Karate in Japan

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Karate in Japan
CountryJapan
Governing bodyJapan Karate Federation
National team(s)Japan Olympics team
International competitions

Karate began in the 14th century on the island of Okinawa.[1] Karate as a word first emerged due to Gichin Funakoshi.[2]

Karate was introduced to mainland Japan in the 1920s.[3][4][5]

History[edit]

Karate (lit. "empty-hand") has its roots in ancient martial practice in India and China. There is a popular tale of an Indian monk by the name of Bodhidharma, who brought a system of exercise and fighting techniques to the Shaolin Monastery in China around 525 A.D. It is said that this was the beginning of a systematized martial practice that eventually spread to other Asian countries via traveling monks and traders.

Karate itself was born in Okinawa (actually a string of islands off the coast of Japan known as the Ryukyu Islands).[6] It is said that in ancient times a style known simply as "te" (literally "hand") emerged from the influence of the aforementioned Shaolin Kung Fu. In the 1920s a public school teacher named Gichin Funakoshi introduced what was, by then, called kara-te into mainland Japan.

There were already family styles of karate in Okinawa and soon several styles were also formed in Japan. There are several differences between the two traditional approaches but that can be researched elsewhere.[7]

Establishing organizations[edit]

Organizations like Japan Karate Association and the Japan Karate Federation emerged in the 1950s to standardize karate as a sport.[8][9][10][11]

National board[edit]

Japan Karate Federation is the largest Karate Association in Japan. Its is a member of the Japan Olympic Association.

The Japan Karate Federation is a member of the Asian umbrella organization Asian Karatedo Federation (AKF) as well as the World Association for World Karate Federation (WKF).

On the part of the Japan Olympic Committee, the JOC is the only Karate Association authorized to send athletes to the Olympic Games.

International competition[edit]

Japan a traditional world power in Sport Karate and its record in Karate World Championships is an impressive one.

Karate World Championships[edit]

Year Host city Gold Silver Bronze Total
1970 Japan Tokyo 2 1 1 4
1972 France Paris 0 0 0 0
1975 United States California 1 2 0 3
1977 Japan Tokyo 0 0 0 0
1980 Spain Madrid 4 4 2 10
1982 Taiwan Taipei 6 2 3 11
1984 Netherlands Maastricht 3 2 2 7
1986 Australia Sydney 0 0 1 1
1988 Egypt Cairo 5 7 2 14
1990 Mexico Mexico City 6 3 3 12
1992 Spain Granada 4 2 3 9
1994 Malaysia Kota Kinabalu 7 2 2 11
1996 South Africa Sun City 4 4 3 11
1998 Brazil Rio de Janeiro 5 1 2 8
Total 73 43 42 158

Spreading the martial art[edit]

As Karate grained prominence in Japan many karate masters exported the martial art to the United States and many other parts of the world.[12][13]

Present[edit]

The sport has declined in popularity and is more popular abroad.[14] Karate at the 2020 Summer Olympics is going to be a debut event at the Summer Olympics.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Global Allure of Karate". Retrieved 31 December 2017.
  2. ^ Grupp, Joachim (26 July 2017). "Shotokan Karate Kata". Meyer & Meyer Verlag – via Google Books.
  3. ^ Inc, Active Interest Media (1 December 1986). "Black Belt". Active Interest Media, Inc. Retrieved 26 July 2017 – via Google Books.
  4. ^ Grupp, Joachim (26 July 2017). "Shotokan Karate Kata". Meyer & Meyer Verlag. Retrieved 26 July 2017 – via Google Books.
  5. ^ Martin, Ashley (5 May 2016). "The Shotokan Karate Bible: Beginner to Black Belt". Bloomsbury Publishing PLC. Retrieved 27 July 2017 – via Google Books.
  6. ^ Orr, Monty; Amae, Yoshihisa (December 2016). "Karate in Taiwan and South Korea: A Tale of Two Postcolonial Societies" (PDF). Taiwan in Comparative Perspective. Taiwan Research Programme, London School of Economics. 6: 1–16. ISSN 1752-7732.
  7. ^ "The Global Allure of Karate". 2 January 2017. Retrieved 8 March 2018.
  8. ^ Inc, Active Interest Media (1 August 1967). "Black Belt". Active Interest Media, Inc. Retrieved 26 July 2017 – via Google Books.
  9. ^ Inc, Active Interest Media (1 November 1970). "Black Belt". Active Interest Media, Inc. Retrieved 26 July 2017 – via Google Books.
  10. ^ Inc, Active Interest Media (1 October 1965). "Black Belt". Active Interest Media, Inc. Retrieved 26 July 2017 – via Google Books.
  11. ^ Arriaza, Rafael. "Chapter 16: Karate". In Kordi, Ramin; Maffulli, Nicola; Wroble, Randall R.; et al. (eds.). Combat Sports Medicine. p. 288. Retrieved 8 December 2017.
  12. ^ HILL, Robert (8 September 2010). "World of Martial Arts !". Lulu.com. Retrieved 26 July 2017 – via Google Books.
  13. ^ "The Martial Arts as Moneymakers". The New York Times. 28 August 1988. Retrieved 26 July 2017.
  14. ^ "Europeans keep karate alive and kicking in Japan". 11 April 2007. Retrieved 26 July 2017 – via Reuters.

External links[edit]