Khofifah Indar Parawansa

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Khofifah Indar Parawansa
Kabinet Kerja Khofifah Indar Parawansa.jpg
Governor of East Java
elect
Assuming office
12 February 2019
President Joko Widodo
Deputy Emil Dardak
Succeeding Soekarwo
Minister of Social Affairs
In office
27 October 2014 – 17 January 2018
President Joko Widodo
Preceded by Salim Segaf Al-Jufri
Succeeded by Idrus Marham
Minister of Female Empowerment and Child Protection
In office
26 October 1999 – 9 August 2001
President Abdurrahman Wahid
Preceded by Tutty Alawiyah
Succeeded by Sri Redjeki Sumarjoto
Deputy Speaker of the Indonesian House of Representatives
In office
1 October 1999 – 26 October 1999
President Bacharudin Jusuf Habibie
Abdurrahman Wahid
Preceded by Syarwan Hamid
Succeeded by Muhaimin Iskandar
Personal details
Born Khofifah Tegistha
(1965-05-19) 19 May 1965 (age 53)
Indonesia Surabaya, East Java, Indonesia
Citizenship Indonesian
Nationality  Indonesia
Political party National Awakening Party
Spouse(s)
Indar Parawansa
(m. 1992; d. 2014)
Children Fatimahsang Mannagalli Parawansa
Ali Mannagali Parawansa
Yusuf Mannagali Parawansa
Jalaluddin Mannagali Parawansa
Alma mater Airlangga University (dra.)
University of Indonesia (M.I.P.)
Cabinet Development Reform Cabinet
National Unity Cabinet
Working Cabinet

Khofifah Tegistha Indar Parawansa (born 19 May 1965) is an Indonesian politician who served as the 27th Minister of Social Affairs.[1] She resigned from the position in January 2018 in order to run in the East Java gubernatorial election.[2]

She had previously served as the fifth Minister for Female Empowerment, as well as the chairwoman of the Family Planning Board in the National Unity Cabinet, and was also a former Deputy Speaker of the Indonesian House of Representatives. She was the first member of parliament who gave formal critical speech toward Soeharto regime, highlighting 1997 General Election fraud during 1998 General Session of People's Consultative Assembly.[3][4]

She was elected chairwoman of the Muslimat, an Islamic women's group affiliated to Nahdlatul Ulama (NU), for the 2000-2005 period, and reelected three times, most recently in 2016 for the 2016-2021 period.[5][6]

In August 2015, she launched the "2015 Prostitution-Free National Movement" during a working visit to Jayapura, West Papua. The Tanjung Elmo red-light district located in Sentani, West Papua, was to be closed down. Commercial sex workers were to be sent back to their hometowns and given Rp5 million (about US$500) from the Social Affairs Ministry in addition to another Rp5 million given by the Jayapura provincial government, in order to find "decent jobs".[7] In early 2016, she announced the government aimed to shut down 100 red-light districts by 2019 in a bid to eradicate prostitution. As of February 2016, 68 red-light districts had been closed down.[8]

In response to homophobic rhetoric from some officials and religious preachers, Khofifah on 16 January 2016 told the House of Representatives that the Social Affairs Ministry does not acknowledge the categorization or term "LGBT" (lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender) but only recognizes "people living with HIV/AIDS and minorities". She said the ministry's task is "to restore the respective social behaviors of men and women", an effort which "needs to be maximized in order to go back to the way it was before".[9]

Responding to the Jakarta November 2016 protests by Muslim groups and extremists against the city's Christian and ethnic Chinese governor Basuki Tjahaja Purnama, Khofifah as well as Indonesian National Armed Forces Commander Gatot Nurmantyo, Indonesian National Police Tito Karnavian and Islamic activist Yenny Wahid marched in support of interfaith unity.[10][11]

Early life[edit]

Khofifah was born on 19 May 1965 in Surabaya, East Java.[12]

Personal life[edit]

She was married to Indar Parawansa (also rendered as Parawangsa), also known by the name Daeng Beta (born on 26 July 1960 in Palu, Sulawesi). Khofifah has four children, a daughter and three sons: called Fatimahsang Mannagalli Parawansa, Jalaluddin Mannagalli Parawansa, Yusuf Mannagalli Parawansa and Ali Mannagalli Parawansa.[13]

References[edit]

  1. ^ (in Indonesian) Profile at Merdeka.com.
  2. ^ Pratiwi, Priska Sari (9 January 2017). "Khofifah Resmi Mundur dari Mensos Usai Sah Jadi Cagub Jatim". CNN Indonesia. Retrieved 18 January 2018.
  3. ^ "Khofifah, Dilahirkan sebagai Pelayan Masyarakat". Muslimat NU Online (in Indonesian). 30 October 2014. Retrieved 27 June 2018.
  4. ^ "Profil Khofifah Indar Parawansa". Tirto.id (in Indonesian). Retrieved 27 June 2018.
  5. ^ Media, Kompas Cyber (25 November 2016). "Khofifah Kembali Pimpin Muslimat NU". KOMPAS.com (in Indonesian).
  6. ^ "Khofifah Kembali Pimpin Muslimat NU - Cetak ANTARA News". Antaranews.com. Retrieved 8 December 2016.
  7. ^ "Lokalisasi Tanjung Elmo yang Terbesar di Jayapura Tamat, PSK Dipulangkan". detiknews (in Indonesian). 21 August 2015. Retrieved 8 December 2016.
  8. ^ "Indonesia Disiapkan Bebas Lokalisasi Tahun 2019". Beritasatu.com (in Indonesian). 22 February 2016. Retrieved 8 December 2016.
  9. ^ "Menteri Khofifah Sebut Tugas Kemensos Kembalikan LGBT ke Fungsi Sosial - Tribunnews.com". Tribunnews.com (in Indonesian). 16 January 2016. Retrieved 8 December 2016.
  10. ^ Police Chief Calls for National Unity. Tempo, 30 November 2016. Accessed 5 December 2016.
  11. ^ Tia Asmara, Indonesians Rally for Unity in Military-Backed Demonstrations. Benar News, 30 November 2016. Accessed 5 December 2016.
  12. ^ "Khofifah Indar Parawansa - Profil | merdeka.com". Merdeka.com (in Indonesian). Retrieved 8 December 2016.
  13. ^ "Bahagiakan dan Lindungi Anak Indonesia - Pontianak Post". Pontianak Post (in Indonesian). 24 July 2016. Retrieved 8 December 2016.