Karl Stein (mathematician)

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Karl Stein in Eichstätt, 1968

Karl Stein (1 January 1913, Hamm, Westphalia – 19 October 2000) was a German mathematician. He is well known for complex analysis and cryptography. Stein manifolds and Stein factorization are named after him.

Life[edit]

Karl Stein received his doctorate with his dissertation on the topic Zur Theorie der Funktionen mehrerer komplexer Veränderlichen; Die Regularitätshüllen niederdimensionaler Mannigfaltigkeiten at the University of Münster under the supervision of Heinrich Behnke in 1937. Karl Stein was conscripted into the Wehrmacht sometime before 1942, and trained as a cryptographer to work at OKW/Chi, the Cipher Department of the High Command of the Wehrmacht. He was assigned to manage the OKW/Chi IV, Subsection a, which was a unit responsible for security of own processes, cipher devices testing, and invention of new cipher devices. He managed a staff of 11[1] In 1955 he became professor at the Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich and emeritated in 1981. In 1990 he received the first Cantor medal.

See also[edit]

See also[edit]

His doctoral descendents include Michael Schneider (Universität Bayreuth), Otto Forster, Ivo Schneider, Gunther Schmidt and Martin Schottenloher.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Christof Teuscher (2004). Alan Turing: Life and Legacy of a Great Thinker. Springer Science & Business Media. p. 464. ISBN 978-3-540-20020-8.