Kate Trotter

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Kate Trotter
Born (1953-02-05) February 5, 1953 (age 65)
Toronto, Ontario
Nationality Canadian
Occupation film, television and stage actress

Kate Trotter (born February 5, 1953) is a Canadian film, television and stage actress.

Career[edit]

Her television roles have included appearances in Wild Roses, Covert Affairs, Lost Girl, The Newsroom, Paradise Falls, Earth: Final Conflict, Kung Fu: The Legend Continues, The Jane Show, Republic of Doyle, Blue Murder, Murdoch Mysteries, Friday the 13th: the Series and Sue Thomas F.B. Eye, while her film roles have included Beyond Borders, Joshua Then and Now, Martha, Ruth & Edie, Murder in the Hamptons, Glory Enough for All, Murder in Space, Taking a Chance on Love, Clarence and Tru Love. She won a Gemini Award for Guest Actress in a Dramatic Series in 2003 for Blue Murder.[1]

Her stage roles have included Miss Havisham in Great Expectations,[2] Madge Kendal in The Elephant Man,[3] Alma in Summer and Smoke,[4] Juliet in Romeo and Juliet,[4] Hermione in The Winter's Tale,[4] Katie in Quiet in the Land[5] and Ann Whitfield in Man and Superman.[4] She has been a three-time Dora Mavor Moore Award winner for her stage roles.[1]

In addition to her own acting, Trotter has also taught acting at George Brown College and the Armstrong Studio, and works as a professional communication coach.[6]

Personal life[edit]

She was briefly married in the 1980s to theatre director Guy Sprung.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "A love affair with the open road". National Post, May 7, 2004.
  2. ^ "Pip, cheerio: Michael Shamata and Kate Trotter on adapting Great Expectations". National Post, July 18, 2013.
  3. ^ "The Disease Of The Century play; The Elephant Man examines the hypocrisies of philanthropy". National Post, October 20, 2007.
  4. ^ a b c d e "Kate's Way". FYI News, October 16, 2007.
  5. ^ "Blyth's hit also its worthiest drama". The Globe and Mail, July 18, 1981.
  6. ^ "Clarity in the courtroom: Latin is out and easy-to-read rulings are in as justices go to writing school". Toronto Star, August 6, 2011.

External links[edit]