Kevin Nadal

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Kevin Nadal

Ph.D.
Nadal in 2009.jpg
Nadal at Filipino Film Festival
Academic background
Education
Academic work
DisciplinePsychology
InstitutionsJohn Jay College of Criminal Justice, Graduate Center, CUNY
Websitehttp://www.kevinnadal.com

Kevin Nadal is an author, activist, comedian, and professor of psychology. He is a researcher and expert on the effects of microaggressions on racial/ ethnic minorities and lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer people.[1][2] He is a contributor to the Huffington Post and Buzzfeed.

Education & academic career[edit]

Nadal received bachelor's degrees in psychology and political science from the University of California, Irvine, a Master's in counseling from Michigan State University, as well as a Ph.D. in counseling psychology from Columbia University. During his time at Columbia, Nadal was mentored by psychologist Derald Wing Sue. He is currently a full professor at John Jay College of Criminal Justice and The Graduate Center, CUNY.

Dr. Kevin Nadal speaking at the White House Filipino American History Month Celebration in 2016

From 2014 to 2017, Nadal was appointed as the Executive Director of CLAGS: the Center for LGBTQ Studies (formerly known as Center for Lesbian and Gay Studies).[2] From 2015 to 2017, Nadal became the president of the Asian American Psychological Association. In the organization, Nadal also co-founded the Division on Filipino Americans.[3] Nadal is a national trustee of the Filipino American National Historical Society.[4]

Nadal's book Filipino American Psychology: A Handbook of Theory, Research, and Clinical Practice was noted for being the first comprehensive book on Filipino American mental health issues.[5][6][7] Nadal has gone on to release other books on the topic.[8]

Nadal's research and writings concentrate on race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, gender, and the concept of racial microaggressions, and other microaggressions or subtle forms of discrimination towards racial/ethnic minorities, women, and LGBTQ populations.[9] He created and published the Racial and Ethnic Microaggressions Scale in the Journal of Counseling Psychology in 2011.[10] Nadal has also researched "sexual orientation microaggressions"[11] In 2013, Nadal released That's So Gay!' Microaggressions and the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Community.[12][13]

In April 2015, Nadal received John Jay College's Scholarly Excellence Award.[14] In October 2015, Nadal was named one of the Outstanding Filipino Americans of New York for his work in education and research.[15]

Personal life[edit]

Nadal was raised in Fremont, California.[16] During his high school years, Nadal reports being bullied for being gay.[17] Since 2010, he has become vocal about ending bullying in schools.[18]

Social justice advocacy[edit]

Nadal has written or spoken about the need for Filipino Americans to address colorism within their families and communities,[19] the need for people to challenge homophobia and transphobia,[20] the experiences of invisibility and marginalization of Filipino Americans and other "brown Asians" in the general Asian American community,[21] the racial microaggressions LGBTQ people of color experience in dating and sexual relationships,[22] the systemic colorblindness and marginalization of people of color in queer studies,[23] as well as anti-black racism.[24]

In 2007, Nadal gained attention with several media outlets when he started an online petition against ABC Studios for negative statements made about Philippine medical schools on the television show Desperate Housewives.[25][26]

In 2014, Nadal formed the LGBTQ Scholars of Color National Network as a way to provide support for LGBTQ people of color in academia.[27]

In 2016, Nadal and his colleagues wrote an open letter to the New York Times for their lack of Filipino American representation in a video segment that described Filipino American experiences.[28][29][30]

Nadal was also very vocal about addressing racism and Islamophobia in response to the Pulse tragedy in Orlando.[31][32]

