Kazuyoshi Miura

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Kazuyoshi Miura
Kazu Miura at Matsuda tribute match 20120122.jpg
Miura in 2012
Personal information
Full name Kazuyoshi Miura
Date of birth (1967-02-26) 26 February 1967 (age 50)
Place of birth Shizuoka City, Japan
Height 1.77 m (5 ft 9 12 in)
Playing position Striker
Club information
Current team
Yokohama FC
Number 11
Youth career
1973–1979 Jonai F.C.
1979–1982 Jonai Jr. H.S.
1982 Shizuoka Gakuen H.S.
1982–1986 Clube Atlético Juventus
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1986 JDT 2 (0)
1986 Palmeiras
1986 Matsubara
1987 CRB
1987–1988 XV de Jaú
1988–1989 Coritiba 21 (2)
1990 Santos 11 (3)
1990–1998 Yomiuri/Verdy Kawasaki 192 (100)
1994–1995 Genoa (loan) 21 (1)
1999 Dinamo Zagreb 12 (0)
1999–2000 Kyoto Purple Sanga 41 (21)
2001–2005 Vissel Kobe 103 (24)
2005– Yokohama FC 237 (23)
2005 Sydney FC (loan) 4 (2)
National team
1990–2000[1] Japan 89 (55)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only and correct as of 10:51, 27 March 2017 (UTC).
‡ National team caps and goals correct as of February 27, 2017

Kazuyoshi Miura (三浦 知良?, Miura Kazuyoshi, born on 26 February 1967),[2] often known simply as Kazu (nicknamed as King Kazu[3]), is a Japanese footballer who plays as a forward. He played for the Japanese national team and was the first Japanese recipient of the Asian Player of the Year award in 1993,[4] an award presented annually by the Asian Football Confederation.[5] He currently plays for Yokohama FC in the J. League Division 2.[6][7] Kazu, whose rise to fame in Japan coincided with the launch of the J. League in 1993,[8] was arguably Japan's first superstar in football.

Miura holds the records for being the oldest footballer and oldest goalscorer in worldwide professional leagues at age 50.[9] His elder brother Yasutoshi was also a professional footballer.[10]

Club career[edit]

In 1982, Miura left the Shizuoka Gakuen School after less than a year, and travelled alone to Brazil at the age of fifteen to become a professional footballer there.[4] He signed with Clube Atlético Juventus, a youth club in São Paulo, and in 1986, Kazu signed his first professional contract with Santos. He played for several other Brazilian clubs including Palmeiras and Coritiba until his return to Japan in 1990.[4]

His time in Brazil elevated him to star status and on his return to Japan, he joined the Japan Soccer League side Yomiuri FC, which later spun off from its parent company Yomiuri Shinbun and became Verdy Kawasaki with the launch of the J. League in 1993.[2][11] With Yomiuri/Kawasaki, Kazu won four consecutive league titles playing alongside fellow Japanese national team regulars Ruy Ramos and Tsuyoshi Kitazawa. Yomiuri won the last two JSL titles in 1991 and 1992 and Verdy Kawasaki won the first two J. League titles in 1993 and 1994. He was named the first J. League Most Valuable Player in 1993 and the last unofficial Asian Footballer of the Year in 1993.[4][12]

Miura then became the first Japanese footballer to play in Italy, joining Genoa C.F.C. in the 1994–95 Serie A season.[4] In his Italian stint, he played 21 times and scored just one goal, during the Genoa derby against Sampdoria. He returned to Verdy Kawasaki for the 1995 season and played with them until the end of the 1998 season.[4] Kazu made another attempt at playing in Europe with Dinamo Zagreb in 1999. He returned to Japan however, following a brief trial with Bournemouth, in the same year, and played with Kyoto Purple Sanga and Vissel Kobe, before eventually signing for Yokohama F.C. in 2005.

He played with Sydney FC of the A-League on a two-month loan in late 2005, appearing in league matches and the 2005 FIFA World Club Championship held in Japan. Kazu scored two goals in his second A-League match, a 3–2 defeat at league leaders Adelaide United.

He is known for his trade mark "Kazu Feint" and his famous "Kazu dance" when he scores great goals or produces great plays. In 2007, Kazuyoshi Miura was selected for the 2007 JOMO All Stars match for J-East and played exceptionally well.[13]

In November 2015, Miura signed a new one-year contract with Yokohama FC at the age of 48.[14] In January 2017, Miura signed another new one-year contract with Yokohoma, taking his professional career into his 50s.[15][16]

On 5 March 2017, Miura became the oldest ever player to feature in a professional match when he started in Yokohama's 1–1 draw against V-Varen Nagasaki. With 50 years and 7 days, he surpassed the previous record held by Stanley Matthews from 1965 by two days.[17] Seven days later, he broke Matthews' record for oldest goalscorer in professional football when he struck the only goal of a 1–0 win over Thespakusatsu Gunma.[18]

International career[edit]

Miura scored fourteen times for Japan during qualification for the 1998 FIFA World Cup, leading the Blue Samurai to their first ever FIFA World Cup finals.[19] He played his last national team match in 2000, and finished with the second-most career goals in Japanese national team history with 55 goals in 89 matches.

