Kenny Macintyre (political journalist)

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Kenny Macintyre
Portrait of Kenny Macintyre
Portrait
Born (1944-07-19)19 July 1944
Oban
Died 30 May 1999(1999-05-30) (aged 54)
Glasgow
Nationality British
Occupation Political journalist

Kenny Macintyre (19 July 1944 – 30 May 1999) was a Scottish political journalist. Born in Oban, he spent most of his life on Mull, and became a journalist in his 30s. He was known for his work ethic and sense of humour.[1] He was Political and Industrial Correspondent for BBC Scotland for 10 years and was also a keen sportsman. He was a son of Angus Macintyre, a poet[2] and bank manager.[3] Before he entered journalism he was a bank clerk, and ran a gift shop and a building business.[2] He was the father of Colin MacIntyre, the musician, and Kenny Macintyre who is also a BBC journalist.[4] During his career as a journalist, he charmed John Major into giving him an interview by telling him that if he refused, Chelsea F.C. would be defeated.[1] He ambushed Margaret Thatcher by hiding in a hotel cupboard to get an interview with her.[2] He refused an OBE.[5] He died of a heart attack while jogging in Glasgow.[6] Then-prime minister Tony Blair called him "an institution". He also received eulogies from Donald Dewar, Charles Kennedy, Gordon Brown, George Robertson, Alex Salmond, Michael Forsyth and Tam Dalyell.[2] He was buried at Taynuilt with a mobile phone.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Kenny Macintyre: An obituary". BBC Online. 31 May 1999. Retrieved 7 February 2014. 
  2. ^ a b c d "Obituary: Kenny Macintyre". The Independent. 1 June 1999. Retrieved 7 February 2014. 
  3. ^ "Kenny Macintyre". The Guardian. 1 June 1999. Retrieved 7 February 2014. 
  4. ^ "Kenny Macintyre". The Herald (Scotland). 1 June 1999. Retrieved 7 February 2014. 
  5. ^ a b Macintyre, Lorn. "My brother Kenny". Scottish Review. Archived from the original on 21 February 2014. Retrieved 7 February 2014. 
  6. ^ "Kenny Macintyre dies". Broadcast. 4 June 1999. Retrieved 7 February 2014.