Keens Steakhouse

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Keens Steakhouse
Keens Steakhouse (Manhattan, New York) 001.jpg
Front entrance
Restaurant information
Established1885 (approx)
Street address72 West 36th Street (between Fifth Avenue and Sixth Avenue), in the Garment District in Manhattan
CityNew York City
StateNew York
Postal/ZIP Code10018
CountryUnited States
Coordinates40°45′03″N 73°59′12″W / 40.750854°N 73.986537°W / 40.750854; -73.986537
Patrons in 1910

Keens Steakhouse is a steakhouse restaurant located at 72 West 36th Street (between Fifth Avenue and Sixth Avenue) in the Garment District in Manhattan, New York City.[1] The restaurant houses more than 50,000 smoking pipes, making it one of the largest collections in the world.[2]

History[edit]

The restaurant was founded in 1885 by Albert Keen in Herald Square, what was then the Theater District.[3]

In 2013, Zagats gave it a food rating of 26, and rated it the # 2 restaurant in the Garment District, and the 7th-best steakhouse in New York City.[4]

Keens is the second oldest steakhouse in New York City after the Old Homestead Steakhouse. Keens briefly closed down in 1979.[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Keens Steakhouse". Retrieved September 25, 2014.
  2. ^ Frank Bruni (December 14, 2005). "Where the Lore Is Part of the Lure". New York Times. Retrieved November 26, 2012. Look to the ceilings of various dining rooms, which are spread over two floors of three connected townhouses, and behold row upon row of clay pipes. There are more than 50,000 of them, the property of Keens customers who, in tobacco-friendlier times, stowed and used them in the restaurant.
  3. ^ Bill Schulz. "A Pipe Dream Comes to Life". New York Times. Retrieved November 26, 2012. Starting in 1885, when Albert Keen opened his restaurant and saloon, now known as Keens Steakhouse, the destination has provided post-dinner pipes to the likes of Babe Ruth, Theodore Roosevelt and Buffalo Bill Cody. Keen, who managed the acting and literary society called the Lamb's Club, on West 36th Street, in what was then the theater district, opened up his self-named restaurant next door.
  4. ^ "Keens Steakhouse". Retrieved September 25, 2014.
  5. ^ Kral, Georgia; Levy, Nicole (2018-07-06). "NYC's oldest restaurants will take you back in time". am New York. Retrieved 27 November 2018.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 40°45′03″N 73°59′12″W / 40.75080°N 73.98656°W / 40.75080; -73.98656