Career statistics[edit]

Club[edit]

Updated to 27 March 2017.[20]

Club Season League Emperor's Cup J. League Cup Other1 Total
Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals
Yokohama FC 2006 39 6 0 0 39 6
2007 24 3 2 0 4 0 30 3
2008 30 1 2 0 32 1
2009 30 1 0 0 30 1
2010 10 3 0 0 10 3
2011 30 0 1 0 31 0
2012 14 1 0 0 14 1
2013 18 2 0 0 18 2
2014 2 0 0 0 2 0
2015 16 3 0 0 16 3
2016 20 2 0 0 20 2
2017 4 1 0 0 4 1
Career total 237 23 5 0 4 0 246 23

1Includes Japanese Super Cup.

International[edit]

[21]

Japan national team
Year Apps Goals
1990 3 0
1991 2 0
1992 11 2
1993 16 16
1994 8 5
1995 12 6
1996 12 6
1997 19 18
1998 1 0
1999 0 0
2000 5 2
Total 89 55

International goals[edit]

[1]

# Date Venue Opponent Score Result Competition
1. August 26, 1992 Beijing, China  North Korea 4-1 Won 1992 Dynasty Cup
2. November 3, 1992 Hiroshima, Japan  Iran 1-0 Won 1992 AFC Asian Cup Group Stage
3. March 14, 1993 Tokyo, Japan  United States 3-1 Won Friendly
4. March 14, 1993 Tokyo, Japan  United States 3-1 Won Friendly
5. April 8, 1993 Kobe, Japan  Thailand 1-0 Won 1994 FIFA World Cup Qualification
6. April 11, 1993 Tokyo, Japan  Bangladesh 8-0 Won 1994 FIFA World Cup Qualification
7. April 11, 1993 Tokyo, Japan  Bangladesh 8-0 Won 1994 FIFA World Cup Qualification
8. April 11, 1993 Tokyo, Japan  Bangladesh 8-0 Won 1994 FIFA World Cup Qualification
9. April 11, 1993 Tokyo, Japan  Bangladesh 8-0 Won 1994 FIFA World Cup Qualification
10. April 15, 1993 Tokyo, Japan  Sri Lanka 5-0 Won 1994 FIFA World Cup Qualification
11. April 15, 1993 Tokyo, Japan  Sri Lanka 5-0 Won 1994 FIFA World Cup Qualification
12. April 30, 1993 Dubai, United Arab Emirates  Bangladesh 4-1 Won 1994 FIFA World Cup Qualification
13. May 5, 1993 Dubai, United Arab Emirates  Sri Lanka 6-0 Won 1994 FIFA World Cup Qualification
14. October 4, 1993 Tokyo, Japan  Ivory Coast 1-0 Won Afro-Asian Cup of Nations
15. October 21, 1993 Doha, Qatar  North Korea 3-0 Won 1994 FIFA World Cup Qualification
16. October 21, 1993 Doha, Qatar  North Korea 3-0 Won 1994 FIFA World Cup Qualification
17. October 25, 1993 Doha, Qatar  South Korea 1-0 Won 1994 FIFA World Cup Qualification
18. October 28, 1993 Doha, Qatar  Iraq 2-2 Drew 1994 FIFA World Cup Qualification
19. July 8, 1994 Nagoya, Japan  Ghana 3-2 Won Friendly
20. July 8, 1994 Nagoya, Japan  Ghana 3-2 Won Friendly
21. July 14, 1994 Kobe, Japan  Ghana 2-1 Won Friendly
22. October 3, 1994 Hiroshima, Japan  United Arab Emirates 1-1 Drew 1994 Asian Games Group Stage
23. October 11, 1994 Hiroshima, Japan  South Korea 2-3 Lost 1994 Asian Games Quarter-Finals
24. January 8, 1995 Riyadh, Saudi Arabia  Argentina 1-5 Lost 1995 King Fahd Cup Group Stage
25. May 28, 1995 Tokyo, Japan  Ecuador 3-0 Won Friendly
26. May 28, 1995 Tokyo, Japan  Ecuador 3-0 Won Friendly
27. September 20, 1995 Tokyo, Japan  Paraguay 1-2 Lost Friendly
28. October 24, 1995 Tokyo, Japan  Saudi Arabia 2-1 Won Friendly
29. October 28, 1995 Tokyo, Japan  Saudi Arabia 2-1 Won Friendly
30. February 19, 1996 Hong Kong, China  Poland 5-0 Won Friendly
31. May 26, 1996 Tokyo, Japan  Yugoslavia 1-0 Won Friendly
32. May 29, 1996 Fukuoka, Japan  Mexico 3-2 Won Friendly
33. August 25, 1996 Osaka, Japan  Uruguay 5-3 Won Friendly
34. August 25, 1996 Osaka, Japan  Uruguay 5-3 Won Friendly
35. December 9, 1996 Al Ain, United Arab Emirates  Uzbekistan 4-0 Won 1996 AFC Asian Cup Group Stage
36. March 15, 1997 Bangkok, Thailand  Thailand 1-3 Lost Friendly
37. March 15, 1997 Muscat, Oman  Macau 10-0 Won 1998 FIFA World Cup Qualification
38. March 15, 1997 Muscat, Oman  Macau 10-0 Won 1998 FIFA World Cup Qualification
39. May 21, 1997 Tokyo, Japan  South Korea 1-1 Drew Friendly
40. June 8, 1997 Tokyo, Japan  Croatia 4-3 Won Friendly
41. June 8, 1997 Tokyo, Japan  Croatia 4-3 Won Friendly
42. June 22, 1997 Tokyo, Japan  Macau 10-0 Won 1998 FIFA World Cup Qualification
43. June 22, 1997 Tokyo, Japan  Macau 10-0 Won 1998 FIFA World Cup Qualification
44. June 22, 1997 Tokyo, Japan  Macau 10-0 Won 1998 FIFA World Cup Qualification
45. June 22, 1997 Tokyo, Japan  Macau 10-0 Won 1998 FIFA World Cup Qualification
46. June 22, 1997 Tokyo, Japan  Macau 10-0 Won 1998 FIFA World Cup Qualification
47. June 22, 1997 Tokyo, Japan  Macau 10-0 Won 1998 FIFA World Cup Qualification
48. June 25, 1997 Tokyo, Japan    Nepal 3-0 Won 1998 FIFA World Cup Qualification
49. June 25, 1997 Tokyo, Japan    Nepal 3-0 Won 1998 FIFA World Cup Qualification
50. September 7, 1997 Tokyo, Japan  Uzbekistan 6-3 Won 1998 FIFA World Cup Qualification
51. September 7, 1997 Tokyo, Japan  Uzbekistan 6-3 Won 1998 FIFA World Cup Qualification
52. September 7, 1997 Tokyo, Japan  Uzbekistan 6-3 Won 1998 FIFA World Cup Qualification
53. September 7, 1997 Tokyo, Japan  Uzbekistan 6-3 Won 1998 FIFA World Cup Qualification
54. February 16, 2000 Macau, China  Brunei 9-0 Won 2000 AFC Asian Cup Qualification
55. June 6, 2000 Casablanca, Morocco  Jamaica 4-0 Won Friendly

