Karenni National People's Liberation Front

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Karenni National People's Liberation Front
ကရင်နီလူမျိုးပေါင်းစုံ ပြည်သူ့လွတ်မြောက်ရေးတပ်ဦး
Participant in the Internal conflict in Myanmar
Karenni National People's Liberation Front flag.png
Flag of the Karenni National People's Liberation Front
Active1978 (1978)–2009 (2009)
IdeologyKarenni nationalism
Communism[1]
LeadersSandar
Shwe War
HeadquartersMobile headquarters
Area of operationsKayah State
Size4,000[1]
Originated as Karenni Army
AlliesState allies

Non-state allies

Opponent(s)State opponents

Non-state opponents

Battles and war(s)Internal conflict in Myanmar

The Karenni National People's Liberation Front (Burmese: ကရင်နီလူမျိုးပေါင်းစုံ ပြည်သူ့လွတ်မြောက်ရေးတပ်ဦး; abbreviated KNPLF) was an insurgent group that was active in Kayah State, Myanmar (Burma). It became a border guard force on 8 November 2009.[1]

History[edit]

In 1978, a group of communist fighters split from the Karenni Army due to ideological differences, and founded the Karenni National People's Liberation Front (KNPLF). The KNPLF maintained close ties with the Communist Party of Burma (CPB), receiving training, supplies, and armed support from the group until their armed wing's dissolution in 1989.[1]

In 1989, a ceasefire deal was negotiated between the State Law and Order Restoration Council (SLORC) and the KNPLF, which was finalised in 1994.[1] The group had since helped government soldiers combat other armed insurgent groups, most notably the Karenni Army, and on 8 November 2009, the group agreed to transform into a "border guard force".[2]

The KNPLF has been accused of using child soldiers and landmines in the past,[3] with one child soldier named Koo Reh at age 13 saying:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "Karenni National People's Liberation Front".
  2. ^ Murray, Lucy. "Karenni rebels dig in for last stand". Asia Times.
  3. ^ "Geneva Call - Karenni National Peoples Liberation Front (KNPLF)".
  4. ^ "Child Soldiers in Non-State Armed Groups".
  5. ^ Human Rights Watch interview with Koo Reh, July 2007