Kathryn Leigh Scott

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Kathryn Leigh Scott
Kathryn Leigh Scott.jpg
Kathryn Leigh Scott in 2009
Born Marlene Kathryn Kringstad
(1943-01-26) January 26, 1943 (age 74)
Robbinsdale, Minnesota, U.S.
Occupation Actress, writer
Years active 1966–present
Spouse(s) Ben Martin (m. 1970–1990); divorced[1]
Geoff Miller (m. 1991–2011); his death

Kathryn Leigh Scott (born Marlene Kringstad;[2] January 26, 1943) is an American television and film actress who is best remembered for playing several roles on Dark Shadows.

Early life[edit]

Scott was born Marlene Kathryn Kringstad[3] in Robbinsdale, Minnesota to Ole and Hilda Sophie (née Karlsgodt) Kringstad,[3] both of Norwegian descent.[4]

Career[edit]

Upon arriving in New York City she changed her name to Kathryn Leigh Scott. In 1966, she was cast as Maggie Evans the waitress-turned-governess on the ABC-TV cult serial Dark Shadows. During her tenure at the show, she played Josette du Pres (a lover of Barnabas Collins {Jonathan Frid}, who committed suicide at Widow's Hill in 1795); Rachel Drummond (a governess in 1897); Kitty Soames (aka Lady Hampshire on the second half of the 1897 storyline); and Maggie Collins (aka Maggie Evans), who married Quentin Collins (David Selby) in "Parallel Time" (1970). She appeared in House of Dark Shadows, a MGM picture based on the Dark Shadows TV series in 1970. That same year in September, she decided to leave the show to move to France with her boyfriend, Time magazine photographer Ben Martin, whom she later married.[when?] A few months later, Dark Shadows ended its five-year run in April 1971.[citation needed]

After Dark Shadows she made guest appearances on such TV shows as Dallas, Police Squad!, Dynasty, Quincy, Magnum, P.I., Cagney and Lacey, Matlock, The Incredible Hulk, The A-Team, and Star Trek: The Next Generation. She also appeared in films, such as The Great Gatsby and Brannigan. In 1979, she co-starred in the short-lived CBS series Big Shamus, Little Shamus with Brian Dennehy. In 1983, she co-starred in Philip Marlowe, Private Eye with Powers Boothe on HBO until 1986.[citation needed]

In 2013, Kathryn was reunited with her Dark Shadows co-stars Jerry Lacy and Lara Parker in the feature film Doctor Mabuse, written and directed by Ansel Faraj. The film was released in May.

Kathryn is a volunteer national spokesperson for CurePSP, a foundation dedicated to research into progressive supranuclear palsy and other Parkinson's Plus diseases. She has written "Last Dance At the Savoy," "The Happy Hours," "Now With You, Now Without" and "A Welcome Respite" about caregiving.

She is the author of the Jinx Fogarty mystery series: "Down And Out in Beverly Heels" and "Jinxed (In Hollywood)". She's also written the paranormal mystery, "Dark Passages."

Pomegranate Press[edit]

In 1986 she founded Pomegranate Press, which published her books about Dark Shadows and other books including "The Bunny Years" about the 25-year history of Playboy Bunnies, and coffee table books on film art. Her Pomegranate Press has also published a number of books by other authors, mainly nonfiction entertainment titles. Today, she continues to work as an actress (Three Christs with Richard Gere, 2017) and writer ("Last Dance At the Savoy, "Now With You, Now Without" published by Grand Harbor). She reprised a number of her Dark Shadows roles in a series of audio dramas. Scott co-wrote (with Jim Pierson) Dark Shadows: Return to Collinwood, an updated retrospective on the original series, the Tim Burton remake with Johnny Depp, Dark Shadows, in which Scott has a cameo role. The book was released on April 3, 2012 via Pomegranate Press.[5]

Personal life[edit]

She married her first husband, photographer Ben Martin in 1971. They divorced in 1990, although the two remained business partners in Pomegranate Press.[1] Martin died in February 2017.[6]

In 1991, she married Los Angeles magazine founder Geoff Miller. She and Miller remained together until his death in 2011 of progressive supranuclear palsy.[7][8]

Filmography[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]