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In Islam, a khatib, khateeb or hatib (Arabic خطيب khaṭīb) is a person who delivers the sermon (khuṭbah) (literally "narration"), during the Friday prayer and Eid prayers.[1]

The khatib is usually the imam (prayer leader), but the two roles can be played by different people. There are no requirements of eligibility to become a khatib, although the person must be a male who has attained the age of puberty. It is also required that the khatib be in a state of physical purity (wuḍūʼ).

Women may be khateebahs. Edina Lekovic gave the inaugural khutba at the Women's Mosque in 2015.[2][3]

See also[edit]


  1. ^ "The Ethical Soundscape". Retrieved 19 January 2015. 
  2. ^ Street, Nick (3 February 2015). "First all-female mosque opens in Los Angeles". Al-Jazeera. Retrieved 2017-06-30. 
  3. ^ Lekovic, Edina (2015-06-26). "How I became The Women's Mosque of America's first khateebah - altM". altM. Retrieved 2017-06-30.