Keith De Lacy

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The Hon
Keith De Lacy
AM
41st Treasurer of Queensland
In office
7 December 1989 – 19 February 1996
Preceded by Russell Cooper
Succeeded by Joan Sheldon
Constituency Cairns
Member of the Queensland Legislative Assembly
for Cairns
In office
22 October 1983 – 13 June 1998
Preceded by Ray Jones
Succeeded by Desley Boyle
Personal details
Born Keith Ernest De Lacy
(1940-08-07) 7 August 1940 (age 77)
Cairns, Queensland
Political party Australian Labor Party
Alma mater University of Queensland
Occupation Newsagency proprietor, Underground miner, College principal, Tobacco farmer

Keith Ernest De Lacy, AM (born 7 August 1940) is a former Australian politician.[1]

He was born at Cairns and received a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Queensland. He held various jobs, including as a miner, tobacco farmer, newsagency proprietor, college principal and consultant, as well as serving in the Citizen Military Forces from 1958 to 1959. In 1970 he joined the Australian Labor Party's Cairns branch, and in 1983 he was elected to the Queensland Legislative Assembly as the member for Cairns.[1] In 1986 he became Opposition Spokesman on Primary Industries, moving to Finance and Regional Development in 1988.[1] Following Labor's victory at the 1989 state election, De Lacy became Treasurer and Minister for Regional Development.[1] He retired from the Regional Development portfolio in 1990 but remained Treasurer until the government's resignation in 1996. De Lacy retired in 1998.[1]

After politics De Lacy went on to Chair Macarthur Coal [2] which was taken over by Peabody Energy in 2011. Peabody Energy filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in April 2016.[3]

De Lacy also Chaired Nimrod Resources [4] which saw great focus on it when federal government minister Stuart Robert resigned from the Ministry after it was found that he held shares in a company that owned 35 per cent of Nimrod Resources and that he had in August 2014 attended an event in Beijing, China, at which a mining deal between Nimrod Resources and Chinese state-controlled corporation China Minmetals was signed.[5]

De Lacy was chairman of Australia’s most valuable farm, Cubbie Station when it went into administration in 2009.[6]

De Lacy was also Chair of Trinity group which made a $220 million loss in 2009.[7] Trinity group later changed name to Unity Pacific in 2014 and was de-listed from the ASX in 2016.[8]

De Lacy also chaired CEC Group which collapsed in 2011.[9]

De Lacy was also a director of Shale-oil company QLD Energy Resources Limited [10]

In 2016 De Lacy wrote an article for The Australian in which he stated that "Solar and wind simply don't work, not here, not anywhere." [11] He was described at the bottom of the article as the "former Labor treasurer of Queensland", however his positions in and relationships with fossil fuel companies were not disclosed.

Parliament of Queensland
Preceded by
Ray Jones
Member for Cairns
1983–1998
Succeeded by
Desley Boyle

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "Former Members". Parliament of Queensland. 2015. Retrieved 6 February 2015. 
  2. ^ Williams, Perry (2015-06-30). "De Lacy says Peabody Energy 'overpaid' for control of Macarthur Coal". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 2016-12-27. 
  3. ^ "Leading global coal miner Peabody files for bankruptcy". Reuters. 2017-04-13. Retrieved 2016-12-27. 
  4. ^ "Mining has majority’s support: poll | Australian Mining". www.australianmining.com.au. Retrieved 2016-12-27. 
  5. ^ "'Goodnight Irene': Robert resigns in wake of probe into China trip". ABC News. 2016-02-12. Retrieved 2016-12-27. 
  6. ^ "Cubbie Station was never sustainable". Crikey. 2009-10-30. Retrieved 2016-12-27. 
  7. ^ "Troubled times for De Lacy". 2009-08-17. Retrieved 2016-12-27. 
  8. ^ "UNITY PACIFIC GROUP UPG - Profile and Status | deListed Australia". www.delisted.com.au. Retrieved 2016-12-27. 
  9. ^ "Receivers offload large CEC lots". 2011-10-19. Retrieved 2016-12-27. 
  10. ^ "Q&A with Keith De Lacy - Australian Institute of Company Directors". www.companydirectors.com.au. Retrieved 2016-12-27. 
  11. ^ http://www.theaustralian.com.au/opinion/solar-and-wind-power-simply-dont-work--not-here-not-anywhere/news-story/66f188a1399705745abc0f2663a4a9c3.  Missing or empty |title= (help)