Keyport, New Jersey

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Keyport, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Keyport
Nickname(s): "Pearl of the Bayshore"
Map of Keyport in Monmouth County. Inset: Location of Monmouth County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Keyport in Monmouth County. Inset: Location of Monmouth County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Keyport, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Keyport, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°25′56″N 74°12′06″W / 40.432114°N 74.201529°W / 40.432114; -74.201529Coordinates: 40°25′56″N 74°12′06″W / 40.432114°N 74.201529°W / 40.432114; -74.201529[1][2]
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Monmouth
Incorporated April 2, 1908
Government[7]
 • Type Borough
 • Body Borough Council
 • Mayor Harry M. Aumack, II (term ends December 31, 2018)[3][4]
 • Administrator Stephen J. Gallo[5]
 • Clerk Valerie T. Heilweil[6]
Area[1]
 • Total 1.469 sq mi (3.807 km2)
 • Land 1.395 sq mi (3.614 km2)
 • Water 0.074 sq mi (0.193 km2)  5.06%
Area rank 455th of 566 in state
37th of 53 in county[1]
Elevation[8] 26 ft (8 m)
Population (2010 Census)[9][10][11]
 • Total 7,240
 • Estimate (2014)[12] 7,162
 • Rank 312th of 566 in state
23rd of 53 in county[13]
 • Density 5,188.4/sq mi (2,003.3/km2)
 • Density rank 106th of 566 in state
11th of 53 in county[13]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07735[14][15]
Area code(s) 732[16]
FIPS code 3402536810[1][17][18]
GNIS feature ID 0885268[1][19]
Website www.keyportonline.com

Keyport is a borough in Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States. At the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 7,240,[9][10][11] following a decline of 328 (-4.3%) from the 7,568 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 18 (-0.2%) from the 7,586 counted in the 1990 Census.[20] Keyport's nickname is the "Pearl of the Bayshore" or the "Gateway to the Bayshore".[21]

Keyport was originally formed as a Town on March 17, 1870, from portions of Raritan Township (now Hazlet). On April 2, 1908, the Borough of Keyport was formed, replacing Keyport Town.[22]

Keyport is part of the Bayshore Regional Strategic Plan, an effort by nine municipalities in northern Monmouth County to reinvigorate the area's economy by emphasizing the traditional downtowns, dense residential neighborhoods, maritime history, and the natural beauty of the Raritan Bayshore coastline.

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough has a total area of 1.469 square miles (3.807 km2), including 1.395 square miles (3.614 km2) of land and 0.074 square miles (0.193 km2) of water (5.06%).[1][2]

The borough borders the boroughs of Keansburg (via a maritime boundary) and Union Beach, and the townships of Aberdeen and Hazlet to the northeast, southwest and southeast respectively.[23]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1870 2,366
1890 3,411
1900 3,413 0.1%
1910 3,554 4.1%
1920 4,415 24.2%
1930 4,940 11.9%
1940 5,147 4.2%
1950 5,888 14.4%
1960 6,440 9.4%
1970 7,205 11.9%
1980 7,413 2.9%
1990 7,586 2.3%
2000 7,568 −0.2%
2010 7,240 −4.3%
Est. 2014 7,162 [12][24] −1.1%
Population sources:
1870-1920[25] 1870[26][27] 1880-1890[28]
1890-1910[29] 1910-1930[30]
1930-1990[31] 2000[32][33] 2010[9][10][11]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 7,240 people, 3,067 households, and 1,693 families residing in the borough. The population density was 5,188.4 per square mile (2,003.3/km2). There were 3,272 housing units at an average density of 2,344.8 per square mile (905.3/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 80.00% (5,792) White, 7.20% (521) Black or African American, 0.28% (20) Native American, 2.38% (172) Asian, 0.03% (2) Pacific Islander, 7.62% (552) from other races, and 2.50% (181) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 18.26% (1,322) of the population.[9]

There were 3,067 households, of which 23.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 39.7% were married couples living together, 11.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 44.8% were non-families. 37.3% of all households were made up of individuals, and 19.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.35 and the average family size was 3.15.[9]

