Khalifa al-Ghawil

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Khalifa al-Ghawil
خليفة الغويل
Prime Minister of the National Salvation Government of Libya
In office
14 October 2016 – 16 March 2017*
Preceded byPosition established
Succeeded byFayez al-Sarraj
In office
31 March 2015 – 5 April 2016*[1]
Acting: 31 March 2015 – 1 December 2015
PresidentNouri Abusahmain
Preceded byOmar al-Hassi
Succeeded byFayez al-Sarraj
Personal details
Born1964 (age 54–55)
Alma materUniversity of Benghazi
*Al-Ghawil's premiership is disputed by Abdullah al-Thani and Fayez al-Sarraj.

Khalifa al-Ghawil, sometimes transliterated as Khalifa al-Ghweil (Arabic: خليفة الغويل‎) or Ghwell, is a Libyan politician. He was the prime minister of the General National Congress-led National Salvation Government in Tripoli.[2]

Biography[edit]

Prior to 31 March 2015, Al-Ghawil served as a deputy or aide to Omar al-Hassi, the prime minister of the disputed Tripoli-based government.[2][3] After al-Hassi was fired as head of the GNC, Al-Ghawil was asked to serve as prime minister for one month, on a temporary basis.[2][4]

On 1 December 2015, he formed a new cabinet.

The Prime Minister, of the United Nations supported Government of National Accord (GNA), Fayez al-Sarraj, arrived in Tripoli on 30 March 2016.[5] The following day, it was reported that the GNA has taken control of the prime ministerial offices and that the GNC appointed Prime Minister Khalifa al-Ghawil had fled to Misrata. On 5 April 2016, the National Salvation Government, which had been led by Al-Ghawil, announced that it was disbanding and conceded power to the Presidential Council.[1]

On 14 October 2016, the Presidential Guard revolted in Tripoli and proclaimed allegiance to GNC, took over the building of the High Council of State and announced the comeback of Ghawil cabinet[6][7] Then, fightings occurred between Sarraj loyalists and Ghawil forces.[8][9]

On 5 November 2016, he inaugurated the Power Station in Al Khums, a city controlled by forces loyal to GNS.[10]

The fighting spread to other areas of Tripoli on 14 March.[11] The Pro-GNA forces had recaptured the Guest Palace complex as well as the Rixos hotel. The channel was taken off-air while Khalifa Al-Ghawil was also reported by one of his aides to have been injured in the clashes.[12][13] An agreement called for withdrawal of all armed groups from Tripoli in 30 days.[14]

On 28 May, the 7th Brigade of the Presidential Guard (Al-Kani brigade) from Tarhuna, took over the Tripoli International Airport as a neutral side after Misratan militias loyal to Khalifa Ghwell withdrew from there following two days of heavy clashes.[15] By the next day, the city of Tripoli was fully under control of pro-GNA forces, with all pro-GNC forces withdrawing as a result of clashes with pro-GNA forces.[16]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Tripoli's National Salvation Government quits – Libyan Express". 5 April 2016. Archived from the original on 7 October 2016. Retrieved 16 November 2016.
  2. ^ a b c Daragahi, Borzou (31 March 2015). "Tripoli authority sacks prime minister". Financial Times. Retrieved 31 March 2015.
  3. ^ "Libya crisis: Head of Islamist Tripoli government fired". BBC News. 31 March 2015. Archived from the original on 2 April 2015. Retrieved 31 March 2015.
  4. ^ Daragahi, Borzou (1 April 2015). "Head of Libya's Islamist-backed government rejects dismissal". Financial Times. Retrieved 1 April 2015.
  5. ^ "Support grows for Libya's new unity government". Archived from the original on 19 April 2016. Retrieved 16 November 2016.
  6. ^ "GNC retakes parliament compound, High Council of State condemns – The Libya Observer". Archived from the original on 22 October 2016. Retrieved 16 November 2016.
  7. ^ "Rival group seizes Libya's UN-backed government offices". Archived from the original on 22 October 2016. Retrieved 16 November 2016.
  8. ^ "Clashes erupt in Libyan capital Tripoli – Region – World – Ahram Online". Archived from the original on 22 October 2016. Retrieved 16 November 2016.
  9. ^ "Clashes erupt in Libyan capital". Archived from the original on 16 October 2016. Retrieved 16 November 2016.
  10. ^ "Salvation Government opens Khums Power Station, PC denied access – The Libya Observer". Archived from the original on 11 November 2016. Retrieved 16 November 2016.
  11. ^ "West Tripoli clashes force evacuation of central business area". The Libya Herald. Archived from the original on 7 October 2018. Retrieved 3 December 2018.
  12. ^ "Libya govt forces overrun Tripoli militia headquarters". Agence-France Presse. Arab News. 15 March 2017. Archived from the original on 30 April 2017. Retrieved 3 December 2018.
  13. ^ "Fighting in Libya's capital as one government seizes another's compound". The New York Times. Reuters. 15 March 2017. Archived from the original on 10 November 2018. Retrieved 3 December 2018.
  14. ^ "Ceasefire reached in Tripoli after three days of bloody fighting". Libyan Express. 15 March 2017. Archived from the original on 21 August 2017. Retrieved 3 December 2018.
  15. ^ "Tripoli International Airport taken by Tarhuna brigade, Tajouri rejects". Libya Observer. 28 May 2017. Archived from the original on 3 October 2018. Retrieved 3 December 2018.
  16. ^ "Ghwell said his fighters withdrew to prevent further damage in Tripoli". 29 May 2017. Archived from the original on 3 October 2018. Retrieved 3 December 2018.
Political offices
Preceded by
Omar al-Hassi
Prime Minister of the National Salvation Government of Libya
2015–2016
Succeeded by
Fayez al-Sarraj
Preceded by
Position Re-established
Prime Minister of the National Salvation Government of Libya
2016–2017
Succeeded by
Fayez al-Sarraj