Kenneth Carter

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Kenneth Carter
Member of the Rhode Island House of Representatives
from the 31st district
In office
5 January 1993 – 4 January 2011
Succeeded by Doreen Costa
Personal details
Born September 9, 1933
Scottsboro, Alabama
Died January 7, 2017
Saunderstown, Rhode Island
Political party Democratic
Spouse(s) Sylvia A. Clark
Children Kenneth, Michael, Mitchell, and Matthew
Residence North Kingstown, Rhode Island
Profession Restaurateur

Kenneth Carter (born 1933) was an American politician. A member of the Democratic Party, he served in the Rhode Island House of Representatives, representing the 31st District from 1993 to 2011. Carter died on January 7, 2017, in Saunderstown, Rhode Island.[1]

Birth[edit]

Kenneth Carter was born in Scottsboro, Alabama on September 9, 1933.[2]

Family[edit]

Carter was married to Sylvia Clark and together they had four children named Kenneth, Michael, Mitchell, and Matthew.[2]

Personal life and community involvement[edit]

Carter served in the U.S. Navy during the Korean War and owned several restaurants in Narragansett. He also ran the Shriner's Hall in North Kingstown.[3]

Education[edit]

Carter graduated from Jackson County High School in Alabama, where he served as Class President.[4]

Politics[edit]

Kenneth Carter represented District 31 in the Rhode Island House of Representatives from 1993 until 2011. He lost reelection on November 2, 2010, to Republican challenger Doreen Costa, by a margin of 54.2 percent to 45.8 percent.[5] This election coincided with a Republican wave nationally.[6]

Carter was remembered by colleagues, including Costa, for his fairness and civility.[7]

During the 2009-2010 sessions, he served on the House Committee on Finance, and served as Chairman of the House Committee on Veterans Affairs.[8]

Political experience[edit]

Carter has had the following political experience:

Caucuses/Non-Legislative Committees[edit]

Carter has been a member of the following committees:

  • Crime Lab Commission
  • Board of Governors, Higher Education
  • North Kingstown Democratic Town Committee
  • Selective Service Commission[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Kenneth Carter Obituary". Quinn Funeral Homes. Quinn Funeral Homes. Retrieved 5 October 2017. 
  2. ^ a b c d "Kenneth Carter's Biography". Vote Smart. Retrieved 7 September 2012. 
  3. ^ Enright, Matthew. "Passages: Former rep Carter 'gave of himself always'". The Independent. Independent Newspapers. Retrieved 5 October 2017. 
  4. ^ "Kenneth Carter Obituary". Quinn Funeral Homes. Retrieved 5 October 2017. 
  5. ^ "2010 General Election: Representative in General Assembly District 31". Election Results. State of Rhode Island Board of Elections. Retrieved 5 October 2017. 
  6. ^ Kilgore, Ed. ""How the Republicans did it"". New Republic. New Republic. Retrieved 5 October 2017. 
  7. ^ Enright, Matthew. ""Passages: Former rep Carter 'gave of himself always'"". The Independent. Independent Newspapers. Retrieved 5 October 2017. 
  8. ^ "Representative Kenneth Carter". Rhode Island General Assembly. Retrieved 11 December 2010. [permanent dead link]

External links[edit]