In the borough, 19.8% of the population were under the age of 18, 8.5% from 18 to 24, 28.9% from 25 to 44, 27.1% from 45 to 64, and 15.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40.5 years. For every 100 females there were 97.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.6 males.[9]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $56,509 (with a margin of error of +/- $7,915) and the median family income was $82,714 (+/- $13,757). Males had a median income of $56,156 (+/- $6,693) versus $41,782 (+/- $4,326) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $28,545 (+/- $2,210). About 4.9% of families and 9.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 14.6% of those under age 18 and 8.0% of those age 65 or over.[34]

Census 2000[edit]

At the 2000 United States Census,[17] there were 7,568 people, 3,264 households and 1,798 families residing in the borough. The population density was 5,358.4 per square mile (2,072.4/km²). There were 3,400 housing units at an average density of 2,407.3 per square mile (931.0/km²). The racial makeup of the borough was 85.2% White, 7.0% African American, 0.12% Native American, 2.22% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 2.96% from other races, and 2.46% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 11.09% of the population.[32][33]

There were 3,264 households of which 25.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 39.4% were married couples living together, 10.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 44.9% were non-families. 38.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 19.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.31 and the average family size was 3.11.[32][33]

21.8% of the population were under the age of 18, 7.3% from 18 to 24, 33.2% from 25 to 44, 21.6% from 45 to 64, and 16.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 93.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.8 males.[32][33]

The median household income was $43,869 and the median family income was $58,176. Males had a median income of $40,324 compared with $34,036 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $23,288. About 4.9% of families and 7.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.7% of those under age 18 and 9.0% of those age 65 or over.[32][33]

Economy[edit]

Keyport waterfront looking out into Raritan Bay

Keyport is known for its oyster industry, which had been one of the world's largest suppliers until overfishing and pollution led to a collapse of the industry in the early to mid 20th century.[35] In August 2010, NY/NJ Baykeeper suspended an effort to recreate the oyster reefs in Keyport's Raritan Bay after the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection cited concerns that the oysters could be harvested and sold to the public despite the persistent heavy pollution in the water after concerns had been raised by the United States Food and Drug Administration that patrols were insufficient to ensure that the oysters in the reef were not being harvested.[36]

It was the home of the Aeromarine Plane and Motor Company which operated from 1914 to 1930 and built seaplanes for the United States Navy during World War I. Its planes were mostly military seaplanes and flying boats, including aircraft that offered some of the first scheduled air service using seaplanes.[37]

Keyport is credited as the birthplace of the "Lazy Susan", designed by William Bedle in 1845.[38] It was the site of the professional dance debut of film star Fred Astaire in 1903 at age four, together with his sister Adele, as part of an act that earned a review that called the duo "the greatest child act in vaudeville.[39]

Businesses[edit]

Keyport is home to many diverse businesses, and has a bustling shopping district located on West Front Street, located one block in from the waterfront. The business district is now under control of the Keyport Bayfront Business Cooperative (which was established in 2011 to replace the now-defunct Keyport Business Alliance) which helps to organize events that benefit the businesses in Keyport as well as the city as a whole.[40]

Keyport is home to Espresso Joe's, a coffee shop and venue for local musical and artistic acts.[41]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Keyport is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The governing body consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at-large on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle.[7] The Borough form of government used by Keyport, the most common system used in the state, is a "weak mayor / strong council" government in which council members act as the legislative body with the mayor presiding at meetings and voting only in the event of a tie. The mayor can veto ordinances subject to an override by a two-thirds majority vote of the council. The mayor makes committee and liaison assignments for council members, and most appointments are made by the mayor with the advice and consent of the council.[42][43]

As of 2015, the Mayor of Keyport is Republican Harry M. Aumack, II, whose term of office ends December 31, 2018. Borough Council Members are Joseph E. Sheridan (D, 2017), Warren J. Chamberlain (R, 2016; elected to serve an unexpired term), Isaiah G. Cooper (D, 2017), Matthew Goode (D, 2015; appointed to serve an unexpired term), Kenneth M. Howe (R, 2016) and Sophia Lamberson (D, 2015).[3][44][45][46][47][48][49]

