Khalili Collections

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Khalili Collections
Khalili Collections logo.jpg
Khalili Collections logo
Established1970; 49 years ago (1970)[1]
Collection size35,000[1]
FounderNasser D. Khalili
Websitewww.khalilicollections.org Edit this at Wikidata

The Khalili Collections comprise eight distinct art collections assembled by Nasser D. Khalili over five decades. Together, the collections include some 35,000 works of art,[1] and is considered one of the most geographically and culturally diverse collections in the world. The various collections show two themes common to private collections: collecting examples of the highest artistic merit and forming complete series.[2]

Collections[edit]

Islamic Art (700–2000)[edit]

The Khalili Collections includes one of the world’s most comprehensive collections of Islamic art[3][4] and the largest in private hands.[5][6] The Nasser D. Khalili Collection of Islamic Art includes 28,000 objects documenting arts from Islamic lands over a period of almost 1400 years. It was described in 1998 as "one of the largest and most representative collections of Quranic manuscripts in the world"[7] and is the largest private collection.[8][9] Khalili is motivated by a belief that Islamic art is the most beautiful, yet has been underappreciated by the wider world.[2] The collection has been described as presenting art works of interest to Westerners without abstracting them away from the aesthetic standards of Islamic culture.[2] Khalili defines Islamic art as "art produced by Muslim artists for Muslim patrons", and only a minority of the items have an explicitly religious purpose.[2]

In addition to rare and illustrated manuscripts, the collection includes album and miniature paintings,[10] lacquer,[11] ceramics,[12] glass and rock crystal,[13] metalwork,[14] arms and armour,[15] jewellery,[16] carpets and textiles,[17] over 15,000 coins[18] and architectural elements.[19] The ceramic collection, numbering around 2,000 items, has been described as particularly strong in pottery of the Timurid era and also pottery of pre-Mongol Bamiyan.[20] The jewellery collection includes more than 600 rings, many purely decorative but some with religious inscriptions or having a secular function, such as signet rings.[21] Around two hundred objects relate to medieval Islamic science and medicine, including astronomical instruments for orienting towards Mecca, scales and weights, and supposedly magical items intended for medical use.[22]

This collection was the basis in 2008 for the first comprehensive exhibition of Islamic art to be staged in the Middle East, at the Emirates Palace in Abu Dhabi.[6] This was also the largest exhibition of Islamic art held anywhere up to that date.[6] Exhibitions drawing exclusively from the collection have been held at Art Gallery of New South Wales in Sydney, the Institut du Monde Arabe in Paris and the Nieuwe Kerk in Amsterdam as well as at many other museums and institutions worldwide.[23]

Highlights include pages from some of the most famous manuscripts with Persian miniatures, including the Great Mongol Shahnameh (c. 1330s), 10 folios from the Shahnameh of Shah Tahmasp (c. 1520),[24] and 59 folios from the oldest manuscript of the Jami al-tawarikh (1314), Rashid-al-Din’s world history.[25] There is also a 13th century saddle from the era of Gengiz Khan,[26] and an astrolabe commissioned by Shah Jahan (1648–58).[27]

The Wall Street Journal has said that it is the greatest collection of Islamic Art in existence.[3] According to Edward Gibbs, Chairman of Middle East and India at Sotheby’s, it is the best such collection in private hands.[4]

Hajj and the Arts of Pilgrimage (700–2000)[edit]

Alongside the Topkapı Palace museum, the collection is considered the largest and most significant group of objects relating to the cultural history of the Hajj.[28] It holds objects and archival documents from all over the Islamic world, from the Umayyad period to the 21st century. It includes over 300 textiles and many other objects such as coins, medals, miniatures, manuscripts and photographs relating to Mecca and Medina. In total, the collection contains approximately 4,000 objects.[citation needed]

Highlights include a mahmal (AH 1067 (AD 1656–7)) commissioned by the Ottoman Sultan Mehmet IV,[29] coverings for the door of the Kaaba, curtains for the mosque of the Prophet in Medina, covering for the Station of Abraham, the earliest known accurate eyewitness account of Mecca and some of the earliest photographs taken of Mecca and the Hajj by Sadiq Bey.