In 2017, American Psychologist published Nadal's "Let's Get In Formation": On Becoming a Psychologist-Activist in the 21st Century, where he argued of the ethical responsibility for psychologists to "combat oppression on individual, interpersonal, group, and institutional levels."[33]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Kevin Nadal Faculty Profile at John Jay College".
  2. ^ a b "Kevin Nadal Faculty Profile at The Graduate Center".
  3. ^ "Celebrating the Rapid Growth of Filipino American Psychology".
  4. ^ "FANHS Board of Trustees".
  5. ^ "Aklanon Author, Aklan Forum".
  6. ^ "First Filipino American Psychology Book".
  7. ^ "BakitWhy.com, Kevin Nadal adds author to his resume".
  8. ^ "Bustamante, C. (2005). New York Daily News".
  9. ^ "The Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues Congressional Lunch Seminar".
  10. ^ Nadal, Kevin L. (2011). "Racial and Ethnic Microaggressions Scale". Journal of Counseling Psychology. 58 (4): 470–480. doi:10.1037/a0025193. PMID 21875180.
  11. ^ Nadal, Kevin L.; Issa, Marie-Anne; Leon, Jayleen; Meterko, Vanessa; Wideman, Michelle; Wong, Yinglee (2010-11-30). ""Sexual Orientation Microaggressions: "Death by a Thousand Cuts" for Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Youth"". Journal of Lgbt Youth. 8 (3): 234–259. doi:10.1080/19361653.2011.584204.
  12. ^ Cheng, S.A. (2014). "A Review of "That's so gay! Microaggressions and the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender community"". Journal of Glbt Family Studies. 10 (4): 422–424. doi:10.1080/1550428X.2014.897919.
  13. ^ Nadal, K.; et al. (2016). "Microaggressions Toward Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, and Genderqueer People: A Review of the Literature". The Journal of Sex Research. 53 (4–5): 488–508. doi:10.1080/00224499.2016.1142495.
  14. ^ "John Jay College News".
  15. ^ "2015 Outstanding Filipino Americans of New York".
  16. ^ "Nadal, K. (2016) Why Queer and Trans Studies are Important, Huffington Post". 2016-03-02.
  17. ^ "Kevin Nadal shares in new book the 'immense pain' of being gay and bullied".
  18. ^ "Filipino psychologist tackles bullying".
  19. ^ "Nadal, Kevin (2017, July). The Power of Colorism. Huffington Post". 2017-07-28.
  20. ^ "Nadal, K. (2016, August). Rainbow Profile Pictures Didn't End Homophobia, Huffington Post". 2016-08-18.
  21. ^ Nadal, Kevin L. (2011-03-23). Nadal, K. (2011). Filipino American Psychology. Wiley. ISBN 9781118019771.
  22. ^ "Rodriguez, M. (2015, Sept 15). This Is What It's Like to Log Into Grindr as a Person of Color. Mic".
  23. ^ Nadal, Kevin L. (2016). "The Intersection of Queer Theory and Empirical Methods: Visions for CLAGS, the Center for LGBTQ Studies". Women's Studies Quarterly. 44 (3–4): 301–305. doi:10.1353/wsq.2016.0060.
  24. ^ "Dear Filipino Americans, Let's Talk about Charlottesville". 2017-08-18.
  25. ^ "'Housewives' Filipino joke draws ire".
  26. ^ "Philippine Star. Desperate Housewives Producers Say Sorry to Pinoys".
  27. ^ "LGBTQ Scholars of Color Network Webpage".
  28. ^ "An Open Letter to the New York Times who Told Brown Asians They Don't Matter". 2016-10-15.
  29. ^ "Rodriguez, M. (2016, October 17). South Asians, Filipinos call out lack of inclusion in 'Times' video about racism. Mic".
  30. ^ "Why we celebrate Filipino American History Month". 2016-10-05.
  31. ^ "Orlando Tragedy: A Message of Queer Love from Kevin Nadal, A statement from the executive director of CLAGS: The Center for LGBTQ Studies".
  32. ^ "Grad Center Event Discusses Pulse Aftermath/TheTicker.org".
  33. ^ ""Let's Get In Formation": On Becoming a Psychologist-Activist in the 21st Century"".