Kay's Cross

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Kay's Cross
Kay's Cross.jpg
Kay's Cross in 2010
LocationKaysville, Utah, US
Coordinates41°03′02.67″N 111°55′31.25″W / 41.0507417°N 111.9253472°W / 41.0507417; -111.9253472Coordinates: 41°03′02.67″N 111°55′31.25″W / 41.0507417°N 111.9253472°W / 41.0507417; -111.9253472

Kay's Cross was a large stone cross (roughly 20 feet (6.1 m) high by 13 feet (4.0 m) wide) located at the base of a hollow in northeastern Kaysville, Utah, United States.[1] Its origins are disputed, and several urban legends are tied to the site.[2] The cross was demolished with explosives by unknown persons in 1992.

Origin[edit]

One account of the origin of the cross states it was built in 1946 by locals influenced by Krishna Venta, a religious leader in the 1940s and 50s, who claimed to be the Second Coming of Christ and led a small sect based out of Simi Valley, California. The cross was built by a man named Kingston in honor of Krishna Venta.

Demolition[edit]

The 'K' on Kay's Cross in 2010

On 15 February 1992, the cross was destroyed by an explosion; police made no immediate arrests.[3]

In 2013, a "haunted" tour of Kay's Cross and the surrounding forest was started, stirring interest again in the decades-old legend.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Andy Weeks (1 July 2012). Haunted Utah: Ghosts and Strange Phenomena of the Beehive State. Stackpole Books. pp. 35–. ISBN 978-0-8117-4875-9.
  2. ^ Mark Sceurman; Mark Moran; Matt Lake (2008). Weird U.S.: The Oddyssey Continues : Your Travel Guide to America's Local Legends and Best Kept Secrets. Sterling Publishing Company, Inc. pp. 286–. ISBN 978-1-4027-4544-7.
  3. ^ "Another Angle Surfaces in Kays Cross Saga". Deseret News. 5 April 1992.
  4. ^ "Home". kayscross.com.

External links[edit]