Kate Kellaway

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Kate Kellaway
Born (1957-07-15) 15 July 1957 (age 62)
England
OccupationJournalist, literary critic
GenreJournalism, criticism

Kate Kellaway (born 15 July 1957) is an English journalist and literary critic who writes for The Observer.

Background and career[edit]

The daughter of the Australians Bill and Deborah Kellaway,[1] she is the older sister of the journalist Lucy Kellaway. Both siblings were educated at the Camden School for Girls, where their mother was a teacher,[2] and at Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford, where Kate Kellaway read English.[3]

Following a period teaching in Zimbabwe between 1982 and 1986,[4] she began her career in journalism at the Literary Review[5] and became deputy to then editor Auberon Waugh around 1987.[6]

Kellaway later joined The Observer, where her posts have included features writer, deputy literary editor, deputy theatre critic and children's books editor.[7] While The Observer's poetry editor.[8] Kellaway was one of the five judges for the Booker Prize in 1995.[9]

Kellaway is married and has four sons and two step-sons.[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hester Robinson, Obituary: Deborah Kellaway, The Guardian, 27 January 2006.
  2. ^ Williams, Sally (25 April 2010), "Lucy Kellaway interview for In Office Hours", The Daily Telegraph, retrieved 19 December 2011
  3. ^ "Prominent LMH Alumni", Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford.
  4. ^ Kate Kellaway, "Once upon a time in Africa", The Guardian, 16 April 2000.
  5. ^ Lynn Barber, "Waugh Stories", The Guardian, 21 January 2001.
  6. ^ Kate Kellaway, "It's good to be rude", The Observer, 8 September 2000.
  7. ^ "Literary Festival (2011) - Julie Myerson talks to Kate Kellaway Then", London Jewish Cultural Centre.
  8. ^ Marianne MacDonald and John McKie, "Amis given short shrift as his novel fails to make the shortlist", The Independent, 29 September 1995.
  9. ^ "The Booker Prize 1995", The Man Booker Prize website.
  10. ^ Jenni Murray, That's My Boy, London: Vermilion (Random House), 2003, p. 30.

External links[edit]