Aramaic Documents (535BC-324BC)[edit]

A Long List of Supplies Disbursed, Bactria, starts on 15 Sivan, year 7 of Alexander, corresponding to 8 June 324BC

The collection comprises 48 historically significant Aramaic documents from Ancient Bactria, consisting of mainly letters and accounts related to the court of the satrap of Bactria. Together these letters and accounts make up the oldest known correspondence of the administration of Bactria and Sogdiana.[30] The documents, written in Official Aramaic, were likely to originate from the historical city of Balkh and all are dated within a period of less than 30 years, between 353BC to 324BC.[31] The newest of the documents was written during Alexander the Great’s early reign in the region, using the name ‘Alexandros’ (‘Iksndrs’) by which he later became known.[32]

Japanese Art of the Meiji Period (1868–1912)[edit]

The collection of Meiji decorative arts is only comparable in terms of quality and size to the collection of the Japanese Imperial family. It comprises over 1,600 pieces, including metalwork, enamels, lacquer, textiles and ceramics.[33] The Meiji period saw a cultural revolution in Japan where traditional tastes were met with international ones. Since the beginning of Emperor Meiji’s reign in Japan, European and international collectors have sought pieces of Japanese art from this era. Many works in the collections were produced by Imperial Court artists and were exhibited at the Great Exhibitions of the late 19th century.[34]

Highlights include works by imperial court artists Shibata Zeshin, Namikawa Yasuyuki, Makuzi Kozan, Yabu Meizan, Kano Natsuo, Suzuki Chokichi and Shirayama Shosai.[citation needed]

Exhibitions drawing exclusively from the collection have been held at the British Museum, Israel Museum, Van Gogh Museum, Portland Museum, Moscow Kremlin Museums, and at many other museums and institutions worldwide.[23]

Japanese Kimono (1700–2000)[edit]

The collection represents three hundred years of the Japanese textile industry and contains over 450 garments. The garments have been worn to demonstrate gender, age, status and wealth throughout Japan’s history. The core of the collection is made up of kimono from the Edo (1603–1868), Meiji (1868–1912), Taisho (1912–1926) and early Showa (1926–1989) eras.[35][36]

Swedish Textiles (1700–1900)[edit]

Carriage Cushion Cover (Two Lions in Floral Roundels), Sweden, Scania, Bara district, late 18th century

The collection consists mostly of textile panels, cushion and bed covers from the Scania region of southern Sweden, dating in the main from a hundred-year-old period of the mid-18th to mid-19th centuries. The majority of the pieces in the collection were made for wedding ceremonies in the region. While they played a part in the ceremonies, they were also a reflection of the artistry and skill of the weaver. Their designs often consist of symbolic illustrations of fertility and long life. The entire collection is made up of 100 pieces.[23]

Exhibitions drawing exclusively from the collection have been held at the Swedish Cultural Institute in Paris and Boston University Art Gallery.[23]

Spanish Damascene Metalwork (1850–1900)[edit]

One of the largest collections of its kind, the Spanish Metalwork collection pays homage to the Zuloaga family, which played a major part in the preservation of damascening in Spain. The collection contains important pieces created by Plácido Zuloaga between 1834–1910. Some of the pieces, such as a giant iron cassone, were originally acquired by the 19th-century English collector, Alfred Morrison. The entire collection comprises of over 100 pieces[37], 22 of which are signed by Plácido Zuloaga.

Iron Cassone, Spain, Eibar, 1871

At the opening of the Khalili Zuloago exhibition at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, its then Director Alan Borg said it was "a landmark in the study of 19th century Spanish decorative art".[38] Other exhibitions also drawing exclusively from the collection have been held at the Also Fine Arts Museum in Bilbao and Alhambra Palace in Granada.[23]

Enamels of the World (1700–2000)[edit]

The collection consists of over 1300 pieces and showcases the global significance and evolution of enamelling. The uniqueness of the collection lies in its geographic, artistic and historical range, including pieces from China, Japan, Islamic countries and Europe.[39] Highlights include the enamelled chariot belonging to the Indian Maharaja of Bhavnagar and a painted enamel throne table with the seal mark of the 18th century Chinese Qianlong emperor. Other objects include presentation chargers, jewellery, miniatures and ornamental pieces.

