Ken Rinciari

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Ken Rinciari (1935–2010) was an illustrator at The New York Times, The New York Review of Books and other print publications. He was also a photographer and author of children's books and limited edition volumes of other books and stories. Ken was first and foremost an old-fashioned illustrator with great integrity; he drew only for progressive media. He was also a fine writer of self-published and unpublished work.

Drawings have appeared in[edit]

Periodicals - U.S. American Film, The Atlantic Monthly, California Monthly, Children's Digest, Connecticut, Cue, Esquire, Evergreen Revue, Harper's, Mademoiselle, The Nation, Nation's Business, Natural History, New York Magazine, The New Yorker, The Progressive, Saturday Review, San Francisco Focus, Scholastic, Sesame Street, The Smithsonian, Toronto Life, The Washingtonian, Western Humanities Revue, Wharton.

Periodicals - Netherlands Avenue, Haagse Post, Vrij Nederland, De Tijd, Zero.

Newspapers - U.S. New York Daily News, The New York Times, The San Francisco Chronicle, The Washington Post.

Children's Books Houghton Mifflen, MacMillan, Viking.

Animated Films - PBS,WNET TV animation for 'The 51st State.' N.Y., Richard William's Cinema animation for The Guardian Newspaper, London.

Recognition - Certificate of Excellence from the American Institute of Graphic Arts. Citation for Merit from the Society of Illustrators.

Bibliography[edit]

I left New York in September 1976 with the thought that I could always return. I left quite unceremoniously, hardly saying goodbye to my kind Art Director patrons who kept me going over the preceding years, to wit I vainly offer my apologies now over thirty years later. I landed in Amsterdam in the Netherlands and never looked back. I've been away from working professionally seriously since the car accident on July 1, 1980. It took my drawing arm clear off and left it on a little traveled road between Alkmaar and Egmond in the Netherlands where I met the 'Flying Dutchman;' A drunk on the wrong side of the road around the one curve in the road who was out of sight until it was too late. I never saw him. I suddenly heard a car engine that was too close. He was in a big Volvo. I was in my little Citroen CV2 Ducky. Swedish Tank meets French Beer Can. My head went into the windshield causing brain damage affecting the remaining arm. I do not have the control I had with the left hand. I'm working through the problems of drawing that induces lightning bolts of pain from the missing arm that wants to draw, but cannot. It is coming along. The right handed drawings here are designated Right Hand for comparison. They usually take longer than the left handed ones did. Sometimes I manage to pull it off, and sometimes not.

I am damn lucky to be alive thanks to the five good people that the 'Flying Dutchman' had sped past on the road who stopped. They summoned an ambulance that sped me to the local hospital just in time. A twisted up sweater acted as a tourniquet stopping me from bleeding quickly to death. It was close. A long time ago. I owe my life to those anonymous people and the two surgeons summoned back to the Alkmaar hospital that early evening, and the Intensive Care nurses and Ambulance crew, and the gods of twisted sweaters. You can't do everything by yourself. Drawings have appeared in:

Periodicals - U.S. American Film, The Atlantic Monthly, California Monthly, Children's Digest, Connecticut, Cue, Esquire, Evergreen Revue, Harper's, Mademoiselle, The Nation, Nation's Business, Natural History, New York Magazine, The New Yorker, The Progressive, Saturday Review, San Francisco Focus, Scholastic, Sesame Street, The Smithsonian, Toronto Life, The Washingtonian, Western Humanities Revue, Wharton.

Periodicals - Netherlands Avenue, Haagse Post, Vrij Nederland, De Tijd, Zero.

Newspapers - U.S. New York Daily News, The New York Times, The San Francisco Chronicle, The Washington Post.

Children's Books Houghton Mifflen, MacMillan, Viking.

Animated Films - PBS,WNET TV animation for 'The 51st State.' N.Y., Richard William's Cinema animation for The Guardian Newspaper, London.

Recognition - Certificate of Excellence from the American Institute of Graphic Arts. Citation for Merit from the Society of Illustrators.

  • Another Voice [1]
  • The Skin Spinners by Joan Aiken, illustration by Ken Rinciari
  • Whistle in the Graveyard by Ken Rinciari, Maria Leach
  • Happiness is a rat fink by Rochelle Davis, Ken Rinciari

References[edit]

External links[edit]

KEN RINCIARI; LEFT & RIGHT HAND COLLECTION ON VIDEO [LINK]
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iR-b9enodtA&list=PLVJIq2hyDf8rzbW_pFhmYi4uCCkXGwWQN&index=1

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