In June 2015, the Borough Council selected Matthew Goode from a list of three candidates nominated by the Democratic municipal committee to fill the vacant seat expiring December 2015 of Kenneth McPeek, who resigned from office as he was no longer going to be a resident of Keyport. At the same meeting, Joseph Sheridan was selected to succeed McPeek as Council President.[50]

In January 2014, the Borough council selected former councilmember Warren Chamberlain to fill the vacant seat of Clemente Toglia, who had been killed on December 31, 2013, in a car crash before being sworn into office for his second three-year term. Chamberlain served on an interim basis until the November 2014 general election, when he was elected to serve the remaining two years of Toglia's term of office.[51]

Harry Aumack, II, was selected as mayor in April 2013 to fill the vacant seat of Robert McLeod, who had resigned in the previous month citing internal battles within the local Republican party, exemplified by the struggles to fill a council vacancy in late 2012.[52][53] Ken Howe was named in January 2013 to fill the vacant seat that expires at the end of 2013 of Republican Evelyn Ambrose, who resigned in December 2012 as she was relocating to Puerto Rico.[54]

On Election Day, November 7, 2007, Council President Robert Bergen was elected Mayor, taking the seat of two-term incumbent John J. Merla. Merla pled guilty to federal corruption charges on January 18, 2007, for accepting bribes to obtain municipal contracts.[55] Bergen assumed the post of Mayor on January 1, 2007.

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Keyport is located in the 6th Congressional District[56] and is part of New Jersey's 13th state legislative district.[10][57][58]

New Jersey's Sixth Congressional District is represented by Frank Pallone (D, Long Branch).[59] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark, term ends 2021)[60] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus, 2019).[61][62]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 13th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Joseph M. Kyrillos (R, Middletown Township) and in the General Assembly by Amy Handlin (R, Middletown Township) and Declan O'Scanlon (R, Little Silver).[63] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[64] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[65]

Monmouth County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders consisting of five members who are elected at-large to serve three year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats up for election each year as part of the November general election. At an annual reorganization meeting held in the beginning of January, the board selects one of its members to serve as Director and another as Deputy Director.[66] As of 2014, Monmouth County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Lillian G. Burry (R, Colts Neck Township; term ends December 31, 2014),[67] Freeholder Deputy Director Gary J. Rich, Sr. (R, Spring Lake; 2014),[68] Thomas A. Arnone (R, Neptune City; 2016),[69] John P. Curley (R, Middletown Township; 2015)[70] and Serena DiMaso (R, Holmdel Township; 2016).[71][72] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk M. Claire French (Wall Township),[73] Sheriff Shaun Golden (Farmingdale)[74] and Surrogate Rosemarie D. Peters (Middletown Township).[75]

Politics[edit]

On March 23, 2011, there were a total of 4,442 registered voters in Keyport, of which 1,251 (28.2%) were registered as Democrats, 950 (21.4%) were registered as Republicans and 2,240 (50.4%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There was one voter registered to another party.[76]

In the 2012 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 56.6% of the vote (1,664 cast), ahead of Republican Mitt Romney with 42.0% (1,234 votes), and other candidates with 1.4% (42 votes), among the 2,970 ballots cast by the borough's 4,600 registered voters (30 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 64.6%.[77][78] In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 52.1% of the vote (1,759 cast), ahead of Republican John McCain with 44.6% (1,506 votes) and other candidates with 1.7% (56 votes), among the 3,374 ballots cast by the borough's 4,704 registered voters, for a turnout of 71.7%.[79] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 50.0% of the vote (1,649 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 48.4% (1,596 votes) and other candidates with 0.8% (35 votes), among the 3,297 ballots cast by the borough's 4,620 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 71.4.[80]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 67.1% of the vote (1,316 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 30.6% (600 votes), and other candidates with 2.3% (45 votes), among the 2,005 ballots cast by the borough's 4,547 registered voters (44 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 44.1%.[81][82] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 55.2% of the vote (1,284 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 34.3% (796 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 8.0% (185 votes) and other candidates with 1.2% (29 votes), among the 2,324 ballots cast by the borough's 4,544 registered voters, yielding a 51.1% turnout.[83]

Education[edit]