At the 2009–10 Enamels of the world exhibition held at the State Hermitage Museum, its Director Mikhail Piotrovsky said "unique in its scope, the Collection reveals the remarkable technical achievements of the enamellers and encourages a greater awareness of the range of their activity."[38]

Publications[edit]

The Khalili Collections will be represented in over 100 publications, including exhibition catalogues, over 70 of which have already been published. The total costs associated with the conservation, research, scholarship and publication of the collections is estimated to be in the tens of millions of pounds.[40]

Islamic Art (700–2000)[edit]

  • Déroche, François (1992). Volume I – The Abbasid Tradition: Qur'ans of the 8th to the 10th centuries AD. The Nour Foundation. ISBN 9781874780519.
  • David James (1992). Volume II – The Master Scribes: Qur'ans of the 10th to 14th centuries AD. The Nour Foundation. ISBN 9781874780526.
  • David James (1992). Volume III – After Timur: Qur'ans of the 15th and 16th centuries. The Nour Foundation. ISBN 9780197276020.
  • Manijeh Bayani; Anna Contadini; Tim Stanley (1999). Volume IV, Part I – The Decorated Word: Qur'ans of the 17th to 19th centuries. The Nour Foundation. ISBN 9780197276037.
  • Manijeh Bayani; Anna Contadini; Tim Stanley (2009). Volume IV, Part II – The Decorated Word: Qur'ans of the 17th to 19th centuries. The Nour Foundation. ISBN 9781874780540.
  • Nabil F. Safwat (1996). Volume V – The Art of the Pen: Calligraphy of the 14th to 20th Centuries. The Nour Foundation. ISBN 9780197276044.
  • Geoffrey Khan (1993). Volume VI – Bills, Letters and Deeds: Arabic Papyri of the 7th to 11th Centuries. The Nour Foundation. ISBN 9781874780564.
  • Deborah Freeman (1993). Volume VII – Learning, Piety and Poetry. Manuscripts from the Islamic world. The Nour Foundation. ISBN 9781874780847.
  • Linda York Leach (1998). Volume VIII – Paintings from India. The Nour Foundation. ISBN 9780197276242.
  • Ernst J. Grube (1994). Volume IX – Cobalt and Lustre: The first centuries of Islamic pottery. The Nour Foundation. ISBN 9780197276075.
  • Ernst J. Grube. Volume X – A Rival to China. Later Islamic pottery. The Nour Foundation. ISBN 9781874780878.
  • Michael Spink. Volume XI – Brasses, Bronze & Silver of the Islamic Lands, Part I and II. The Nour Foundation. ISBN 9781874780885.
  • Francis Maddison (1997). Volume XII – Science, Tools & Magic: Body and Spirit, Mapping the Universe, Part I and Mundane Bodies, Part II. The Nour Foundation. ISBN 9780197276105.
  • Manijeh Bayani (1997). Volume XIII – Seals and Talismans. The Nour Foundation. ISBN 9781874780779.
  • Steven Cohen. Volume XIV – Textiles, Carpets and Costumes, Part I and II. The Nour Foundation. ISBN 9781874780786.
  • Sidney M. Goldstein (2005). Volume XV – Glass: From Sasanian antecedents to European imitations. The Nour Foundation. ISBN 9781874780502.
  • Marian Wenzel (1992). Volume XVI – Ornament and Amulet: Rings of the Islamic Lands. The Nour Foundation. ISBN 9780197276143.
  • Michael Spink; Jack Ogden (2013). Volume XVII – The Art of Adornment: Jewellery of the Islamic lands. The Nour Foundation. ISBN 9781874780861.
  • Pedro Moura Carvalho (2010). Volume XVIII – Gems and Jewels of Mughal India. Jewelled and enamelled objects from the 16th to 20th centuries. The Nour Foundation. ISBN 9781874780724.
  • Robert Darley-Doran; Elisabeth Darley-Doran; Michael L. Bates. Volume XIX – Dinars and Dirhams. Coins of the Islamic lands. The early period, Part I. The Nour Foundation. ISBN 9781874780823.
  • Robert Darley-Doran; Elisabeth Darley-Doran; Michael L. Bates. Volume XX – Dinars and Dirhams. Coins of the Islamic lands. The later period, Part II. The Nour Foundation. ISBN 9781874780830.
  • David Alexander (1992). Volume XXI – The Arts of War: Arms and Armour of the 7th to 19th centuries. The Nour Foundation. ISBN 9781874780618.
  • Nasser D. Khalili; B. W. Robinson; Tim Stanley (1996). Volume XXII – Lacquer of the Islamic Lands, Part I. The Nour Foundation. ISBN 9781874780625.
  • Nasser D. Khalili; B. W. Robinson; Tim Stanley (1997). Volume XXII – Lacquer of the Islamic Lands, Part II. The Nour Foundation. ISBN 9781874780632.
  • Stephen Vernoit (1997). Volume XXIII – Occidentalism. Islamic Art in the 19th Century. The Nour Foundation. ISBN 9780197276204.
  • Ralph Pinder-Wilson; Mitchell Abdul Karim Crites; Rudolf Abraham. Volume XXIV – Monuments and Memorials. Carvings and tile work from the Islamic world. The Nour Foundation. ISBN 9781874780854.
  • Eleanor Sims; Manijeh Bayani; Tim Stanley. Volume XXV, Part I – The Tale and the Image. Illustrated manuscripts and album paintings from Iran and Turkey (Part One). The Nour Foundation. ISBN 9781874780809.
  • J. M. Rogers; Manijeh Bayani. Volume XXV, Part II – The Tale and the Image. Illustrated manuscripts and album paintings from Iran and Turkey (Part Two). The Nour Foundation. ISBN 9781874780816.
  • Shelia Blair (1995). Volume XXVII – A Compendium of Chronicles: Rashid al-Din's illustrated history of the world. The Nour Foundation. ISBN 9781874780656.

