Katherine K. Young

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Katherine K. Young is a Canadian religious studies professor at McGill University.[1]


She was awarded her M.A. from the University of Chicago and her Ph.D. from McGill University, for research on the history of religions, specializing in Hinduism. After completing her doctorate Young remained at McGill as a faculty member where she continues to teach.

She has been proferred as an expert in Perry v. Schwarzenegger by litigants who intervened in the case to defend a California constitutional amendment denying same-sex couples of the right to marry. The defendant intervenors against gay marriage removed her as a witness, but the trial court judge allowed her prior videotaped deposition to be entered into evidence.


  • with Paul Nathanson. Spreading Misandry. 2001.
  • with Paul Nathanson. Legalizing Misandry. 2006.
  • with Paul Nathanson. Sanctifying Misandry: Goddess Ideology and the Fall of Man. 2010.
  • with Paul Nathanson. Replacing Misandry: A Revolutionary History of Men. 2015.
  • 'Women in Hinduism'. In Today's Woman in World Religions. Albany, New York: State University of New York Press, 1994. Pages 77–136.
  • 'World Religions: A Category in the Making?' Chapter 11 in Michael Despland and Gérard Vallée (editors). Religion in History: The Word, the Idea, the Reality. :,1992.
  • 'Hinduism'. In Encyclopedia of Feminist Theories. London: Routledge, 2000. Pages 248–249.
  • Review of Transdisciplinarity: Recreating Integrated Knowledge. In Encyclopedia of Life Support Systems. Oxford: UNESCO, 2000.
  • General editor of the McGill Studies in the History of Religions series.
  • Co-editor with David E. Guinn and Chris Barrigar (editors). Religion and Law in the Global Village. Atlanta: Scholars Press, 2000.
  • Co-editor with Arvind Sharma. Feminism and World Religions. Albany, New York: State University of New York Press, 1998.

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