Katie Kitamura

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Born1979
LanguageEnglish
NationalityAmerican
Alma materPrinceton University, London Consortium
Notable worksThe Longshot
SpouseHari Kunzru
Children2[1]

Katie Kitamura is an American novelist, journalist, and art critic. She is currently an Honorary Research Fellow at the London Consortium.[2]

Early life and education[edit]

Katie Kitamura was born in California in 1979 to a family of Japanese origin,[3] and raised in California.[2][4]

Kitamura graduated from Princeton University in New Jersey in 1999. She earned a PhD in American literature from the London Consortium.[5] Her thesis was titled The Aesthetics of Vulgarity and the Modern American Novel (2005).[6]

Earlier in her life, Kitamura trained as a ballerina.[7][8]

Career[edit]

Non-fiction[edit]

Kitamura wrote Japanese for Travellers – A Journey, describing her travels across Japan and examining the dichotomies of its society and her own place in it as a Japanese-American.[9]

Fiction[edit]

Kitamura was introduced to mixed martial arts in Japan by her brother.[10] Her first novel, The Longshot, published in 2009, is about the preparation undertaken by a fighter and his trainer ahead of a championship bout against a famous opponent. The cover art of the US edition of her book features the title tattooed on knuckles; the knuckles are her brother's.[7] Kitamura's second novel, Gone to the Forest, published in 2013, is set in an unnamed colonial country and describes the life and suffering of a landowning family against a backdrop of civil strife and political change.[11]

Film adaptation[edit]

Kitamura's novel A Separation will be adapted for a film starring Katherine Waterston.[12]

Journalism[edit]

Kitamura writes for The Guardian, The New York Times, and Wired.[2] She has written articles on mixed martial arts,[13] film criticism and analysis,[14] and art.[15][16]

Awards and recognition[edit]

In 2010, Kitamura's The Longshot was shortlisted for the New York Public Library's Young Lions Fiction Award.[17]

Selected bibliography[edit]

Books[edit]

  • Japanese for Travellers: A Journey. Hamish Hamilton. 2006. ISBN 978-0-241-14289-9.
  • The Longshot: A Novel. Free Press. August 11, 2009. ISBN 978-1-4391-1760-6.
  • Gone to the Forest. Profile Books. February 14, 2013. ISBN 978-1-84765-907-1.
  • A Separation. Penguin Random House. February 7, 2017. ISBN 978-0-3995-7612-6.

Journalism[edit]

Personal life[edit]

Kitamura is married to author Hari Kunzru.[20]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kunzru-Kitamura children
  2. ^ a b c "Katie Kitamura". Conville & Walsh literary agency. Retrieved December 8, 2013.
  3. ^ Philip Womack (January 11, 2013). "Five young novelists for 2013". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved December 8, 2013.
  4. ^ http://readers.penguin.co.uk/nf/shared/WebDisplay/0,,214880_11_1,00.html
  5. ^ Samantha Kuok Leese (August 10, 2012). "Katie Kitamura interview". Spectator. Retrieved December 8, 2013.
  6. ^ "PhD Titles". The London Consortium. Archived from the original on March 4, 2016. Retrieved December 8, 2013.
  7. ^ a b Will Doig (August 19, 2009). "How to Fight Like a Girl". The Daily Beast. Retrieved December 8, 2013.
  8. ^ "Katie Kitamura interviews at Simon & Schuster". Retrieved December 8, 2013.
  9. ^ Sophie Campbell (August 30, 2006). "Japan through American eyes". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved December 8, 2013.
  10. ^ Katherine Federici Greenwood (November 18, 2009). "In the ring". Princeton Alumni Weekly. 111 (5). Retrieved December 8, 2013.
  11. ^ Sarah Hall (February 6, 2013). "Gone to the Forest by Katie Kitamura – review". The Guardian. Retrieved December 8, 2013.
  12. ^ Hipes, Patrick (February 1, 2017). "Katherine Waterston To Star In Movie Adaptation Of Upcoming Novel 'A Separation'". Deadline. Retrieved February 1, 2017.
  13. ^ Katie Kitamura (April 29, 2006). "The harder they come". The Guardian. Retrieved December 8, 2013.
  14. ^ Katie Kitamura (June 15, 2012). "With Grain: A Q&A with Apichatpong Weerasethakul". Asian American Writers' Workshop. Retrieved December 8, 2013.
  15. ^ Katie Kitamura (January 19, 2009). "Little London Prop Shop Turns Ideas Into Art". Wired. Retrieved December 8, 2013.
  16. ^ Katie Kitamura (August 2008). "Liam Gillick". Frieze Magazine (114). Retrieved December 8, 2013.
  17. ^ "Provocateurs, Mind Bogglers, and Tragedians: Five Young Literary Talents Chosen as Finalists for The New York Public Library's 2010 Young Lions Fiction Award" (Press release). New York Public Library. Retrieved December 8, 2013.
  18. ^ "Articles by Katie Kitamura". Frieze Magazine. Retrieved December 8, 2013.
  19. ^ "Contemporary magazine". Contemporary Magazine. Retrieved May 12, 2014.
  20. ^ Jonathan Lee (September 3, 2013). "Bare-Knuckle Writing". Guernica. Retrieved December 8, 2013.