Karlstad, Minnesota

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
This article is about the town in Minnesota. For the town in Sweden, see Karlstad. For the historical encampment near Copenhagen, see Carlstad.
Karlstad, Minnesota
City
Location of Karlstad, Minnesota
Location of Karlstad, Minnesota
Coordinates: 48°34′34″N 96°31′8″W / 48.57611°N 96.51889°W / 48.57611; -96.51889
Country United States
State Minnesota
County Kittson
Area[1]
 • Total 1.53 sq mi (3.96 km2)
 • Land 1.53 sq mi (3.96 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation 1,050 ft (320 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 760
 • Estimate (2012[3]) 748
 • Density 496.7/sq mi (191.8/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code 56732
Area code(s) 218
FIPS code 27-32444
GNIS feature ID 0646041[4]
Website http://www.ci.karlstad.mn.us/

Karlstad is a city in Kittson County, Minnesota, United States. The population was 760 at the 2010 census.[5]

U.S. Route 59 and Minnesota State Highway 11 are two of the main arterial routes in the city. The current mayor is Nick Amb, teacher at Tri-County Public Schools (elected in 2006). The city's slogan is "The Moose Capital of the North".

History[edit]

A post office called Karlstad has been in operation since 1905.[6] The city was named after Karlstad, in Sweden.[7]

Enterprise[edit]

Karlstad's largest employers are Wikstrom Telephone Company (Wiktel) and Mattracks. Wiktel provides internet and phone services for much of Northwestern Minnesota, including the regional telephone directory. The company has a long history in Karlstad, going back to the early 1900s. It was founded by the Wikstrom family, and many of the current employees are Wikstroms. Mattracks, however, is a newly founded company within the last 15 years, and manufactures and markets track conversion systems. Started by Glen Brazier, the rapidly growing company recently opened a new plant in China. Other than these two companies, most town businesses are locally owned and employ only a few individuals. Businesses include Hardware Hank, Germundson's Home Furnishings, Tony's Supermarket, Kim's Shear Design & Tanning, Nordisk Hemslojd, a Scandinavian gifts shop, a few restaurants and bars, and insurance and accounting services (etc.). In addition, the local community is primarily a farming one.

From 1951 through 1995, the town had its own hospital.[8]

Events[edit]

Every year Karlstad has the annual Kick'n Up Kountry Music Festival and Moosefest

Education[edit]

Karlstad has two schools: Heritage Christian School and Tri-County Public Schools. Both schools serve grades K-12. Tri-County School combines with Marshall County Central Schools of Newfolden, Minnesota, located 17 miles to the south, for all of its athletic programs. The name given for the consolidated team is the Northern Freeze. Girls and boys track are also combined with Badger School and Greenbush Middle River School. Baseball and Softball have included Stephen-Argyle School District in their sports coops. The Northern Freeze coop has proved to be a success for all schools involved. The Freeze, since the coop, have advanced to the State Tournament three times: Volleyball (2006, 6th place), Baseball (2009) and Girls Basketball (2010, 4th place).

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.53 square miles (3.96 km2), all of it land.[1]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1910 138
1920 286 107.2%
1930 304 6.3%
1940 501 64.8%
1950 804 60.5%
1960 720 −10.4%
1970 727 1.0%
1980 934 28.5%
1990 881 −5.7%
2000 794 −9.9%
2010 760 −4.3%
Est. 2015 733 [9] −3.6%
U.S. Decennial Census[10]
2012 Estimate[11]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 760 people, 331 households, and 189 families residing in the city. The population density was 496.7 inhabitants per square mile (191.8/km2). There were 399 housing units at an average density of 260.8 per square mile (100.7/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 99.1% White, 0.3% African American, 0.1% Native American, 0.3% Asian, and 0.3% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.4% of the population.

There were 331 households of which 24.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 44.4% were married couples living together, 8.5% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.2% had a male householder with no wife present, and 42.9% were non-families. 39.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 23.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.16 and the average family size was 2.92.

The median age in the city was 47.5 years. 22.5% of residents were under the age of 18; 5.1% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 20% were from 25 to 44; 24.8% were from 45 to 64; and 27.6% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 45.4% male and 54.6% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the 2000 census, there were 794 people, 340 households, and 199 families residing in the city. The population density was 522.3 people per square mile (201.7/km²). There were 394 housing units at an average density of 259.2 per square mile (100.1/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 97.86% White, 0.63% Native American, 0.13% from other races, and 1.39% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.38% of the population. 47.5% were of Norwegian, 19.9% Swedish and 9.9% German ancestry.

There were 340 households out of which 24.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 44.7% were married couples living together, 10.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 41.2% were non-families. 36.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 23.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.15 and the average family size was 2.81.

In the city, the population was spread out with 21.9% under the age of 18, 7.1% from 18 to 24, 21.4% from 25 to 44, 22.0% from 45 to 64, and 27.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 45 years. For every 100 females there were 85.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 83.4 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $25,208, and the median income for a family was $35,469. Males had a median income of $29,444 versus $20,893 for females. The per capita income for the city was $13,274. About 9.2% of families and 13.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 14.4% of those under age 18 and 15.3% of those age 65 or over.

Notable People[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on January 24, 2012. Retrieved 2012-11-13. 
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-11-13. 
  3. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on June 17, 2013. Retrieved 2013-05-28. 
  4. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  5. ^ "2010 Census Redistricting Data (Public Law 94-171) Summary File". American FactFinder. U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census. Archived from the original on July 21, 2011. Retrieved 23 April 2011. 
  6. ^ "Kittson County". Jim Forte Postal History. Retrieved 17 July 2015. 
  7. ^ Upham, Warren (1920). Minnesota Geographic Names: Their Origin and Historic Significance. Minnesota Historical Society. p. 278. 
  8. ^ Ryan Bakken (May 10, 2004). "In Karlstad, Minn., Losing the Hospital in 1995 Was a Sad, Bitter Blow". Grand Forks Herald. Retrieved November 24, 2009. 
  9. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2015". Retrieved July 2, 2016. 
  10. ^ United States Census Bureau. "Census of Population and Housing". Archived from the original on May 11, 2015. Retrieved September 11, 2013. 
  11. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012". Retrieved September 11, 2013. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 48°34′39″N 96°31′14″W / 48.57750°N 96.52056°W / 48.57750; -96.52056