Studies in The Khalili Collection – Academic Monographs[edit]

  • Geoffrey Khan (1992). Volume I – Selected Arabic Papyri. The Nour Foundation. ISBN 9781874780663.
  • Svat Soucek (1996). Volume II – Piri Reis and Turkish Mapmaking after Columbus, The Khalili Portolan Atlas. The Nour Foundation. ISBN 9781874780670.
  • Nicolas Sims-Williams (2012). Volume III – (Part One) Bactrian Documents from Northern Afghanistan, Legal and Economic Documents. The Nour Foundation. ISBN 9781874780922.
  • Nicolas Sims-Williams (2007). Volume III – (Part Two) Bactrian Documents from Northern Afghanistan, Letters and Buddhist Texts. The Nour Foundation. ISBN 9781874780908.
  • Nicolas Sims-Williams (2012). Volume III – (Part Three) Bactrian Documents from Northern Afghanistan, Plates. The Nour Foundation. ISBN 9781874780915.
  • Tony Goodwin (2005). Volume IV – Arab-Byzantine Coinage. The Nour Foundation. ISBN 9781874780755.
  • Geoffrey Khan (2007). Volume V – Arabic Documents from Early Islamic Khurasan. The Nour Foundation. ISBN 9781874780717.
  • Nada Chaldecott. Volume VI – Turcoman Jewellery. The Nour Foundation. ISBN 9781874780939.

Aramaic Documents (400 BC – AD 700)[edit]

  • Joseph Naveh; Shaul Shaked (2012). Aramaic Documents from Ancient Bactria. Khalili Family Trust. ISBN 9781874780748.

Japanese Art of the Meiji Period (1868–1912)[edit]

  • Oliver Impey; Malcolm Fairley (1995). Volume I – MEIJI NO TAKARA – Treasures of Imperial Japan; Selected Essays. Kibo Foundation. ISBN 9781874780014.
  • Oliver Impey; Malcolm Fairley (1995). Volume II – MEIJI NO TAKARA – Treasures of Imperial Japan; Metalwork Parts One & Two. Kibo Foundation. ISBN 9781874780021.
  • Oliver Impey; Malcolm Fairley (1995). Volume III – MEIJI NO TAKARA – Treasures of Imperial Japan; Enamel. Kibo Foundation. ISBN 9781874780038.
  • Oliver Impey; Malcolm Fairley; Joe Earle (1995). Volume IV – MEIJI NO TAKARA – Treasures of Imperial Japan; Lacquer Parts One & Two. Kibo Foundation. ISBN 9781874780045.
  • Oliver Impey; Malcolm Fairley (1995). Volume V, Part I – MEIJI NO TAKARA – Treasures of Imperial Japan; Ceramics Part One: Porcelain. Kibo Foundation. ISBN 9781874780052.
  • Oliver Impey; Malcolm Fairley (1995). Volume V, Part II – MEIJI NO TAKARA – Treasures of Imperial Japan; Ceramics Part Two: Earthenware. Kibo Foundation. ISBN 9781874780069.
  • Joe Earle (1995). Volume VI – MEIJI NO TAKARA – Treasures of Imperial Japan; Masterpieces by Shibata Zeshin. Kibo Foundation. ISBN 9781874780083.

