Khirbat Al-Dumun

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Al-Dumun
Al-Dumun is located in Mandatory Palestine
Al-Dumun
Al-Dumun
Arabic خربة الدامون
Name meaning Duweimîn, the little dôm trees, a kind of Zizyphus[1]
Also spelled Khirbet al Damun[2]
Subdistrict Haifa
Coordinates 32°43′58″N 35°01′20″E / 32.73278°N 35.02222°E / 32.73278; 35.02222Coordinates: 32°43′58″N 35°01′20″E / 32.73278°N 35.02222°E / 32.73278; 35.02222
Palestine grid 152/237
Population 340[3][4] (1945)
Area 2,797 dunams
Date of depopulation April 30, 1948[2]
Cause(s) of depopulation Fear of being caught up in the fighting
Secondary cause Military assault by Yishuv forces

Al-Dumun was a Palestinian Arab village in the Haifa Subdistrict. It was depopulated during the 1947–1948 Civil War in Mandatory Palestine on April 30, 1948. It was located 10.5 km southeast of Haifa.

History[edit]

A known cave located in the area was used as a sheep fold. Flints artefacts from the cave had been dated to the Neolithic period.[5]

In 1881 the Palestine Exploration Fund's Survey of Western Palestine noted at Duweimin “foundations."[6]

British Mandate era[edit]

In the 1922 census of Palestine conducted by the British Mandate authorities, Al Damun had a population of 19 Muslims,[7] while in the 1931 census, it was counted under Isfiya.[8]

In 1945 the village had a population of 340 Muslims,[3] and the total land area was 2,797 dunams.[4] Of this, 5 dunams were used for citrus and bananas, 280 were for plantations and irrigable land, 1,619 for cereals,[9] while 893 dunams were non-cultivable land.[10]

1948, aftermath[edit]

At the end of April, 1948, the villagers surrounded without a fight, and the village was garrisoned by the Haganah. The villagers were, at first, allowed to stay.[11] Morris notes that part of the document stating this has been blacked out by the IDF censors, presumably, according to Morris, as the writer have suggested that the villagers were to be expelled.[12]

In 1992, the remains were described: "All that remains from the village is a building now used as a prison. Cactuses and few remaining fruit trees, such as pomegranate and almond trees, grown on the site. The land is forested and the area is currently used by Israelis for recreation."[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Palmer, 1881, p. 109
  2. ^ a b Morris, 2004, p. xviii village #384. Also gives causes of depopulation
  3. ^ a b Department of Statistics, 1945, p. 14
  4. ^ a b Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 48
  5. ^ a b Khalidi, 1992, p. 159
  6. ^ Conder and Kitchener, 1881, SWP I, p. 303
  7. ^ Barron, 1923, Table XI, Sub-District of Haifa, p. 33
  8. ^ Mills, 1932, p. 92
  9. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 91
  10. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 141
  11. ^ Morris, 2004, p. 209, note 305
  12. ^ Note 305, Morris, 2004, p. 283

Bibliography[edit]

External links[edit]