Khita

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Khita
𒄭𒋫𒀀
Ruler of Elam
Alliance Naram-Sin Awan Louvre Sb8833.jpg
Probable treaty of alliance between Naram-Sin and Khita of Susa, king of Awan, c. 2250, Susa, Louvre Museum.[1][2]
Reignc. 2100 BCE
PredecessorHelu
SuccessorKutik-Inshushinak
DynastyKings of Elam
Khita ruled from Susa

Khita, sometimes Hita in Elamite (𒄭𒋫𒀀 hi-ta-a),[3] was governor of Susa and the 11th king of the Awan Dynasty of Elam, around 2280 BCE.[4][3][5] He was most likely the grandfather of the famous Elamite ruler Kutik-Inshushinak, who succeeded him on the throne.[6]

Elam had been under the domination of Akkad, at least temporarily, since the time of Sargon.[7] Khita is probably recorded as having signed a peace treaty with Naram-Sin of Akkad, stating: "The enemy of Naram-Sin is my enemy, the friend of Naram-Sin is my friend".[5][8][9] The inscription was discovered in Susa.[9] It has been suggested that the formal treaty allowed Naram-Sin to have peace on his eastern borders, so that he could deal more effectively with the threat from Gutium.[5]

Further study of the treaty suggests that Khita provided Elamite troops to Naram-Sin, that he married his daughter to the Akkadian king, and that he agreed to set up statues of Naram-Sin in the sanctuaries of Susa.[5] As a matter of fact, it is well known that Naram-Sin had extreme influence over Susa during his reign, building temples and establishing inscriptions in his name, and having the Akkadian language replace Elamite in official documents.[4]

This inscription is the first known official document in the Elamite language, but using the Akkadian cuneiform script.[3] It was set up in the temple of Inshushinak in Susa.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hansen, Donald P. (2002). Leaving No Stones Unturned: Essays on the Ancient Near East and Egypt in Honor of Donald P. Hansen. Eisenbrauns. p. 233. ISBN 978-1-57506-055-2.
  2. ^ "Site officiel du musée du Louvre". cartelfr.louvre.fr.
  3. ^ a b c d Leick, Gwendolyn (2001). Who's Who in the Ancient Near East. Psychology Press. p. 70. ISBN 978-0-415-13231-2.
  4. ^ a b Edwards, I. E. S.; Gadd, C. J.; Hammond, N. G. L. (1971). The Cambridge Ancient History. Cambridge University Press. pp. 444-445. ISBN 978-0-521-07791-0.
  5. ^ a b c d Edwards, I. E. S.; Gadd, C. J.; Hammond, N. G. L. (1971). The Cambridge Ancient History. Cambridge University Press. p. 651. ISBN 978-0-521-07791-0.
  6. ^ Leick, Gwendolyn (2001). Who's Who in the Ancient Near East. Psychology Press. pp. 95–96. ISBN 978-0-415-13231-2.
  7. ^ Gershevitch, I. (1985). The Cambridge History of Iran. Cambridge University Press. p. 8. ISBN 978-0-521-20091-2.
  8. ^ Hansen, Donald P. (2002). Leaving No Stones Unturned: Essays on the Ancient Near East and Egypt in Honor of Donald P. Hansen. Eisenbrauns. p. 233. ISBN 978-1-57506-055-2.
  9. ^ a b "Site officiel du musée du Louvre". cartelfr.louvre.fr.
Preceded by
Helu
King of Elam
2240–2220 BC
Succeeded by
Kutik-Inshushinak