Karin Booth

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Karin Booth
Karin Booth.jpg
Born
June Francis Hoffman

(1916-06-19)June 19, 1916
Minneapolis, Minnesota, U.S.
DiedJuly 27, 2003(2003-07-27) (aged 87)
OccupationActress
Years active1939–1964
Spouse(s)Allan Pinkerton Carlisle (1948–2003) (2 sons) (her death)
ChildrenAllan (b. 1950)
Robert (b. 1961)[1]

Karin Booth (born June Francis Hoffman,[2] June 19, 1916 – July 27, 2003) was an American film and TV actress of the 1940s to 1960s.

Life and career[edit]

She was born June Francis Hoffman on June 19, 1916, in Minneapolis, Minnesota to Francis T. and Ebba V. Hoffman.[3] She lived in Portland and Los Angeles, attending John Marshall High School.[4] She began her career modeling and being a chorus girl in 1939 and was signed under contract to Paramount Pictures in 1941 under the name Katharine Booth.[3][5] After changing her screen name to Karin Booth in 1942, she would go onto appear in such feature films as The Unfinished Dance (1947), Big City (1948),The Cariboo Trail (1950), Tobor the Great (1955) and The World Was His Jury (1958). She also appeared on television in Alfred Hitchcock Presents, Perry Mason, M Squad, The Lineup, and This Is The Life. She was considered a Joan Crawford look-alike at the start of her career and was often seen courting with Sterling Hayden, John Hodiak, and Mickey Rooney.[3] In 1948, she married Allan Pinkerton Carlisle, a well-known and prominent sportsman from Palm Beach, Florida, and had 2 sons, Allan (born November 3, 1950) and Robert (born May 3, 1961).[3] She was expecting a middle child in 1959 but lost the baby unexpectedly while filming Beloved Infidel.[3] She retired in 1964 and lived the rest of her days in the community of Jupiter, Florida, where she died on July 27, 2003[3] and was cremated[6] with her ashes scattered at sea.

Filmography[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.glamourgirlsofthesilverscreen.com/show/368/Karen+Booth/index.html
  2. ^ "Future Stars?". Star Tribune. June 29, 1947. p. 109. Retrieved October 17, 2017 – via Newspapers.com.
  3. ^ a b c d e f "Karen Booth". Glamour Girls of the Silver Screen. Retrieved October 17, 2017.
  4. ^ a b "Karin Booth to Emerge From Mold of Hollywood". Los Angeles Times. October 13, 1946. p. 43. Retrieved October 17, 2017 – via Newspapers.com.
  5. ^ "Exits and Entrances". Oakland Tribune. May 8, 1941. p. 33. Retrieved October 17, 2017 – via Newspapers.com.
  6. ^ Wilson, Scott (2016). Resting Places: The Burial Sites of More Than 14,000 Famous Persons (3rd ed.). Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland & Company, Inc. pp. 75–76. ISBN 9780786479924.
  7. ^ "Birthday Gift". Harrisburg Telegraph. November 5, 1941. p. 10. Retrieved October 17, 2017 – via Newspapers.com.
  8. ^ "'Louisiana Purchase' Comes to Strand This Week". The Times. 1942. p. 14. Retrieved October 17, 2017 – via Newspapers.com.
  9. ^ "'Big City' Is Sentimental Musical for Family Trade". The Evening News. May 21, 1948. p. 24. Retrieved October 17, 2017 – via Newspapers.com.
  10. ^ "My Foolish Heart". Gasconade County Republican (ad). July 20, 1950. p. 8. Retrieved October 17, 2017 – via Newspapers.com.
  11. ^ "State Penitentiary". Gasconade County Republican. July 20, 1950. p. 8. Retrieved October 17, 2017 – via Newspapers.com.
  12. ^ Starr, Peggy (June 29, 1947). "'Cariboo Trail' Standard Plot". Star Tribune. p. 109. Retrieved October 17, 2017 – via Newspapers.com.
  13. ^ "Sea-Faring Pirate Story at Hollywood". Argus-Leader. November 12, 1950. p. 26. Retrieved October 17, 2017 – via Newspapers.com.
  14. ^ "'Cripple Creek,' the billion-dol". The Courier-Gazette. October 28, 1952. p. 10. Retrieved October 17, 2017 – via Newspapers.com.
  15. ^ "Wyman, Milland in Zany Remake of 'Awful Truth'". The Pantagraph. August 9, 1953. p. 38. Retrieved October 17, 2017 – via Newspapers.com.
  16. ^ "'Sabrina' at Regent; 'Rear Window,' Bijou Film Thriller". Battle Creek Enquirer. November 7, 1954. p. 29. Retrieved October 17, 2017 – via Newspapers.com.
  17. ^ "Jungle Thriller". Orlando Evening Star. May 26, 1954. p. 11. Retrieved October 17, 2017 – via Newspapers.com.
  18. ^ "Screen Previews". Waco Tribune-Herald. 1955. p. 42. Retrieved October 17, 2017 – via Newspapers.com.
  19. ^ "Sandusky-Drive-In". The Sandusky Register. July 9, 1955. p. 2. Retrieved October 17, 2017 – via Newspapers.com.
  20. ^ "Facing Attack". The Mason City Globe-Gazette. May 28, 1955. p. 12. Retrieved October 17, 2017 – via Newspapers.com.
  21. ^ "Wednesday Primetime B Grid" (PDF). Los Angeles Times. May 20, 2015. Retrieved October 17, 2017.
  22. ^ "Wednesday TV, Sept. 17". Courier-Post. September 13, 1958. p. 25. Retrieved October 17, 2017 – via Newspapers.com.
  23. ^ "Lovely Victim". Press and Sun-Bulletin. November 24, 1957. p. 38. Retrieved October 17, 2017 – via Newspapers.com.
  24. ^ "Terror Strikes In 'Jury'". The Miami News. March 28, 1958. p. 20. Retrieved October 17, 2017 – via Newspapers.com.
  25. ^ "Lawman and Girl". Arizona Republic. July 20, 1958. p. 41. Retrieved October 17, 2017 – via Newspapers.com.
  26. ^ "Television Offers Many Feature Films". The Post-Crescent. September 12, 1965. p. 65. Retrieved October 17, 2017 – via Newspapers.com.
  27. ^ "Karin Back in Picture". Arizona Republic. October 18, 1959. p. 30. Retrieved October 17, 2017 – via Newspapers.com.

External links[edit]