Ken Perkins

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Kenneth Perkins
Born (1926-08-15)15 August 1926
Newhaven, East Sussex
Died 23 October 2009(2009-10-23) (aged 83)
Marlborough, Wiltshire
Allegiance United Kingdom United Kingdom
Service/branch Flag of the British Army.svg British Army
Years of service 1946–1982
Rank Major General
Unit Royal Artillery
Commands held 1 Royal Horse Artillery
24 Air Portable Brigade 1969–1970
Commander Sultan of Oman's Armed Forces 1975–1977
Battles/wars Palestine
Suez
Korea
Malaya
Dhofar Rebellion
Northern Ireland
Awards CB
MBE
DFC
DCM (Selangor)
Hashemite Order of Independence
Order of Oman
Other work Defence correspondent for The Sun newspaper

Major General Kenneth Perkins CB MBE DFC (1926–2009) was a British Army officer who became commander of the Sultan of Oman's Armed Forces taking over from General Sir Timothy Creasey.[1][2]

His career highlights included:[3]

  • On 1 November 1947 Ken Perkins was promoted 2nd Lieutenant to Lieutenant.[4]
  • On 15 August 1953 Ken Perkins was promoted to Captain.[5]
  • On 25 October 1955 Captain Ken Perkins DFC (Army number 369841) was awarded the MBE.[6]
  • In 1958 Ken Perkins attended the Pakistani Army staff College in Quetta.[7]
  • On 30 June 1967 Ken Perkins was promoted lieutenant colonel.[8]
  • Between December 1973 and January 1975 Director of Defence Operational Plans(Defence Operations) as a brigadier.
  • On 21 April 1975 Brigadier (Acting Major General) Perkins was confirmed as Major General, with seniority 8 April 1974.[9]
  • Major General Perkins was Commander Sultan of Oman's Armed Force 1975–1977.[10][11]
  • On 16 June 1977 Major General Perkins appointed Assistant Chief of Defence Staff (Operations), Ministry of Defence;[12] and nearing the end of his time in post in 1980[13] he deployed to the infant state of Zimbabwe to try and assist in the integration of the new Zimbabwean Armed Forces, bringing in former anti-Rhodesian rebels with the residual military.[14]
  • The 1977 Silver Jubilee and Birthday Honours made Ken Perkins a Companion of the Bath (CB)
  • At the end of his military career he held the post of Director of Military Assistance Overseas from April 1980 to April 1982.[15]

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Major-General Ken Perkins". The Daily Telegraph. 10 November 2009. Retrieved 15 June 2017. 
  2. ^ Perkins, Ken; with a foreword by Lord Bramall (1988). A fortunate soldier (1st ed.). London: Brassey's Defence Publishers. ISBN 9780080347622. 
  3. ^ "Ken Perkins". The Scotsman. Retrieved 15 June 2017. 
  4. ^ "Supplement to the London Gazette, 26 March 1948" (PDF). Retrieved 15 June 2017. 
  5. ^ "Supplement to The London Gazette, 11 September 1953" (PDF). Retrieved 15 June 2017. 
  6. ^ "Supplement to The London Gazette, 21 October 1955" (PDF). Retrieved 15 June 2017. 
  7. ^ "Comments on General Perkins". armystaffcollege.gov.pk. Retrieved 15 June 2017. 
  8. ^ "Supplement to the London Gazzete, 4 July 1967" (PDF). Retrieved 15 June 2017. 
  9. ^ "Supplement The London Gazette of 21 April 1975" (PDF). Retrieved 15 June 2017. 
  10. ^ McKeown, John. "Dhofar War" (PDF). Retrieved 15 June 2017. 
  11. ^ Worrall, James J. (18 December 2013). "State Building and Counter Insurgency in Oman: Political, Military and Diplomatic Relations at the End of Empire". I.B.Tauris. Retrieved 15 June 2017. 
  12. ^ "SUPPLEMENT TO THE LONDON GAZETTE, 21 June 1977" (PDF). Retrieved 15 June 2017. 
  13. ^ "MINISTRY OF DEFENCE AND TRI-SERVICE SENIOR APPOINTMENTS" (PDF). MoDUK. Retrieved 15 June 2017. 
  14. ^ Kriger, Norma J. (29 May 2003). "Guerrilla Veterans in Post-war Zimbabwe: Symbolic and Violent Politics, 1980–1987". Cambridge University Press. Retrieved 15 June 2017. 
  15. ^ "MINISTRY OF DEFENCE AND TRI-SERVICE SENIOR APPOINTMENTS" (PDF). MoDUK. Retrieved 15 June 2017.