Kevin Scott (footballer)

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Kevin Scott
Personal information
Full name Kevin Watson Scott[1]
Date of birth (1966-12-17) 17 December 1966 (age 50)[1]
Place of birth Easington, County Durham, England[1]
Height 6 ft 4 in (1.93 m)
Playing position Defender
Youth career
19??–19?? Middlesbrough
198?–198? Durham City
198?–1984 Newcastle United
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1984–1994 Newcastle United 227 (8)
1994–1997 Tottenham Hotspur 18 (1)
1995 Port Vale (loan) 17 (1)
1996–1997 Charlton Athletic (loan) 4 (0)
1997 Norwich City (loan) 5 (0)
1997–1999 Norwich City 28 (0)
1999 Darlington (loan) 4 (0)
1999–2001 Guisborough Town ? (?)
2001–200? Crook Town ? (?)
Total 303 (10)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.

Kevin Watson Scott (born 17 December 1966) is an English former football defender. He played over 300 games in the Football League for six different clubs.[2]

Starting his career with Newcastle United in 1984, he spent ten years with the club, playing as captain during the 1991–92 season, and helped the club to the Second Division title in 1992–93. A big money move to Tottenham Hotspur followed in February 1994. However, he did not settle at the club, and instead spent the majority of his three years at the club on loan at Port Vale, Charlton Athletic and Norwich City. He made the move to Norwich permanent in 1997, spending two years at the club before leaving the professional game in 1999, shortly after a loan spell with Darlington.

Playing career[edit]

A former youth player at Middlesbrough, he spent just one season with the club before being released.[3] He worked at a paper mill and a lumber factory whilst playing part-time for Durham City.[3] Spotted by Newcastle United manager Jack Charlton, he was part of a youth side that won the FA Youth Cup in 1985, playing alongside the likes of Joe Allon, Gary Kelly, Brian Tinnion and Paul Gascoigne.[3]

He helped Willie McFaul's "Magpies" to a 17th-place finish in the First Division in 1986–87. He scored twice in six appearances in the 1987–88 campaign, before making 36 starts in the 1988–89 relegation season. He then featured 53 times in the 1989–90 season, as new boss Jim Smith led the club to a third-place finish in the Second Division. He started 42 of the club's 46 games in the 1990–91 campaign, and played 50 matches as captain under Osvaldo Ardiles in the disastrous 1991–92 season. New manager Kevin Keegan handed the captaincy to Brian Kilcline, and United went on to win promotion as the division's champions in 1992–93; Scott scored two goals in 56 league and cup appearances.[4] He played 18 top-flight games in the first half of the 1993–94 season, before leaving St James' Park on a £850,000 sale to Tottenham Hotspur in February 1994.[4]

Former Newcastle boss Osvaldo Ardiles was in charge at White Hart Lane, and led "Spurs" to a 15th-place finish in the Premier League in 1993–94. Gerry Francis replaced Ardiles as manager early in the 1994–95 season, and Scott lost his first team place. He signed on loan for John Rudge's Port Vale in January 1995.[1] He helped to shore up the "Valiants" defence, as an upturn in form in the second half of the 1994–95 season saw the Vale rise out of the First Division relegation zone.[1] Rudge wanted to buy Scott, but Vale could not been Tottenham's valuation of £600,000.[4] Tottenham went on to finish tenth in the 1995–96 season, though Scott rarely featured in the first team. Still a peripheral player in the 1996–97 season, he was loaned out to Alan Curbishley's First Division Charlton Athletic, though played just four games at The Valley.

Scott joined Norwich City in February 1997 for a £250,000 fee.[4] Mike Walker's "Canaries" finished 13th in the First Division in 1996–97, and then 15th in 1997–98. Under the stewardship of Bruce Rioch, Norwich finished ninth in 1998–99. However Scott only played 33 first-team games in his time at Carrow Road.[3] He played his last professional game at Feethams on a loan spell with David Hodgson's Third Division club Darlington in February 1999. After leaving Norwich later that year he played numerous games for Northern League sides Guisborough Town and Crook Town.[3]

Post-retirement[edit]

In 2008, Scott was working as a coach at the Middlesbrough F.C. Academy.[5] As of December 2011, he was working as a driving instructor with Loxley driver training.

Statistics[edit]

  • Sourced from Kevin Scott profile at the English National Football Archive (subscription required)
Club Season Division League FA Cup Other Total
Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals
Newcastle United 1986–87 First Division 3 1 0 0 2 0 5 1
1987–88 First Division 4 1 0 0 2 1 6 2
1988–89 First Division 29 0 4 0 4 0 37 0
1989–90 Second Division 42 3 4 1 7 0 53 4
1990–91 Second Division 42 0 1 0 3 1 46 1
1991–92 Second Division 44 1 2 0 4 0 50 1
1992–93 First Division 45 2 4 0 7 0 56 2
1993–94 Premier League 18 0 1 0 2 0 21 0
Total 227 8 16 1 31 2 274 11
Port Vale (loan) 1994–95 First Division 17 1 0 0 0 0 17 1
Charlton Athletic (loan) 1996–97 First Division 4 0 0 0 0 0 4 0
Tottenham Hotspur 1993–94 Premier League 12 1 0 0 0 0 12 1
1994–95 Premier League 4 0 0 0 0 0 4 0
1995–96 Premier League 2 0 0 0 1 0 3 0
Total 18 1 0 0 1 0 19 1
Darlington (loan) 1998–99 Third Division 4 0 0 0 0 0 4 0
Norwich City 1996–97 First Division 9 0 0 0 0 0 9 0
1997–98 First Division 24 0 1 0 1 0 26 0
1998–99 First Division 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0
Total 33 0 1 0 2 0 36 0
Career Total 303 10 17 1 34 2 354 13

Honours[edit]

with Newcastle United

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Kent, Jeff (1996). Port Vale Personalities. Witan Books. p. 260. ISBN 0-9529152-0-0. 
  2. ^ "Kevin Scott". Neil Brown. Retrieved 20 October 2010. 
  3. ^ a b c d e "Kevin Scott Biography". Flown from the Nest. Retrieved 26 December 2009. 
  4. ^ a b c d e Scott, Kenneth H. "Player Details | Kevin Watson Scott | toon1892". toon1892.com. Retrieved 18 October 2016. 
  5. ^ "Boro Win Nike Trophy". Middlesbrough F.C. 12 April 2008. Retrieved 20 October 2010. 

External links[edit]