Key Bank bug sweeping case

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The Key Bank Bug Sweeping Case was an investigation that took place in Tampa, Florida, in 1992. It was believed that the Key Bank Complex in Tampa was involved in money laundering and possible fraud. Law enforcement began a warrant-less investigation and placed several bugging devices and hidden microphones, which were responsible for over 65,000 wiretap intercepts.[1] None of the bank associates or employees were notified of the investigation and thus had no idea it was happening. One of the associates of the bank contacted Michael Peros, a local bug sweep and technical surveillance counter measures (TSCM) expert, to perform a bug sweep of the bank because he feared for the information of the bank’s clients;[2] upon the conclusion of his investigation, Peros discovered over 65,000 illegal bugs and wiretaps at the bank that were being used to monitor activity, including phone calls and monetary transactions.[3]

Peros physically discovered and positively tested one of the bugging devices from the investigation, at which time he was briefly pursued by law enforcement. A local police officer pulled him over for what he claimed was a vehicle license tag violation, but was actually an excuse to search Peros’ vehicle for the bugging device. Higher members of law enforcement, including state agents, also surrounded Peros for retrieval of the bug. When the story made headlines, all evidence gathered by the wiretaps was thrown out by the judge presiding over the case.[1] Peros filed a formal complaint with various government offices. His false vehicle tag violation was later dropped.

Peros was educated in Mechanical Engineering and History at the University of South Florida and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. In addition to his counter-surveillance work, Peros also founded iPray TV, a website which streams live video from the holy sites in Jerusalem.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Sommer, David. "Judge Says Key Bank Phone Taps Went Too Far." Tampa Tribune [Tampa, Florida] 21 Apr. 1993: N. pag. Print.
  2. ^ Sommer, David. "Judge Says Key Bank Phone Taps Went Too Far." Tampa Tribune 21 Apr. 1993: N. pag. Print.
  3. ^ Schwartau, Winn. Information Warfare: Chaos on the Electronic Superhighway. New York City: Thunder's Mouth, PR, 1994. Print.
  • Sommer, David. "Judge Says Key Bank Phone Taps Went Too Far." Tampa Tribune 21 Apr. 1993: N. pag. Print.
  • Stidham, Jeff. "Coe to Consider Dropping Appeals in Key Bank Case." Tampa Tribune 3 July 1993: N. pag. Print.
  • Stidham, Jeff. "Court Approves End of Key Bank Probe." Tampa Tribune 17 Feb. 1994: N. pag. Print.
  • Barroso, Mark. "CL Tampa Vs. Henry Lee Coe, III, State Attorney." Creative Loafing Tampa (Tampa, Florida) 10 June 1993: N. pag. Print.
  • Schwartau, Winn. Information Warfare: Chaos on the Electronic Superhighway. New York City: Thunder's Mouth, PR, 1994. Print.
  • "Key Bank Wiretaps Thrown Out." Simson.net. N.p., n.d. Web. 16 Feb. 2012.

External links[edit]

External video
Bug Sweeps Interview with Michael Peros