Keith Grover

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Keith Grover
Member of the Utah House of Representatives
from the 61st[1] district
Assumed office
January 1, 2007
Preceded by Margaret Dayton
Personal details
Born Provo, Utah
Nationality American
Political party Republican
Residence Provo, Utah
Alma mater Brigham Young University
University of Utah
Website keithgrover.com

Keith Grover[2] (born in Provo, Utah) is an American politician and a Republican member of the Utah House of Representatives. Grover has represented District 61 since January 1, 2007.

Early life and career[edit]

Grover was born in Provo, Utah.[3] As a young man, Grover spent two year proselyting for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) in Paraguay.[4] He later earned his BS from Brigham Young University, and his MEd and EdD from the University of Utah.[3]

Outside of his duties in the legislature, Grover has served as an administrator with the Alpine School District.[4]

Political career[edit]

  • 2006 - Grover originally ran for office when District 61 incumbent Republican Representative Margaret Dayton ran for Utah State Senate and left the seat open. Grover won the 2006 Republican Primary with 1,678 votes (53.5%)[5] and won the three-way November 7, 2006 General election with 4,222 votes (67.1%) against Democratic nominee Susan Chasson (who had run for the seat in 2004) and Constitution candidate Steve Saunders.[6]
  • 2008 - Grover was challenged during the primary election, but was chosen to be the Republican candidate for the November 4, 2008 general election. He won with 7,100 votes (64.5%) against Democratic nominee Deon Turley.[7]
  • 2010 - Grover ran against Democrat Deon Turley for the second time. Grover won the November 2, 2010 general election with 4,374 votes (65.1%) against Turley.[8]
  • 2012 - Grover was unopposed for the June 26, 2012 Republican Primary and won the November 6, 2012 general election with 8,786 votes (78.4%) against Democratic nominee Robert Patterson.[9]
  • 2014 - Grover was unopposed in the June 24, 2014 Republican convention and won the November 4, 2014 general election with 4,414 votes (80.4%) against Democratic nominee Robert Patterson.[10]

During the 2016 legislative session, Grover served on the Higher Education Appropriations Subcommittee, the House Public Utilities, Energy, and Technology Committee, and the House Government Operations Committee. During the interim, Grover served on the Economic Development and Workforce Services Interim Committee and the Public Utilities, Energy, and Technology Interim Committee. He also serves on the State Water Development Commission, and Utah International Relations and Trade Commission.[3]

2016 sponsored legislation[edit]

Bill Number Bill Title Status
HB0196 Unlawful Detainer Revisions Governor Signed - 3/25/2016

Grover floor sponsored SB0001 Higher Education Base Budget, SB0023 Water Law - Protected Purchaser Amendments, SB0044 Construction Code Amendments, SB0062 Jrotc Instructor Amendment, SB0221 Capitol Protocol Amendments, and SJR006 Joint Resolution Recognizing the 100th Anniversary of the JROTC Program.[11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Keith Grover (R)". Salt Lake City, Utah: Utah State Legislature. Retrieved February 5, 2014. 
  2. ^ "Keith Grover". Utah House of Representatives. Retrieved April 5, 2014. 
  3. ^ a b c "Keith Grover". Salt Lake City, Utah: Utah House of Representatives. Retrieved April 11, 2016. 
  4. ^ a b "Keith Grover's Biography". Salt Lake City, Utah: Keith Grover. Retrieved April 5, 2014. 
  5. ^ "Official Results 2006 Primary" (PDF). Salt Lake City, Utah: Lieutenant Governor of Utah. Retrieved February 5, 2014. 
  6. ^ "2006 General Election Results" (PDF). Salt Lake City, Utah: Lieutenant Governor of Utah. Retrieved February 5, 2014. 
  7. ^ "2008 General Election Results". Salt Lake City, Utah: Lieutenant Governor of Utah. Retrieved February 5, 2014. 
  8. ^ "2010 General Election Results". Salt Lake City, Utah: Lieutenant Governor of Utah. Retrieved February 5, 2014. 
  9. ^ "2012 General Canvass Report". Salt Lake City, Utah: Lieutenant Governor of Utah. Retrieved February 5, 2014. 
  10. ^ "2014 Election results". Ballotpedia. Retrieved April 11, 2016. 
  11. ^ "2016 Legislation". Utah State Lesiglature. Retrieved April 11, 2016. 

External links[edit]