Kerak telor

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Kerak Telor
Kerak telor Betawi.jpg
CourseSnack
Place of originIndonesia
Region or stateGreater Jakarta
Serving temperatureHot
Main ingredientsSpicy omelette of duck or chicken egg mixed with glutinous rice sprinkled with serundeng coconut granules and fried shallots
Indonesian food that made of egg and Seroundeng and cooked with traditional tools

Kerak telor (English: Egg crust) is a Betawi traditional spicy omelette dish in Indonesian cuisine. It is made from glutinous rice cooked with egg and served with serundeng (fried shredded coconut), fried shallots and dried shrimp as topping.[1] It is considered as a snack and not as a main dish. The vendors of kerak telor are easily the most ubiquitous during annual Jakarta Fair and it has also become a must-have menu item for visitors at the event.[2]

Ingredients and method[edit]

Each of the portion is made by order. The kerak telor vendor puts a small amount of ketan (English: sticky rice) on a small wok pan and heats it on the charcoal fire. He then adds an egg (chicken or duck, but duck eggs are considered more delicious[2]), and some spices and mix it. The dish is fried on a wok without any cooking oil so the omelette will stick on the wok and enable to put it upside down straight against charcoal fire until it is cooked. The spicy serundeng (sweet grated coconut granule) with ebi (dried salted shrimp) and fried shallots are sprinkled upon the omelette.[3]

History[edit]

In the Colonial era, kerak telor was a privileged food and was served in big parties for the colonial government or rich Betawi. According to gastronomy expert Suryatini N. Ganie, kerak telor was created in order to make glutinous rice more tasty and satisfying.[1] In modern day, kerak telor vendors no longer dominated by native Jakartans, some of them come from Padang, Tegal, Garut and Cimahi.[2]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Hulupi, Maria Endah (22 June 2003). "Betawi cuisine, a culinary journey through history". The Jakarta Post. Archived from the original on 14 September 2015.
  2. ^ a b c "Rows of `kerak telor' at fair". The Jakarta Post. 3 July 2009. Retrieved 7 July 2011.
  3. ^ Wahyudi S., Leo (1 July 2002). "'Kerak telor', a traditional Jakarta snack tries to survive". The Jakarta Post. Archived from the original on 11 October 2012. Retrieved 7 July 2011.

External links[edit]