Keepmoat

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Keepmoat Homes Ltd
Limited company
Industry Housebuilding
Founded 1931
Headquarters Doncaster, United Kingdom
Key people
James Thomson (Chief Executive Officer)
Tim Beale (Chief Operating Officer and Deputy Chief Executive)
Revenue £1,133.5 million (2016)[1]
£61.4 million (2016)[1]
£62.2 million (2016)[1]
Parent TDR Capital and Sun Capital Partners (UK)
Website www.keepmoat.com

Keepmoat Homes Ltd is a housebuilding company in the United Kingdom that provides private homes for sale. Its headquarters are in Doncaster.

History[edit]

The company was founded in Rotherham by George Bramall and Dick Ogden as Bramall & Ogden in 1931. It acquired Frank Haslam Milan (founded in Doncaster 1928) in 1983 and changed the name of the combined business to Keepmoat.[2] Keepmoat bought Milnerbuild, a Leeds-based social housing repair and maintenance company, in 2010.[3] In 2012, Keepmoat and Apollo merged.[4] In 2014, Keepmoat was acquired by two London-based private equity firms, TDR Capital and Sun Capital Partners (UK).[5][6] ENGIE acquired the regeneration part of the business in February 2017.[7]

Operations[edit]

With an average selling price of £152,000, 72% of the homes Keepmoat sell are to first time buyers, which puts it at the heart of the UK’s need for more quality housing [8]

Sponsorships[edit]

Keepmoat has been the main sponsor of the Keepmoat Stadium in Doncaster since 2006.[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Annual Report 2016" (PDF). Keepmoat. Retrieved 18 March 2017.
  2. ^ "Keepmoat: Our History". keepmoat.com. Retrieved 29 October 2017.
  3. ^ "Keepmoat buys Milnerbuild". building.co.uk. Retrieved 29 October 2017.
  4. ^ "Keepmoat merger with Apollo legally sealed - Construction Enquirer". www.constructionenquirer.com. Retrieved 29 October 2017.
  5. ^ "Keepmoat bought by private equity firms". building.co.uk. Retrieved 29 October 2017.
  6. ^ "Keepmoat". Sun Capital. Retrieved 14 August 2015.
  7. ^ "Keepmoat offloads regeneration arm for £330m". Construction Enquirer. Retrieved 17 May 2017.
  8. ^ https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/fixing-our-broken-housing-market
  9. ^ "Giving the name away: Stadiums named after sponsors". independent.co.uk. 9 October 2012. Retrieved 29 October 2017.

External links[edit]