Kenric

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Kenric was established in 1965 and is made up of a network of social groups for lesbians throughout the United Kingdom.[1] Members are of all ages, although mainly due to the long-running nature of the network it is most popular with women over 30 years old. It is often the only lesbian social outlet in areas where there is not much visible gay and lesbian presence.

Members[edit]

Throughout the country the local groups are managed by a network volunteers, who organise discos, club nights, walks, reading groups, golf tournaments, discussion groups and other such events to suit the locality. These women are from all walks of life, professions, ages and social backgrounds.

Members of the network keep in touch via a national monthly magazine, as well as regional newsletters. The basic philosophy is that no lesbian should feel isolated or alone, no matter where they are. The group now has over 1200 subscribers, located all over the country and overseas.

Major events[edit]

Each year the organisation hosts major event that include a Christmas ball in London and an event in Eastbourne to mark the end of the International Women's Open tennis tournament. These events are open to women who are both members and non-members.

History[edit]

Many of the early members of Kenric were members of the Gateways club in Chelsea. The name 'Kenric' was formed from joining the regional names of Kensington and Richmond, which is where the group was originally formed in 1965. Some of the early members were also members of the Minorities Research Group (which published the magazine Arena Three,[2] but were keen to move away from research into lesbianism and develop the more social aspects.[3] A former member believes that a group calling themselves The Sisters of Kranzchen may have been forerunners of Kenric.[4]

Newsletter[edit]

Kenric soon started to connect members via a newsletter. Group co-founders Diana Chapman and Esma Langley wrote many of the first articles using a variety of assumed names.[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Haggerty, George E. (2000). Encyclopedia of lesbian and gay histories and cultures. Taylor & Francis. p. 783. ISBN 978-0-8153-1920-7. 
  2. ^ Hall Carpenter Archives Lesbian Oral History Group, Inventing Ourselves: Lesbian Life Stories, Routledge, 1989 ISBN 0-415-02959-7 p37, (interview with Diana Chapman)
  3. ^ Jennings, Rebecca (2007). Tomboys and Bachelor Girls: A Lesbian History of Post-War Britain 1945-71. Manchester University Press. pp. 165–166. ISBN 978-0-7190-7544-5. 
  4. ^ Hall Carpenter Archives Lesbian Oral History Group, Inventing Ourselves: Lesbian Life Stories, Routledge, 1989 ISBN 0-415-02959-7 p38
  5. ^ Hall Carpenter Archives Lesbian Oral History Group, Inventing Ourselves: Lesbian Life Stories, Routledge, 1989 ISBN 0-415-02959-7 p54

External links[edit]