Kenan

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Keenan
Spouse(s)Mualeleth
ChildrenMahalalel
more sons and daughters
Parent(s)Enos
RelativesSeth (grandfather)

Kenan (also spelled Qenan, Kaynan or Cainan) (Hebrew: קֵינָן, Modern: Qēnan, Tiberian: Qēnān; Arabic: Qāynān قَيْنَان) was a Biblical patriarch first mentioned in the Hebrew Bible Book of Genesis as living before the Great Flood. He is also mentioned in the Genealogy of Jesus in Luke 3:36-37. Additionally, Kenan is also mentioned in Islam in the various collections of tales of the pre-Islamic prophets, which honor him in an identical manner.

A second, postdiluvian Cainan is mentioned in the Septuagint, the Greek translation of the Book of Genesis, in the Book of Jubilees and in the Genealogy of Jesus in Luke 3.

According to Genesis 5:9-14, Kenan was a son of Enosh and a grandson of Seth. Born when Enosh was ninety[1] years old,[2] Kenan fathered Mahalalel when he was seventy.[3][4] Other sons and daughters were born to Kenan before he died at 910 years of age.

According to the Book of Jubilees, Kenan's mother was Noam, wife and sister of Enosh; and Kenan's wife, Mualeleth, was his sister.

Family tree[edit]

The following family tree has been constructed from a variety of biblical and extra-biblical sources:

AdamEve
CainAbelSeth
EnochEnos
IradKenan
MehujaelMahalalel
MethushaelJared
AdahLamechZillahEnoch
JabalJubalTubal-CainNaamahMethuselah
Lamech
Noah
ShemHamJapheth

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ninety according to the Masoretic Text, one hundred ninety according to the Septuagint. Larsson, Gerhard. “The Chronology of the Pentateuch: A Comparison of the MT and LXX.” Journal of Biblical Literature, vol. 102, no. 3, 1983, p. 402. www.jstor.org/stable/3261014.
  2. ^ Genesis 5:9
  3. ^ Genesis 5:12
  4. ^ Seventy according to the Masoretic Text, one hundred seventy according to the Septuagint. Larsson, Gerhard. “The Chronology of the Pentateuch: A Comparison of the MT and LXX.” Journal of Biblical Literature, vol. 102, no. 3, 1983, pp. 402. www.jstor.org/stable/3261014.