Kenichi Hayakawa

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Kenichi Hayakawa
Yonex IFB 2013 - Eightfinal - Kenichi Hayakawa - Misaki Matsutomo — Selena Piek - Jacco Arends 02.jpg
Kenichi Hayakawa at the 2013 French Super Series.
Personal information
Country Japan
Born (1986-04-05) 5 April 1986 (age 33)
Shiga Prefecture, Japan
Height1.77 m (5 ft 10 in)
HandednessRight
Men's doubles
Highest ranking2 with Hiroyuki Endo (June 19, 2014)
BWF profile

Kenichi Hayakawa (早川賢一, born 5 April 1986) is a retired male Japanese badminton player. He has been a runner-up of the All England three times (2013, 2014 and 2016) along with his partner, Hiroyuki Endo. He competed at the 2010 and 2014 Asian Games.[1]

Career[edit]

Hayakawa won the first point in the 2014 Thomas Cup finals with Hiroyuki Endo beating 2004 World Junior Champion Tan Boon Heong and Hoon Thien How and lead the momentum for the Japanese team to claim the Thomas Cup for the first time, being the fourth nation to win Thomas cup after Indonesia, China and Malaysia. He retired in November 2016[2] and currently is the coach for Japanese B national team.[3]

Achievements[edit]

BWF World Championships[edit]

Men's Doubles

Year Venue Partner Opponent Score Result
2015 Istora Senayan,
Jakarta, Indonesia
Japan Hiroyuki Endo China Liu Xiaolong
China Qiu Zihan
16–21, 23–21, 20–22 Bronze Bronze

Badminton Asia Championships[edit]

Men's Doubles

Year Venue Partner Opponent Score Result
2013 Taipei Arena,
Taipei, Chinese Taipei
Japan Hiroyuki Endo South Korea Kim Sa-rang
South Korea Kim Gi-jung
21–19, 13–21, 14–21 Bronze Bronze
2012 Qingdao Sports Centre Conson Stadium,
Qingdao, China
Japan Hiroyuki Endo South Korea Kim Sa-rang
South Korea Kim Gi-jung
12–21, 16–21 Silver Silver

Mixed Doubles

Year Venue Partner Opponent Score Result
2015 Wuhan Sports Center Gymnasium,
Wuhan, China
Japan Misaki Matsutomo Hong Kong Lee Chun Hei
Hong Kong Chau Hoi Wah
17–21, 19–21 Bronze Bronze

BWF Superseries[edit]

The BWF Superseries, launched on 14 December 2006 and implemented in 2007, is a series of elite badminton tournaments, sanctioned by Badminton World Federation (BWF). BWF Superseries has two level such as Superseries and Superseries Premier. A season of Superseries features twelve tournaments around the world, which introduced since 2011, with successful players invited to the Superseries Finals held at the year end.

Men's Doubles

Year Tournament Partner Opponent Score Result
2016 All England Japan Hiroyuki Endo Russia Vladimir Ivanov
Russia Ivan Sozonov
23–21, 18–21, 16–21 2nd, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
2014 French Open Japan Hiroyuki Endo Denmark Mathias Boe
Denmark Carsten Mogensen
21–18, 9–21, 7–21 2nd, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
2014 All England Japan Hiroyuki Endo Indonesia Mohammad Ahsan
Indonesia Hendra Setiawan
19–21, 19–21 2nd, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
2013 China Masters Japan Hiroyuki Endo South Korea Ko Sung-hyun
South Korea Lee Yong-dae
23–25, 19–21 2nd, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
2013 All England Japan Hiroyuki Endo China Liu Xiaolong
China Qiu Zihan
11–21, 9–21 2nd, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
2012 Super Series Masters Finals Japan Hiroyuki Endo Denmark Mathias Boe
Denmark Carsten Mogensen
17–21, 19–21 2nd, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
2012 China Masters Japan Hiroyuki Endo China Chai Biao
China Zhang Nan
18–21, 17–21 2nd, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
     BWF Superseries Finals tournament
     BWF Superseries Premier tournament
     BWF Superseries tournament

BWF Grand Prix[edit]

The BWF Grand Prix has two level such as Grand Prix and Grand Prix Gold. It is a series of badminton tournaments, sanctioned by Badminton World Federation (BWF) since 2007.

Men's Doubles

Year Tournament Partner Opponent Score Result
2014 German Open Japan Hiroyuki Endo Japan Takeshi Kamura
Japan Keigo Sonoda
19–21, 21–14, 14–21 2nd, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
2012 U.S. Open Japan Hiroyuki Endo Japan Yoshiteru Hirobe
Japan Kenta Kazuno
21–15, 21–10 1st, gold medalist(s) Winner
2011 Indonesian Masters Japan Hiroyuki Endo Indonesia Mohammad Ahsan
Indonesia Bona Septano
13–21, 14–21 2nd, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
2011 Russian Open Japan Hiroyuki Endo Japan Naoki Kawamae
Japan Shoji Sato
17–21, 18–21 2nd, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
2011 Australian Open Japan Hiroyuki Endo Japan Naoki Kawamae
Japan Shoji Sato
21–17, 21–18 1st, gold medalist(s) Winner
2010 Australian Open Japan Hiroyuki Endo South Korea Kang Woo-kyum
South Korea Park Tae-sang
21–15, 21–16 1st, gold medalist(s) Winner
2009 German Open Japan Kenta Kazuno South Korea Lee Yong-dae
South Korea Shin Baek-cheol
13–21, 16–21 2nd, silver medalist(s) Runner-up

Mixed Doubles

Year Tournament Partner Opponent Score Result
2012 U.S. Open Japan Misaki Matsutomo United States Tony Gunawan
Indonesia Vita Marissa
13–21, 10–21 2nd, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
     BWF Grand Prix Gold tournament
     BWF Grand Prix tournament

BWF International Challenge/Series[edit]

Mixed Doubles

Year Tournament Partner Opponent Score Result
2007 Victorian International Japan Kenta Kazuno Australia Chad Whitehead
Australia Mark Prior
21–7, 21–15 1st, gold medalist(s) Winner
2007 Banuinvest International Japan Kenta Kazuno Bulgaria Julian Hristov
Bulgaria Konstantin Dobrev
21–10, 21–13 1st, gold medalist(s) Winner

Mixed Doubles

Year Tournament Partner Opponent Score Result
2010 Osaka International Japan Shizuka Matsuo Japan Hirokatsu Hashimoto
Japan Mizuki Fujii
21–14, 21–11 1st, gold medalist(s) Winner
     BWF International Challenge tournament
     BWF International Series tournament

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Profile". Incheon 2014 official website. Archived from the original on 3 October 2014. Retrieved 10 July 2015.
  2. ^ Hearn, Don. "Post-Rio rash of retirements to cut top ten in half". Badzine. Retrieved 5 April 2019.
  3. ^ "2019年 代表選手". badminton.or.jp. Retrieved 5 April 2019.

External links[edit]