Karen L. Henderson

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Karen LeCraft Henderson
Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit
Assumed office
July 5, 1990
Appointed byGeorge H. W. Bush
Preceded byKen Starr
Judge of the United States District Court for the District of South Carolina
In office
June 16, 1986 – July 11, 1990
Appointed byRonald Reagan
Preceded byWilliam Walter Wilkins
Succeeded byDennis Shedd
Personal details
Born (1944-06-11) June 11, 1944 (age 75)
Oberlin, Ohio
EducationDuke University (B.A.)
University of North Carolina School of Law (J.D.)

Karen LeCraft Henderson (born July 11, 1944) is a United States Circuit Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit and a former United States District Judge of the United States District Court for the District of South Carolina.

Early life, education, and career[edit]

Born and raised in Oberlin, Ohio, Henderson received a Bachelor of Arts degree from Duke University in 1966 and a Juris Doctor from the University of North Carolina School of Law in 1969. Henderson then entered private practice in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. From 1973 to 1983, she was with the Office of the South Carolina Attorney General, ultimately in the position of Deputy Attorney General. In 1983, she returned to private practice as a member of the firm of Sinkler, Gibbs & Simons of Charleston and Columbia, South Carolina.[1]

Federal judicial service[edit]

On June 3, 1986, Henderson was nominated by President Ronald Reagan to a seat on the United States District Court for the District of South Carolina vacated by Judge William Walter Wilkins. She was confirmed by the United States Senate on June 13, 1986, and received her commission on June 16, 1986. Her service terminated on July 11, 1990, due to elevation to the District of Columbia Circuit.[1]

On May 8, 1990, President George H. W. Bush nominated Henderson to a seat on the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit that had been vacated by the resignation of Kenneth Starr to become Solicitor General of the United States. The Senate confirmed Henderson on June 28, 1990 by unanimous consent, and she received her commission on July 5, 1990.[1]

Religious Freedom Restoration Act[edit]

In 2008, Henderson, ruled that the Religious Freedom Restoration Act, a statute that applies by its terms to all "persons" did not apply to detainees at Guantánamo.[2]

Second Amendment[edit]

In Parker, et al. v. District of Columbia (2007) Henderson authored a dissent in which she wrote "the right of the people to keep and bear arms relates to those Militia whose continued vitality is required to safeguard the individual States."[3] She also wrote that "the Constitution, case law and applicable statutes all establish that the District is not a state within the meaning of the Second Amendment".[4]

Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act[edit]

In March 2017, Henderson found that the Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act prevented an Ethiopian dissident living with asylum in the United States from suing the Ethiopian government for infecting his home computer with FinSpy spyware and then surveilling him in Maryland.[5][6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Henderson, Karen LeCraft - Federal Judicial Center". www.fjc.gov.
  2. ^ "Guantanamo detainees are not human beings - US judges".
  3. ^ "D.C.'s Ban On Handguns In Homes Is Thrown Out". www.washingtonpost.com.
  4. ^ The Seat Congress Can't Offer.
  5. ^ Note, Recent Case: D.C. Circuit Finds Ethiopia Immune in Hacking Suit, 131 Harv. L. Rev. 1179 (2018).
  6. ^ Doe v. Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia, 851 F.3d 7 (D.C. Cir. 2017).

Sources[edit]

External links[edit]

Legal offices
Preceded by
William Walter Wilkins
Judge of the United States District Court for the District of South Carolina
1986–1990
Succeeded by
Dennis Shedd
Preceded by
Ken Starr
Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit
1990–present
Incumbent