences in North Korea.

In April 2013, Hasuike was appointed Associate Professor of economics at the Kashiwazaki-based Niigata Sangyo University, where he has taught since 2008. In addition, Hasuike runs a translation business.[3]

His story and that of his brother Toru were adapted for a manga.[4][5][6][7][8]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ =Wallace, Rick (26 December 2012). "North Korean nightmare: a Japanese couple's remarkable journey". The Australian. Retrieved 8 April 2014. 
  2. ^ Kirby, Michael Donald; Biserko, Sonja; Darusman, Marzuki (7 February 2014). "Report of the detailed findings of the commission of inquiry on human rights in the Democratic People's Republic of Korea - A/HRC/25/CRP.1". United Nations Human Rights Council: 298 (Paragraph 938). Archived from the original on Feb 27, 2014. Mrs and Mr Hasuike were abducted from the coast of Kashiwazaki in Niigata Prefecture, Japan. Mrs and Mr Hasuike were two of the five abductees returned to Japan in 2002, and their children in 2004. In 2006 and 2007, the Japanese authorities issued arrest warrants for three DPRK agents believed to be associated with the couples’ abduction: Choi Sun-chol, Han Myeong-il and Kim Nam-jin. 
  3. ^ "Ex-abductees mark 11th anniversary of return from N. Korea". The Japan Times. October 16, 2013. Retrieved 8 April 2014. 
  4. ^ "Ex-abductee Hasuike determined to help settle abduction issue- 毎日jp(毎日新聞)". Mainichi.jp. 2012-10-15. Retrieved 2012-10-19. 
  5. ^ "Ex-abductee opens up on years in North Korea". News.asiaone.com. 2002-10-15. Retrieved 2012-10-19. 
  6. ^ "10 years after, former abductees still trying to erase the horrors of North Korea – AJW by The Asahi Shimbun". Ajw.asahi.com. Retrieved 2012-10-19. 
  7. ^ The Yomiuri Shimbun. "10 years on, ex-abductees call for action : National : DAILY YOMIURI ONLINE (The Daily Yomiuri)". Yomiuri.co.jp. Retrieved 2012-10-19. 
  8. ^ "Japan abductee' kin: DPRK sanctions a failure – World News". SINA English. Retrieved 2012-10-19.