The Keyport Public Schools serve students from pre-Kindergarten through twelfth grade. As of the 2011-12 school year, the district's two schools had an enrollment of 997 students and 98.0 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 10.17:1.[84] Schools in the district (with 2011-12 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[85]) are Keyport Central School[86] (grades PreK–7; 496 students) and Keyport High School[87] (grades 8–12; 501).[88]

Students in public school for ninth through twelfth grades from Union Beach attend the district's high school as part of a sending/receiving relationship with the Union Beach School System.[89][90]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

As of May 2010, the borough had a total of 25.51 miles (41.05 km) of roadways, of which 18.70 miles (30.09 km) were maintained by the municipality, 4.96 miles (7.98 km) by Monmouth County and 1.85 miles (2.98 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[91]

Route 35 and Route 36 both pass through in the southern section. The Garden State Parkway is just outside in both neighboring Aberdeen and Hazlet Townships at Exit 117.

Public transportation[edit]

New Jersey Transit offers local bus service on the 817 route. NJ Transit train service is available nearby at the Hazlet and Aberdeen-Matawan stations on the North Jersey Coast Line.[92][93]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Keyport include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f 2010 Census Gazetteer Files: New Jersey County Subdivisions, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2015.
  2. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  3. ^ a b Keyport Elected Officials, Borough of Keyport. Accessed July 14, 2015.
  4. ^ 2014 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs, as of December 15, 2014. Accessed January 13, 2015. As of date accessed, Aumack is listed as mayor with a 2014 term-end year.
  5. ^ Administration Office, Borough of Keyport. Accessed December 1, 2014.
  6. ^ Clerk's Office, Borough of Keyport. Accessed July 10, 2012.
  7. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 67.
  8. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Keyport, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 7, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Keyport borough, Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 10, 2012.
  10. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 7. Accessed January 6, 2013.
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  14. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Keyport, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed July 10, 2012.
  15. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed August 28, 2013.
  16. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Keyport, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed August 28, 2013.
  17. ^ a b American FactFinder, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  18. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed July 10, 2012.
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  20. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed July 10, 2012.
  21. ^ Monmouth County at a Glance 2006, Monmouth County, New Jersey, pg. 24, accessed December 5, 2006.
  22. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 181. Accessed July 10, 2012.
  23. ^ Areas touching Keyport, MapIt. Accessed January 13, 2015.
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  26. ^ Raum, John O. The History of New Jersey: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Volume 1, p. 252, J. E. Potter and company, 1877. Accessed October 16, 2013. "Keyport is situated on Raritan bay about two miles from Middletown, and twenty two from New York, and is a place of resort for sea bathing in the summer season. From the town can be had a magnificent view of the bay, Staten Island, the Narrows, Sandy Hook, and the Ocean, which, on a pleasant day, exhibits a scene of great beauty studded with its myriad sails. There are numerous oyster beds of the finest quality in Chingarora creek, at this place. Population in 1870, 2,366."
  27. ^ Staff. A compendium of the ninth census, 1870, p. 260. United States Census Bureau, 1872. Accessed December 4, 2012.
  28. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 99. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed December 4, 2012. No population listed for 1880.
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  34. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Keyport borough, Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 10, 2012.
  35. ^ Bria, Amy. "Oysters returned to bay in Keyport", Asbury Park Press, July 9, 2001. Accessed July 10, 2012. "Eighty years ago, Keyport produced more oysters for market than almost anywhere else in the world. But pollution and overfishing led to the depletion of the oyster in Raritan Bay off the shore of Keyport."
  36. ^ Perez-Pena, Richard. "New Jersey Halts Oyster Restoration Project", The New York Times, August 9, 2010. Accessed July 10, 2012. "A decade of efforts to restore marine life to the polluted Raritan Bay suffered a serious setback on Monday when, under orders from the state, an environmental group pulled up the oysters it had cultivated there.But after years of wrangling with the State Department of Environmental Protection, the group, NY/NJ Baykeeper, said it was not surrendering, just beating a tactical retreat."
