Karl Te Nana

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Karl Te Nana
Birth nameKarl Solomon Te Nana
Date of birth (1975-07-15) 15 July 1975 (age 44)
Place of birthPalmerston North, New Zealand
Height193 cm (6 ft 4 in)
Weight96 kg (15 st 2 lb; 212 lb)
Rugby union career
Position(s) Wing
Provincial / State sides
Years Team Apps (Points)
North Harbour ()
Super Rugby
Years Team Apps (Points)
2000 Highlanders 5 (5)
National sevens team(s)
Years Team Comps
New Zealand

Karl Solomon Te Nana (born 15 July 1975) is a New Zealand former rugby union and rugby league footballer, and currently works in broadcasting as a rugby commentator.

A professional rugby union player, Te Nana won a gold medal as part of the New Zealand rugby sevens national team at the 2002 Commonwealth Games.[1] He scored 113 tries for the New Zealand rugby sevens team. He played for North Harbour in the National Provincial Championship and spent the 2000 season with the Otago Highlanders in Super Rugby (then known as the Super 12).

He played for the Point Chevalier Pirates in the Auckland Rugby League's Phelan Shield.[2]

In 2019, he was on the first panel to determine the World Rugby women's-15s player-of-the-year award with Melodie Robinson, Danielle Waterman, Will Greenwood, Liza Burgess, Lynne Cantwell, Fiona Coghlan, Gaëlle Mignot, Jillion Potter, and Stephen Jones.[3]

Television[edit]

Now retired, Te Nana hosted a weekly rugby show on Sky TV in New Zealand called "This Given Sunday" with former All Black halfback Steve Devine. Also a regular world rugby commentator on the 7's World Series for both men's and woman's. He hosts, reports and commentates on All Blacks, Super Rugby, college rugby and provincial rugby for Sky TV in New Zealand.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Profile at the New Zealand Olympic Committee website
  2. ^ "Forget about the last game, get ready for another". The Sunday Star-Times. 30 May 2010. Retrieved 8 October 2011.
  3. ^ worldrugby.org. "Stars join new-look World Rugby Awards panels". www.world.rugby. Retrieved 24 March 2019.