Kenosha Unified School District

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Kenosha Unified School District Educational Support Center

Kenosha Unified School District (KUSD) serves the city of Kenosha, the Town of Somers and the village of Pleasant Prairie. KUSD is overseen by a school board of seven elected members whose president is Tamarra Coleman. The superintendent of KUSD is Dr. Sue Savaglio-Jarvis.[1]

KUSD Board of Education[2][edit]

  • Tamarra Coleman - President
  • Mary Snyder - Vice President
  • Dan Wade - Clerk
  • Gary Kunich - Treasurer
  • Mike Falkofske
  • Tony Garcia
  • Rebecca Stevens

Mission statement[edit]

The Kenosha Unified School District's mission is to "provide excellent, challenging learning opportunities and experiences that prepare each student for success." [3]

Schools[edit]

KUSD encompasses 23 elementary schools, five middle schools, five high schools, and five charter schools, although Kenosha School of Technology Enhanced Curriculum has two campuses: East and West.[4] In addition to these, Hillcrest School provides an alternative for expelled middle and high school students who need to address behavioral, as well as academic changes.[5]

Elementary[edit]

  • Bose Elementary
  • Brass Community School
  • Cesar E. Chavez Learning Station
  • Curtis A. Strange Elementary
  • Edward Bain School of Language and Art
  • Forest Park Elementary
  • Frank Elementary
  • Grant Elementary
  • Grewenow Elementary
  • Harvey Elementary
  • Jefferson Elementary
  • Jeffery Elementary
  • McKinley Elementary
  • Nash Elementary
  • Pleasant Prairie Elementary
  • Prairie Lane Elementary
  • Roosevelt Elementary
  • Somers Elementary
  • Southport Elementary
  • Stocker Elementary
  • Vernon Elementary
  • Whittier Elementary
  • Wilson Elementary

Middle[edit]

  • Bullen Middle School
  • Lance Middle School
  • Lincoln Middle School
  • Mahone Middle School
  • Washington Middle School

High schools[edit]

Charter schools[edit]

  • Brompton School (Grades K-8)
  • Dimensions of Learning Academy (Grades K-8)
  • Harborside Academy (Grades 6-12)
  • Kenosha eSchool (Grades K-12)
  • Kenosha School of Technology Enhanced Curriculum (Grades K-8)

Music[edit]

The Kenosha public school orchestra program starts at the fourth-grade level and continues into high school. The concert and symphony orchestras of the city's high schools present fall and spring concerts. In addition, the Tremper High School Golden Strings ensemble has performed throughout the United States and internationally since the early 1970s.[6]

The Orchestra Festival has been a part of Kenosha history since 1963.[7] Typically held in March each year, it showcases student performances at every level. Each year a guest conductor works with all of the ensembles, and awards are presented for music camps, teacher service and financial support, among other achievements.

The Band-O-Rama is a citywide school concert held annually since the mid-1950s,[8] featuring the Kenosha Unified School District's band program, totaling about 1,700 students in grades 5 through 12. As with the Orchestra Festival, the Band-O-Rama features a guest conductor. The show typically begins with an opening fanfare, followed by the National Anthem, after which each grade level is showcased one by one with several selections. At the finale, the massed bands play Sousa's "Stars and Stripes Forever".[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Superintendent, Kenosha Unified School District". Retrieved January 15, 2016. 
  2. ^ "Board Members, Kenosha Unified School District". Retrieved January 15, 2016. 
  3. ^ "About Kenosha Unified School District". Retrieved January 15, 2016. 
  4. ^ "Schools, Kenosha Unified School District". Retrieved January 15, 2016. 
  5. ^ "Welcome to Hillcrest School". Retrieved January 15, 2016. 
  6. ^ Tremper High School Golden Strings
  7. ^ "KUSD News: 48th Annual Orchestra Festival" (PDF). 15 March 2010. Archived from the original (PDF) on 29 November 2011. 
  8. ^ a b "KUSD News: 55th Annual Band-O-Rama Festival" (PDF). 31 Jan 2012. Archived from the original (PDF) on 16 October 2012. 

External links[edit]