  37. ^ Staff. "Keyport: A brief history", Asbury Park Press, March 16, 2000. Accessed July 10, 2012. ""Aeromarine Plane and Motor Co. opens a factory in Keyport. It manufactures training planes for the Navy, so-called 'flying boats' used in the first sea-plane passenger service, and the first torpedo bomber."
  38. ^ a b Jeandron, Jack. "Keyport", Arcadia Publishing, 2003, ISBN 0-7385-2439-5, via Google Books, p. 138. Accessed October 7, 2008.
  39. ^ Darrach, Brad. "He Made Us Feel Like Dancing; The Master Is Dead at 88, but His Legacy of Style, Grace, Elegance and Wit Will Long Endure", People (magazine), July 6, 1987. Accessed October 16, 2013. "After less than a year of instruction, billed as the Astaires ('because Austerlitz sounded like a battle'), Adele and Fred made their first professional appearance—in Keyport, N.J. They were paid $50 for a 'split week' and got a socko review in the local weekly: 'The Astaires are the greatest child act in vaudeville.'"
  40. ^ Heumiller, Keith. "Keyport proposes changes to business cooperative", Independent, August 15, 2013. Accessed October 16, 2013. "A number of changes could be coming to the Keyport Bayfront Business Cooperative (KBBC), which manages the borough’s business district.... The KBBC was established in late 2011 after the decertification of the borough’s previous district management corporation — the Keyport Business Alliance (KBA), which borough officials said routinely clashed with the governing body."
  41. ^ Bowes, Kare E. "Duo hopes café will become a hub for artists", Independent, September 21, 2004. Accessed September 23, 2014.
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  50. ^ Uzialko, Adam C. " Keyport Council swears in McPeek’s successor", Independent, July 2, 2015. Accessed July 14, 2015. "In the wake of former councilman Ken McPeek’s resignation, the Borough Council unanimously appointed his successor.At a June 23 meeting of the Keyport Borough Council, Matthew Goode, one of three residents nominated by the local Democratic Committee, was sworn in as the replacement for McPeek, who resigned before moving out of the borough.... Goode’s first official act as a Keyport councilman was to second a motion made by Lamberson to name Councilman Joseph Sheridan as council president, a post that McPeek vacated when he stepped down."
  51. ^ Heumiller, Keith. "Chamberlain selected as Keyport councilman", Independent, January 30, 2014. "The Keyport Republican Club has selected former Borough Councilman Warren Chamberlain to fill the vacancy left on the governing body by the death of Clemente Toglia. Toglia, who died in a car crash on New Year’s Eve, was to be sworn in to his second three-year term on the council on New Year’s Day."
  52. ^ Staff. "Keyport has new mayor", Asbury Park Press, April 3, 2013. Accessed July 11, 2013. "Harry Aumack II is the borough's newly appointed mayor.... He is filling the unexpired term when former Republican Mayor Robert McLeod resigned three weeks ago."
  53. ^ Heumiller, Keith. "Keyport mayor resigns, citing political infighting ", Independent, March 14, 2013. Accessed July 11, 2013. "Mayor Robert McLeod has resigned, citing ongoing political conflicts within his own party as the primary reason."
  54. ^ Heumiller, Keith. "Keyport council selection causes stir with GOPHowe will replace Ambrose through December", Independent, January 24, 2013. Accessed October 16, 2013. "The Keyport Borough Council appointed a new member to the governing body Jan. 15, following a contested selection process that has some local Republicans up in arms. Ken Howe, a chemist who campaigned on the GOP ticket for Borough Council in 2011 and 2012, was selected to replace former Republican Councilwoman Evelyn Ambrose, who resigned in December due to a move to Puerto Rico. Howe will serve for the remainder of 2013."
  55. ^ Quirk, James A.; and Penton, Kevin. Ex-Mayor Bribe Plea: Guilty, Asbury Park Press, January 18, 2007.
  56. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  57. ^ 2014 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 59, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed May 22, 2015.
  58. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  59. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  60. ^ About Cory Booker, United States Senate. Accessed January 26, 2015. "He now owns a home and lives in Newark's Central Ward community."
  61. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate, January 26, 2015. "He currently lives in Paramus and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  62. ^ Senators of the 114th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed January 26, 2015. "Booker, Cory A. - (D - NJ) Class II; Menendez, Robert - (D - NJ) Class I"
  63. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 28, 2014.
  64. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  65. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  66. ^ Monmouth County Government, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  67. ^ Freeholder Lillian G. Burry, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
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