Kenneth Kermack

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Kenneth Alexander Kermack
Born 1919
Died 2000
Nationality British
Fields Vertebrate palaeontology
Institutions University College London
Doctoral students Colin Patterson, Brian Gardiner, Susan E. Evans, Tony Thulborn, Jerry Hooker, Rui Cerqueira

Kenneth A. Kermack (1919 – 2000) was a British palaeontologist at University College London most notable for his work on early mammals with his wife, Doris Mary Kermack.[1]

Among Kermack's other significant contributions was the observation that Diplodocus could not have had an aquatic lifestyle because sheer water pressure alone on its chest would have prevented it breathing whilst submerged.[2][3]

He first described the early mammal Aegialodon dawsoni from a molar tooth[4][5] and the docodont Simpsonodon oxfordensis.[6][7] He was also interested in astronomy, elected a member of the British Astronomical Association 1966 February 23,[8] a member until his death.[9]

Selected publications[edit]

  • Kermack, D. M., Kermack, K. A., and Mussett, F. 1968. The Welsh pantothere Kuehneotherium praecursoris. Journal of the Linnean Society of London, Zoology 47:407–423.[10]
  • Kermack, K. A., Mussett, F., and Rigney, H. W. 1973. The lower jaw of Morganucodon. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society 53:87–175.[11]
  • Kermack, K. A., Mussett, F., and Rigney, H. W. 1981. The skull of Morganucodon. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society 71:1–158.[12]
  • Kermack, K. 1989. Hearing in early mammals. Nature 341:568–569.[13]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Zofia Kielan-Jaworowska (12 July 2013). In Pursuit of Early Mammals. Indiana University Press. pp. 80–100. ISBN 978-0-253-00824-4. 
  2. ^ Kermack, K. A. (1951). "LXXX.—A note on the habits of the Sauropods". Journal of Natural History Series 12. 4 (44): 830–832. doi:10.1080/00222935108654213. 
  3. ^ David Lambert; Dorling Kindersley Publishing Staff (1 April 2010). Dinosaur. Dorling Kindersley Limited. pp. 66–. ISBN 978-1-4053-4540-8. 
  4. ^ Kermack, K. A.; Lees, P. M.; Mussett, F. (1965). "Aegialodon dawsoni, A New Trituberculosectorial Tooth from the Lower Wealden". Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. 162 (989): 535–554. doi:10.1098/rspb.1965.0055. 
  5. ^ Jason A. Lillegraven; Zofia Kielan-Jaworowska; William A. Clemens (17 December 1979). Mesozoic Mammals: The First Two-Thirds of Mammalian History. University of California Press. pp. 183–. ISBN 978-0-520-03951-3. 
  6. ^ Kermack, K. A.; Lee, A. J.; Lees, P. M.; Mussett, F. (1987). "A new docodont from the Forest Marble". Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society. 89: 1–39. doi:10.1111/j.1096-3642.1987.tb01342.x. 
  7. ^ Sigogneau-Russell, D. 2001. Docodont nature of Cyrtlatherium, an upper Bathonian mammal from England. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica 46:427–430. http://www.app.pan.pl/article/item/app46-427.html
  8. ^ http://adslabs.org/adsabs/abs/1966JBAA...76..445./
  9. ^ http://articles.adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-iarticle_query?bibcode=2001JBAA..111..273H&db_key=AST&page_ind=0&data_type=GIF&type=SCREEN_VIEW&classic=YES
  10. ^ Kermack, D. M.; Kermack, K. A.; Mussett, F. (1968). "The Welsh pantothere Kuehneotherium praecursoris". Journal of the Linnean Society of London, Zoology. 47 (312): 407–423. doi:10.1111/j.1096-3642.1968.tb00519.x. 
  11. ^ Kermack, K. A.; Mussett, F.; Rigney, H. W. (1973). "The lower jaw of Morganucodon". Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society. 53 (2): 87–175. doi:10.1111/j.1096-3642.1973.tb00786.x. 
  12. ^ Kermack, K. A.; Mussett, F.; Rigney, H. W. (1981). "The skull of Morganucodon". Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society. 71: 1–158. doi:10.1111/j.1096-3642.1981.tb01127.x. 
  13. ^ Kermack, K. (1989). "Hearing in early mammals". Nature. 341 (6243): 568–569. PMID 2797186. doi:10.1038/341568a0.