Honours[edit]

Club[edit]

CRB[22]
Coritiba[22]
Tokyo Verdy[22]
Dinamo Zagreb[22]
Yokohama[22]

International[edit]

Japan[22]

Individual[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "MIURA Kazuyoshi". Japan National Football Team Database. Retrieved 8 January 2013. 
  2. ^ a b Boa Sorte Kazu! - Museum - Profile - Personal Data
  3. ^ "'King Kazu' rewrites record". The Japan Times. Retrieved September 8, 2016. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f Boa Sorte Kazu! - Museum - Profile - Biodata
  5. ^ Asian Football Confederation's Asian Player of the Year winners since 1988
  6. ^ Jsoccer.com - Soccer in Japan - Football News - Japanese Soccer Information
  7. ^ :: National Football Teams ::.. Club - Yokohama FC
  8. ^ J.League Official Site
  9. ^ スカパー!Jリーグ[公式] (2016-08-07), 【ゴール動画】横浜FC 三浦知良選手がJリーグ最年長得点記録を49歳5ヶ月12日に更新!, retrieved 2016-08-08 
  10. ^ "Kobe offer for Kazu". The World Game. SBS. 25 December 2000. 
  11. ^ J.League Official Site
  12. ^ Asian Football Confederation's Asian Player of the Year winners since 1988
  13. ^ Jリーグ公式サイト:2007 JOMO ALLSTAR SOCCER:フォトギャラリー
  14. ^ "Kazuyoshi Miura: Japan legend signs new Yokohama deal at 48". BBC Sport. 11 November 2015. Retrieved 11 November 2015. 
  15. ^ "2017シーズン契約更新のお知らせ". Yokohama FC. 11 January 2017. Retrieved 11 January 2017. 
  16. ^ "Kazuyoshi Miura: Yokohama striker signs contract to play into his 50s". BBC Sport. 11 January 2017. Retrieved 11 January 2017. 
  17. ^ "Japan striker breaks Stan Matthews' record but pleads: Don't compare us!". Stoke Sentinel. Retrieved 7 March 2017. 
  18. ^ "Kazuyoshi Miura scores at 50 to beat Sir Stanley Matthews' record". The Guardian. 13 March 2017. 
  19. ^ "Kazuyoshi Miura, King of Asian Football". FIFA. 24 April 1998. Retrieved 6 April 2015. 
  20. ^ Nippon Sports Kikaku Publishing inc./日本スポーツ企画出版社, "2016J1&J2&J3選手名鑑", 10 February 2016, Japan, ISBN 978-4905411338 (p. 215 out of 289)
  21. ^ Kazuyoshi "Kazu" Miura - Goals in International Matches
  22. ^ a b c d e f "Kazu Miura – Honours". thefinalball. Retrieved 27 February 2017. 

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Takanohana Kōji
Japan Professional Sports Grand Prize Winner
1993
Succeeded by
Ichiro Suzuki