Japanese Kimono[edit]

  • Anna Jackson (2015). Kimono: The Japanese Art of Pattern and Fashion. Thames & Hudson. ISBN 9780500518021.

Swedish textile art[edit]

  • Viveka Hansen; Institutet för Kulturforskning (1996). Swedish Textile Art: Traditional Marriage Weavings from Scania: The Khalili Collection. Nour Foundation. ISBN 9781874780076.

Spanish Damascene metalwork[edit]

  • James D. Lavin; Ramiro Larrañaga (1997). The Art and Tradition of the Zuloagas: Spanish Damascene from the Khalili Collection. Khalili Family Trust. ISBN 9781874780113.

Enamels[edit]

  • Haydn Williams (2009). Enamels of the World, 1700-2000: The Khalili Collections. Khalili Family Trust. ISBN 9781874780175.

Exhibitions[edit]

The following exhibitions were drawn exclusively from the Khalili Collections.[23]

Islamic art[edit]

Empire of the Sultans: Ottoman Art from the Khalili Collection

  • July – Sep 1995 Musee Rath, Geneva, Switzerland
  • July – Oct 1996 Brunei Gallery, School of Oriental and African Studies, London, UK
  • Dec 1996 – June 1997 Israel Museum, Jerusalem, Israel
  • Feb – Apr 2000 Society of the Four Arts, Palm Beach, Florida, USA

Marvels of the East: Indian Paintings of the Mughal Period from the Khalili Collection

  • May – July 2000,Tel Aviv Museum of Art, Israel

Empire of the Sultans: Ottoman Art from the Khalili Collection

  • July – Oct 2000 Detroit Institute of Arts, Detroit, Michigan, USA
  • Oct 2000 – Jan 2001 Albuquerque Museum of Art & History, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA
  • Jan – Apr 2001 Portland Art Museum, Portland, Oregon, USA
  • Aug – Oct 2001 Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA
  • Oct 2001 – Jan 2002 Bruce Museum of Arts and Science, Greenwich, Connecticut, USA
  • Feb – Apr 2002 Milwaukee Art Museum, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA
  • May – July 2002 North Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh, North Carolina, USA
  • Aug 2002 – Jan 2003 Museum of Art, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah, USA

Ornements de la Perse: Islamic Patterns in 19th Century Europe

  • Oct – Dec 2002 Leighton House Museum, London, UK

Empire of the Sultans: Ottoman Art from the Khalili Collection

  • Feb – Apr 2003 Oklahoma City Museum of Art, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, USA
  • May – Aug 2003 Frist Center for the Visual Arts, Nashville, Tennessee, USA
  • Aug – Nov 2003 Museum of Arts and Sciences, Macon, Georgia, USA
  • Nov 2003 – Feb 2004 Frick Art and Historical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA

The Arts of Islam: Treasures from the Nasser D. Khalili Collection

  • June – Sep 2007 Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
  • Jan – May 2008 Gallery One, Emirates Palace, Abu Dhabi, UAE
  • Oct 2009 – Mar 2010 Institut du monde arabe, Paris, France

Passion for Perfection: Islamic Art from the Khalili Collection

  • Dec 2010 – Apr 2011 Nieuwe Kerk, Amsterdam, Netherlands

Japanese Art[edit]

Japanese Imperial Craftsmen: Meiji Art from the Khalili Collection

  • Sep 1994 – Jan 1995 British Museum, London, UK

Treasures of Imperial Japan: Ceramics from the Khalili Collection

  • Oct 1994 – Jan 1995 National Museum of Wales, Cardiff, UK

Shibata Zeshin: Masterpieces of Japanese Lacquer from the Khalili Collection

  • Apr – Oct 1997 National Museums of Scotland, Edinburgh, UK

Splendors of Meiji: Treasures of Imperial Japan

  • Apr – Oct 1999 First USA Riverfront Arts Centre, Wilmington, Delaware, USA

Shibata Zeshin: Masterpieces of Japanese Lacquer from the Khalili Collection

  • Oct – Nov 1999 Toyama Sato Art Museum, Toyama, Japan
  • Nov 2000 – Mar 2001 Roemer and Pelizaeus Museum, Hildesheim, Germany

