Kent Cooper

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
The gravesite of Kent Cooper

Kent Cooper (March 22, 1880–January 31, 1965) served with the Associated Press (AP) for 41 years, last as executive direct.[1][2]

Background[edit]

Kent Cooper was born on March 22, 1880, in Columbus, Indiana; his father was Democratic U.S. Congressman George W. Cooper.[1][2]

Career[edit]

His father's early death led Cooper to turn his after-school job as reporter for a local newspaper into a full-time job. He became a reporter for the Indianapolis Press newspaper. He joined the Scripps-McRae Press Association (later United Press), established his own news agency, and then returned to Scripps-McRae in a buy-out.[1]

In 1910, Melville Stone, editor of the Associated Press, hied him as traveling inspector. In 1912, he was promoted to chief of traffic. In 1920, he was promoted to assistant general manager.[1] In 1920, he became general manager.[2]

In the late 1920s, Cooper hired AP's first batch of women reporters, including Marguerite Young, who later, as Washington bureau chief for the [Daily Worker]], would introduce Soviet spy Hede Massing to American diplomat Noel Field.[3]

Innovations introduced under his stewardship include use of first, high-speed telegraph printing machines, use of teletype (instead of Morse Code), and introduction of a photograph wire service (by 1935, known as World Wide Photos).[1] By 1929, he had also opened bureaus in London, Paris, and Berlin.[2]

During his 41 years with AP, Cooper's positions included general manager (1925–1943) and finally executive director.

Personal and death[edit]

In 1920, Cooper married Marian Rothwell; they divorced in 1940.[2]

On January 31, 1965, he died in West Palm Beach, Florida. He is buried in Sleepy Hollow Cemetery, Sleepy Hollow, New York.[2]

Legacy[edit]

Cooper Glacier in Antarctica is named for him.

Awards[edit]

In 1941, Cooper received an honorary degree from Indiana University.[2]

Works[edit]

Cooper coined the term "the right to know" with publication of his book The Right to Know (1956).[2]

Books:

  • Barriers Down (1942)
  • Anna Zenger, Mother of Freedom (1946)
  • The Minnesota Strip (1949)
  • The Right to Know (1956)
  • Kent Cooper and the Associated Press: An Autobiography (New York: Random House, 1958)

Articles:

  • "The Future of the AP" (December 1943)[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "Kent Cooper". Encyclopedia Britannica. 22 August 2002. Retrieved 16 January 2017. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h "Kent Cooper". New World Encyclopedia. 19 June 2013. Retrieved 16 January 2017. 
  3. ^ Young, Marguerite (1993). Nothing but the Truth. Carlton. pp. 15 (AP, Byron Price), 16 (Marshall Ballard, Clarke Salmon), 32 (James Williams). Retrieved 25 February 2017. 
  4. ^ "The Future of the AP". Associated Press. 19 June 2013. Retrieved 16 January 2017. 

External links[edit]

  • "Kent Cooper". Encyclopedia Britannica. 22 August 2002. Retrieved 16 January 2017. 
  • "Kent Cooper". New World Encyclopedia. 19 June 2013. Retrieved 16 January 2017.