Kathy Ridgewell-Williams

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Kathy Ridgewell-Williams
Personal information
Birth name Kathy Ridgewell
Place of birth Auburn, Washington, U.S.[1]
Height 5 ft 3 in (1.60 m)[2]
Playing position Forward[2]
College career
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1985 WWU Vikings ? (13)
1987 Cal Bears
National team
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1985–1987 United States 3 (0)

Kathy Ridgewell-Williams is an American former soccer player who played as a forward, making three appearances for the United States women's national team.

Career[edit]

Ridgewell-Williams attended Evergreen High School,[3] before attending college at Green River Community College for her freshman year.[2] For her sophmore year, she transferred to Western Washington University where she played soccer for the Vikings in 1985, finishing the season as the team's top scorer with thirteen goals while also registering four assists. She was selected as a NAIA First-Team All-American, and was also included in the NAIA All-District First Team.[4] However, she decided to sit out the following season in order to focus on making the U.S. team at the Olympic Festival.[1] She was also listed on the roster of the Colorado College Tigers from 1986 to 1987.[5][6] For her senior year, Ridgewell-Williams played for the California Golden Bears in the 1987 season. There she was chosen as an NSCAA Third-Team All-American and was included in the NSCAA All-Region selection.[7] In 2016, she was included in the Top 50 Women Players ranking by Washington Youth Soccer.[8]

Ridgewell-Williams made her international debut for the United States in the team's inaugural match on August 18, 1985 at the Mundialito against Italy. In total, she made three appearances for the U.S., earning her final cap on July 11, 1987 in a friendly match against Norway.[9]

Personal life[edit]

Ridgewell-Williams later worked as the assistant director of a soccer club, as well as the general manager of an indoor training facility.[10]

Career statistics[edit]

International[edit]

United States[9]
Year Apps Goals
1985 1 0
1987 2 0
Total 3 0

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Sports Preview: Women's Soccer" (PDF). Résumé. Vol. 14 no. 4 (Summer 1986). Western Washington University. 1986. p. 7. Archived from the original on August 11, 2019. Retrieved August 11, 2019.
  2. ^ a b c Mahoney, Tim (October 11, 1985). "Scoring now team effort" (PDF). Western Front. Vol. 77 no. 43. Bellingham, Washington: Western Washington University. p. 9. Archived from the original on August 11, 2019. Retrieved August 11, 2019.
  3. ^ "Akers Named Collegiate Player of the Year". January 20, 1988. Archived from the original on August 11, 2019. Retrieved August 11, 2019.
  4. ^ "Western Washington Vikings Soccer 2011 Women's Media Guide" (PDF). Western Washington Vikings. 2011. Archived (PDF) from the original on August 11, 2019. Retrieved August 11, 2019.
  5. ^ "1986 Women's Soccer Roster". Colorado College Tigers. Archived from the original on August 11, 2019. Retrieved August 11, 2019.
  6. ^ "1987 Women's Soccer Roster". Colorado College Tigers. Archived from the original on August 11, 2019. Retrieved August 11, 2019.
  7. ^ "Cal 2016 Women's Soccer Information Guide" (PDF). California Golden Bears. July 25, 2016. Archived (PDF) from the original on August 11, 2019. Retrieved August 11, 2019.
  8. ^ "Top 50 Player Voting". Washington Youth Soccer. 2016. Archived from the original on August 11, 2019. Retrieved August 11, 2019.
  9. ^ a b "2019 U.S. Women's National Team Media Guide" (PDF). United States Soccer Federation. 2019. Archived (PDF) from the original on August 11, 2019. Retrieved August 11, 2019.
  10. ^ "U.S. Soccer: The 17 women who blazed an amazing trail". Soccer America. November 1, 2000. Archived from the original on August 11, 2019. Retrieved August 11, 2019.