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Khukhrain

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Khukhrain
Khokhrain
Profile
Region Punjab
Ethnicity Punjabi
Khukhrain has no chief, and is an armigerous clan
Historic seat Bhera

The Khukhrain or Khokhrain[1] is a clan composed of eight septs of the Khatri caste that originally hailed from the areas of the Salt Range and particularly the town of Bhera in Punjab. The clan is descended from the 12th century Hindu ruler of Lahore, Khokhar Anand.[2] The clan is noted for assassinating Mohammad Ghauri. [3]

Battle of Bhera

The Khukhrains spread over Khushab, Dhune Kheb, Chakwal, Pind Dadan Khan, Peshawar, Nowshera and Lahore.[4] They were a powerful tribe during the attacks of Mahmud of Ghazni and resisted him during his third invasion after the defeat of Jayapala at the Battle of Bhera in 1004-5. Bhera was the Khukhrain capital.[5]

When Bhera was sacked by Mahmud of Ghazni, the Khukhrain king, Biji Rai preferred to commit suicide using his dagger rather than submit to Ghazni.[4] Jaipal's son, Anandapala, received support of the Khukhrains against Ghazni in 1008-9 at Wahind.[6]

Religious beliefs

The Khukhrain clan was originally Hindu. Later clan members embraced Sikhism and Islam. Khukhrains of all these faiths collectively form one kinship. In Pakistan there continues to be a large number of Muslim Khukhrains living specially in the Pakistani Punjab.. Some scholars such as Muhammad Ikrām Chutai believe that a number of Khukhrains were converted to Islam by the Sufi Baba Farid [7]

Khokran and Khokhars

Encyclopaedia Britannica notes that: "The Khokharain sub group of the 52 claims descent from a son of Manu but it is possibly named from the Khokhar Rajputs and several clan names are traced to military."[8]

See also

References

  1. ^ http://www.tribuneindia.com/2011/20110108/saturday/above.htm
  2. ^ http://www.dawn.com/news/1056656
  3. ^ http://www.tribuneindia.com/2011/20110108/saturday/above.htm
  4. ^ a b The Panjab Past and Present By Punjabi University Dept. of Punjab Historical Studies Published by Dept. of Punjab Historical Studies, Punjabi University., 1981 Page 195
  5. ^ The Panjab Past and Present By Punjabi University Dept. of Punjab Historical Studies Published by Dept. of Punjab Historical Studies, Punjabi University., 1981 Page 200)
  6. ^ The Panjab Past and Present By Punjabi University Dept. of Punjab Historical Studies Published by Dept. of Punjab Historical Studies, Punjabi University., 1981 page 201}
  7. ^ Babaji: Life and Teachings of Farid-ud Din Ganj-i Shakar By Muhammad Ikrām Chutai Page 433 Published by Sang-e-Meel Publications, 2006
  8. ^ Britannica: A New Survey of Universal Knowledge By Walter Yust Published by Encyclopaedia Britannica, 1952 Page 980