Splendors of Imperial Japan: Arts of the Meiji Period from the Khalili Collection

  • June – Sep 2002 Portland Art Museum, Portland, Oregon, USA

Splendors of Imperial Japan: Masterpieces from the Khalili Collection

  • Sep 2004 – Feb 2005 Israel Museum, Jerusalem, Israel

Wonders of Imperial Japan: Meiji Art from the Khalili Collection

  • July – Oct 2006 Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam, Netherlands

Meiji-Kunst & Japonismus: Aus der Sammlung Khalili

  • Feb – June 2007 Kunsthalle Krems, Krems, Austria

Beyond Imagination: Treasures of Imperial Japan from The Khalili Collection, 19th to early 20th century

  • July – October 2017 Moscow Kremlin Museums, Moscow, Russia

Spanish Damascene Metalwork[edit]

Plácido Zuloaga: Spanish Treasures from The Khalili Collection

  • May 1997 – Jan 1998 Victoria and Albert Museum, London, UK

El Arte y Tradición de los Zuloaga: Damasquinado Español de la Colección Khalili

  • May – Aug 2000 Museo de Bellas Artes, Bilbao, Spain
  • Feb – Apr 2001 Alhambra Palace, Granada, Spain
  • May – Sep 2001 Real Fundacion de Toledo, Toledo, Spain

Plácido Zuloaga: Meisterwerke in gold, silber und eisen damaszener–schmiedekunst aus der Khalili-Sammlung

  • Apr – Aug 2003 Roemer und Pelizaeus Museum, Hildesheim, Germany

Metal Magic: Spanish Treasures from the Khalili Collection

  • Nov 2011 – Apr 2012 Auberge de Provence, Valletta, Malta

Swedish Textiles[edit]

Swedish Textile Art: The Khalili Collection

  • Feb – Mar 1996 IK Foundation, Pildammarnas Vattentorn, Malmo, Sweden

Textiles de Scanie des XVIII et XIX Siècles dans la Collection Khalili

  • Mar – May 2000 Swedish Cultural Centre, Paris, France

A Monument to Love: Swedish Marriage Textiles from the Khalili Collection

  • Sep – Oct 2003 Boston University Art Gallery, Boston, Massachusetts, USA

Enamels of the World[edit]

Enamels of the World 1700–2000 from the Khalili Collection

  • Dec 2009 – Apr 2010 State Hermitage Museum, St Petersburg, Russia

Loans to museums and galleries[edit]

Jan – Apr 1992 Jüdische Lebenswelten, Martin-Gropius-Bau, Berlin, Germany

Nov 1993 – Mar 1994 Worlds Beyond: Death and Afterlife in Art, Cartwright Hall, Bradford, UK

Oct – Nov 1997 The Quick and the Dead: Artists and Anatomy (a touring exhibition organized by the Hayward Gallery for the Arts Council), Royal College of Art, London, UK

June – Sep 1998 Corps à vif: art et anatomie, Musee d’art et d’histoire, Geneva, Switzerland

Oct 1998 – Jan 1999 Royal Persian Paintings: The Qajar Epoch 1785–1925, Brooklyn Museum of Art, New York, New York, USA

Feb – May 1999 Royal Persian Paintings: The Qajar Epoch 1785–1925, Armand Hammer Museum of Art, University of California, Los Angeles, USA

July – Sep 1999 Royal Persian Paintings: The Qajar Epoch 1785–1925, Brunei Gallery, School of Oriental and African Studies, London, UK

Nov 1999 – Feb 2000 Orakel: Der Blikin die Zukunft, Museum Rietberg, Zürich, Switzerland

Dec 1999 – Apr 2000 Earthly Beauty, Heavenly Art: The Art of Islam, Nieuwe Kerk, Amsterdam, Netherlands

May – Oct 2000 La Beauté in natura, Avignon, France

June 2000 – Sep 2001 Earthly Art, Heavenly Beauty: The Art of Islam, State Hermitage Museum, St Petersburg, Russia

Sep 2000 – June 2001 Have a Nargileh: Water-pipes from the Islamic World, Israel Museum, Jerusalem, Israel

