Kathleen Jamie

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Kathleen Jamie FRSL (born 13 May 1962) is a Scottish poet and essayist.

Portrait

Life and work[edit]

Kathleen Jamie is a poet and essayist. Raised in Currie, near Edinburgh, she studied philosophy at Edinburgh University, publishing her first poems as an undergraduate. Her writing is rooted in Scottish landscape and culture, but ranges through travel, women's issues, archaeology and visual art. She writes in English and occasionally in Lowland Scots. [1] [1][2]

A noted poet, Jamie's collections include The Queen of Sheba (1995). Her 2004 collection The Tree House revealed an increasing interest in the natural world. This book won the Forward Poetry Prize and the Scottish Book of the Year Award. The Overhaul was published in September 2012.[1] It won the 2012 Costa poetry award.[3] For the last decade Jamie has also written non-fiction. Her collections of essays Findings and Sightlines are considered highly influential works of nature and landscape writing. On publication in the USA, the latter won the John Burroughs Medal and the Orion Book Award. [1] Jamie writes occasional essays and reviews for the London Review of Books, The Guardian etc.

A poem by Kathleen Jamie is inscribed on the national monument at Bannockburn.

Jamie is presently Professor of Poetry at Stirling University. She is represented by Jenny Brown of Jenny Brown Associates. [1]

The Bonniest Companie, a new collection of poems, will be published in 2015.

Awards[edit]

Bibliography[edit]

  • Black Spiders 1982
  • A Flame In Your Heart (with Andrew Greig) 1986
  • The Way We Live 1987
  • The Golden Peak: Travels in North Pakistan 1992 (reissued as Among Muslims in 2002)
  • The Autonomous Region: Poems and Photographs from Tibet 1993
  • The Queen of Sheba 1994
  • Jizzen 1999
  • Mr & Mrs Scotland Are Dead (Poems 1980-94) 2002 (shortlisted for the 2003 International Griffin Poetry Prize)
  • The Treehouse 2004 (winner of the Forward Poetry Prize) and Scottish Book of the Year Award.
  • Findings 2005, essays
  • Sightlines 2012, essays
  • The Overhaul (September 2012)

References[edit]

External links[edit]