Keio 3000 series

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Keio 3000 series
Keio3727F.jpg
Inokashira Line 3000 series (refurbished type), May 2006
In service 1962–2011
Manufacturer Tokyu Car
Scrapped 2008-2011
Number built 145 vehicles (29 sets)
Number in service None
Formation 5 cars per trainset
Operator(s) Keio Corporation
Line(s) served Keio Inokashira Line
Specifications
Car body construction Stainless steel
Car length 18.5 m (60 ft 8 in)
Doors 3 per side
Maximum speed 90 km/h (56 mph)
Traction system 120 kW (161 hp) traction motors
Power output 120 kW per motor
Electric system(s) 1,500 V DC
Current collection method Overhead
Track gauge 1,067 mm (3 ft 6 in)

The Keio 3000 series (京王3000系, Keiō 3000-kei) was a DC electric multiple unit (EMU) train type operated by Keio Corporation on the Keio Inokashira Line in Japan from 1962 until 2011.

Design[edit]

The 3000 series was the first Keio rolling stock to use completely stainless steel body construction.[1] A total of 29 5-car sets (145 cars) were built from 1962 by Tokyu Car, and in 1963, the design was the recipient of the third Laurel Prize presented annually by the Japan Railfan Club.[2]

Each trainset featured a livery in one of the seven pastel hues corresponding to a train configuration, a unique feature found only on the Inokashira line. A number of trains were later resold to operate on other lines throughout Japan.

Formation[edit]

The five-car trains were formed of three motored ("M") intermediate cars and two non-powered driving trailer ("Tc") cars as shown below with car 1 at the Kichijoji (western) end.[3]

Car No. 1 2 3 4 5
Designation Tc1 M1 M2 M Tc2
Numbering 3700 3000 3050 3100 3750
  • Each of the motored cars had a single-arm pantograph.[3]
  • Car 3 was designated as a mildly air-conditioned car.[3]

History[edit]

The first trains entered service on the Inokashira Line in 1962.[1] The fleet underwent refurbishment from 1996, with the original fibre-reinforced plastic (FRP) cab ends replaced by new steel cab ends with panoramic windscreens and front skirts.[1]

Withdrawal and resale[edit]

Withdrawal of the 3000 series fleet began in 1996 following the introduction of new 1000 series sets. The last remaining sets were withdrawn by the end of 2011.[1] The withdrawal dates for the later, refurbished sets were as shown below.[4]

Set No. Withdrawal date
3716 4 December 2008
3717 20 May 2009
3718 15 June 2009
3719 26 March 2009
3720 10 November 2008
3721 4 February 2009
3722 23 February 2009
3723 13 July 2009
3724 7 September 2009
3725 14 October 2009
3726 11 November 2009
3727 2 December 2009
3728 6 December 2011[5]
3729 27 June 2011[5]

A number of sets were resold to other private railway companies, including the Hokuriku Railroad, Jomo Electric Railway, Gakunan Railway, Matsumoto Electric Railway (Alpico Kotsu), and Iyo Railway. In 2007, it was announced that former 3000 series EMUs would be resold to the Choshi Electric Railway in Choshi, Chiba, and converted to two-car sets. However, this plan was cancelled due to the cost of converting the 1,500 V DC cars to 600 V DC operation.[6]

Hokuriku Railroad[edit]

Two early, narrow-body 3000 series sets were resold to the Hokuriku Railroad in Kanazawa, Ishikawa, where they became two-car 8800 series sets 8801 to 8802.[7] Later, wide-body sets were also resold to become two-car 7700 series set 7701 and 8900 series sets 8901 to 8903.[7]

Jomo Electric Railway[edit]

Eight 3000 series sets were resold to the Jomo Electric Railway in Gunma Prefecture, where they became two car 700 series sets 711 to 718.[7]

Gakunan Railway[edit]

Five former 3000 series cars were resold to the Gakunan Railway in Fuji, Shizuoka, where they became two-car 8000 series set 8001 and three single-car 7000 series units, 7001 to 7003.[7]

Matsumoto Electric Railway (Alpico Kotsu)[edit]

Four former 3000 series sets were resold to the Matsumoto Electric Railway (present-day Alpico Kotsu) in Nagano Prefecture, where they became two-car 3000 series sets 3001 to 3007.[7]

Iyo Railway[edit]

Ten sets, 3720 to 3729, were resold to the Iyo Railway (Iyotetsu) in Matsuyama, Ehime, where they became three-car 3000 series sets 3301 to 3310.[4][7]

Preserved examples[edit]

Car 3719 is preserved at the Keio Rail-Land open-air museum next to Tama-Dōbutsukōen Station on the Keio Dōbutsuen Line in Hino, Tokyo, which opened in October 2013.[1] Car 3719 was built in 1979 by Tokyo Car, and was withdrawn in March 2009.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f 京王れーるランド [Keio Rail-Land]. Train (in Japanese). Japan: Presse Eisenbahn. 39 (467): 52–55. November 2013. 
  2. ^ ブルーリボン賞・ローレル賞 選定車両一覧 [Blue Ribbon Award & Laurel Prize Winner List] (in Japanese). Japan: Japan Railfan Club. 26 May 2014. Archived from the original on 26 October 2010. Retrieved 28 July 2014. 
  3. ^ a b c 私鉄車両編成表 2011 [Private Railway Rolling Stock Formations - 2011]. Japan: Kotsu Shimbunsha. July 2011. p. 55. ISBN 978-4-330-22711-5. 
  4. ^ a b "京王電鉄井の頭線の車両動向" [Keiō Inokashira Line Fleet Movements], Japan Railfan Magazine, vol. 49 no. 576, p. 64, April 2009 
  5. ^ a b 私鉄車両編成表 2012 [Private Railway Rolling Stock Formations - 2012]. Japan: Kotsu Shimbunsha. July 2012. p. 196. ISBN 978-4-330-29911-2. 
  6. ^ Satō, Toshio (December 2009). 銚子電鉄の電車たちを訪ねて [Visiting the trains of the Choshi Electric Railway]. Japan Railfan Magazine (in Japanese). Vol. 49 no. 584. Japan: Koyusha Co., Ltd. pp. 92–96. 
  7. ^ a b c d e f 私鉄車両編成表 2013 [Private Railway Rolling Stock Formations - 2013]. Japan: Kotsu Shimbunsha. 30 July 2013. pp. 24, 94, 96, 118, 178. ISBN 978-4-330-39313-1.