Sep 2000 – Feb 2001 Fabergé: Imperial Craftsman and His World, River Front Arts Center, Wilmington, Delaware, USA

Jan –Mar 2001 Court and Conquest: Ottoman Origins and the Design for Handel’s “Tamerlano” at the Glimmer glass Opera, Brunei Gallery, School of Oriental and African Studies, London, UK

Oct 2001 – Apr 2002 Pearls: A Natural History, American Museum of Natural History, New York, New York, USA

Oct 2001 – May 2002 Spirit Of Islam: Experiencing Islam through Calligraphy, Museum of Anthropology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada

Oct 2001 – Mar 2002 L’Orient de Saladin au temps des Ayyubides, Institut du monde arabe, Paris, France

July – Nov 2002 The Nature of Diamonds, Midland Center for the Arts, Midland, Michigan, USA

June 2002 – Jan 2003 Pearls: A Natural History, Field Museum, Chicago, Illinois, USA

Oct 2002 – Feb 2003 The Legacy Of Genghis Khan: Courtly Art and Culture in Western Asia, 1256–1353, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, New York, USA

Nov 2002 – Mar 2003 Chevaux et cavaliers arabes dans les arts d’orient et d’occident, Institut du monde arabe, Paris, France

Nov 2002 – Apr 2003 The Art of Love: Love’s Lust and Sorrow in World Art, Museum Rietberg, Zürich, Switzerland

Apr – July 2003 The Legacy of Genghis Khan: Courtly Art and Culture in Western Asia, 1256–1353, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles, California, USA

Oct 2003 – Jan 2004 Hunt for Paradise: Court Art of Safavid Iran, 1501–76, Asia Society and Museum, New York, New York, USA

Mar – June 2004 A caccia in Paradiso: Arte di corte nella Persia del Cinquencento, Museo Poldi Pezzoli and Palazzo Reale, Milan, Italy

Mar – Aug 2004 Heaven on Earth: Art From Islamic Lands – Selected objects from the Khalili Collection and The State Hermitage Museum, Hermitage Rooms, Somerset House, London, UK

June – Sep 2004 Goa and the Great Mughal, Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation, Lisbon, Portugal

Oct – Dec 2004 Asia, Body, Mind, Spirit, Brunei Gallery, School of Oriental and African Studies, London, UK

Oct 2004 – Jan 2005 Asian Games: The Art of Contest, Asia Society and Museum, New York, New York, USA

Nov 2004 – Mar 2005 The Jews of Europe in the Middle Ages, Historisches Museum Der Pfalz, Speyer, Germany

Dec 2004 – Apr 2005 Iraq and China: Ceramics, Trade and Innovation, Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C., USA

Feb – May 2005 Asian Games: The Art of Contest, Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C., USA

Apr – Aug 2005 The Jews of Europe in the Middle Ages, Deutsches Historisches Museum, Berlin, Germany

Sep – Dec 2005 Asian Games: The Art of Contest, Middlebury College Museum of Art, Middlebury, Vermont, USA

Oct 2005 – Mar 2006 L’Aged’or des sciences arabes, Institut du monde arabe, Paris, France

May – Sep 2006 Ibn Khaldun, The Mediterranean in the 14th century: Rise and Fall of Empires, Real Alcazar, Seville, Spain

Sep 2006 – Feb 2007 East-West: Objects Between Cultures, Tate Britain, London, UK

Oct 2006 – Feb 2007 Venise et l’Orient 828 – 1797, Institut du monde arabe, Paris, France

Mar – July 2007 Moments of Vision: Venice and the Islamic World, 828 – 1797, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, New York, USA

July – Nov 2007 Venezia e l’Islam 828 – 1797, Palazzo Ducale, Venice, Italy

Feb – June 2009 Shah ‘Abbas: The remaking of Iran, British Museum, London, UK

Mar – Jun 2010 The Indian Portrait: 1560–1860, National Portrait Gallery, London, UK

Sep 2010 – Jan 2011 Epic of the Persian Kings: The Art of Ferdowsi’s Shahnameh, Mellon Gallery, Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, UK

Oct 2010 – Mar 2011 Al-Mizan: Sciences and Arts in the Islamic World, Museum of the History of Science, Oxford, UK

Dec 2010 – Feb 2011 India’s Fabled City: The Art of Courtly Lucknow, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles, California, USA

Jul – Sep 2010 Kyoto–Tokyo: from Samurai to Manga, Grimaldi Forum, Monaco

Apr – July 2011 Une cour royale en Inde: Lucknow (XVIIIème –XIXème siècle), Musée national des arts asiatiques-Guimet, Paris, France

June – Sep 2011 Gifts of the Sultan: The Arts of Giving at the Islamic Courts, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles, California, USA

Oct 2011 – Jan 2012 Gifts of the Sultan: The Arts of Giving at the Islamic Courts, Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Texas, USA

Jan – Apr 2012 Hajj: Journey to the Heart of Islam, British Museum, London, UK

Mar – June 2012 Gifts of the Sultan: The Arts of Giving at the Islamic Courts, Museum of Islamic Art, Doha, Qatar

Sep – Dec 2012 Bronze, Royal Academy of Arts, London, UK

Sep 2013 – Mar 2014 Longing for Mecca: The Pilgrim’s Journey, Rijksmuseum Volkenkunde, Leiden, Netherlands

Oct – Dec 2013 The Everlasting Flame: Zoroastrianism in History and Imagination, Brunei Gallery, School of Oriental and African Studies, London, UK

Feb – May 2014 Court and Craft in Medieval Mosul: A Masterpiece from Northern Iraq, Courtauld Institute of Art, London, UK

Mar – Jun 2014 Kings and Pawns: Board Games from India to Spain, Museum of Islamic Art, Doha, Qatar

Apr – Jul 2014 India: Jewels that enchanted the world, Moscow Kremlin Museums, Moscow, Russia

Apr – Aug 2014 Hajj: le pèlerinage à La Mecque, Institut du monde arabe, Paris, France

Sep 2014 – Jan 2015 Sacred Places, Sacred Books, Museum Aan de Stroom, Antwerp, Belgium

Sep 2014 – Jan 2015 Ming: 50 Years that changed China, British Museum, London, UK

Oct 2015 – Jan 2016 The Fabric of India, Victoria and Albert Museum, London, UK

Apr – Sep 2016 Jardins d’Orient: De l’Alhambra au Taj Mahal, Institut du monde arabe, Paris, France

Apr – July 2016 Court & Cosmos: The Great Age of the Seljuqs, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, USA

Apr – Aug 2016 Sicily: culture and conquest, British Museum, London, UK

Sep 2016 – Jan 2017 Jerusalem 1000–1400: Every People Under Heaven, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, USA

Oct 2016 – Jan 2017 Power and Protection: Islamic Art and the Supernatural, Ashmolean Museum, Oxford, UK

Nov 2016 – Feb 2017 Aventuriers des mers: de Sindbad à Marco Polo. Méditeranée – Océan Indien, Institut du monde arabe, Paris, France

Apr – July 2017 Trésors de l’Islam en Afrique de Tomboctou à Zanzibar, Institut du monde arabe, Paris, France

June – Oct 2017 Aventuriers des mers: de Sindbad à Marco Nov Polo. Méditeranée – Océan Indien, Musée des civilisations de l’Europe et de la Méditerranée (MuCEM), Marseiile, France

Sep 2017 – Mar 2018 Hajj: Memories of a Journey, Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque, Abu Dhabi, UAE

Oct 2018 – Jan 2019 Splendours of Imperial Japan, Guimet Museum, Paris, France

Oct 2018 – Jan 2019 Fabric of India, The Cincinnati Art Museum, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA

Oct 2018 – Feb 2019 Relieken, Museum Catharijneconvent, Utrecht, The Netherlands

Feb 2019 – Jan 2020 Longing for Mecca, Tropenmuseum, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

References[edit]

Definition of Free Cultural Works logo notext.svg This article incorporates text from a free content work. Licensed under CC-BY-SA 4.0 The Khalili Collections, Khalili Foundation, To learn how to add open license text to Wikipedia articles, please see this how-to page. For information on reusing text from Wikipedia, please see the terms of use.

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  30. ^ Aramaic documents from ancient Bactria (fourth century BCE.) from the Khalili collections. Naveh, Joseph,, Shaked, Shaul,, Khalili, Nasser D.,, Khalili Family Trust,. London. 2012. pp. x. ISBN 1874780749. OCLC 818222949.CS1 maint: extra punctuation (link) CS1 maint: others (link)
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External links[edit]