Kid Prince Moore

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"Kid" Prince Moore was an American blues musician, from the United States, who recorded 17 songs from 1936 to 1938. Moore played in a Piedmont blues style, similar to that of Blind Blake. Moore also recorded two Gospel Music tracks, "Church Bells" and "Sign of Judgement". Moore also accompanied blues pianist Shorty Bob Parker on six of his own tracks.[1][2] Bruce Bastin, in his book Red River Blues: The Blues Tradition in the Southeast, suggested that Moore may have originated from The Carolinas but, as of 2017, there is no documented knowledge of Moore's life.

Recordings[edit]

Recorded April 8, 1936, in New York for Melotone Records[edit]

  • "Mississippi Water" - Unissued[1]
  • "Bite Back Blues" - Unissued
  • "Pickin' Low Cotton" (Take 1) - Unissued
  • "Pickin Low Cotton" (Take 2) - Unissued
  • "Bug Juice Blues" - 18971=2

Recorded April 10, 1936, in New York for Melotone Records[edit]

  • "Church Bells" - 18988
  • "Sign of Judgement" - 18989[3]

Recorded April 11, 1936, in New York for Melotone Records[edit]

  • "South Bound Blues" - Unissued
  • "Honey Dripping Papa" - 18999[3]
  • "Market Street Rag" (Take 1) - Unissued
  • "Market Street Rag" (Take 2) - Unissued

Recorded June 6, 1938 in Charlotte, North Carolina for Decca Records[edit]

Accompanied by Shorty Bob Parker on all tracks

  • "Talkin' About the Snuff" - 64056 (Acc. by Shorty Bob Parker)
  • "That's Lovin' Me" - 64057
  • "Sally Long Blues" - 64058
  • "Ford V-8 Blues" - 64059
  • "Single Man Blues" - 64060
  • "Bear Meat Blues" - 64061[3]

Accompanying Shorty Bob Parker[edit]

  • "Death of Slim Green" - 64052
  • "I'm Through With Love" - 64053
  • "Ridin' Dirty Motorsickle" - 64054
  • "Tired of Being Drug Around" - 64055
  • "Rain And Snow" - 64062
  • "So Cold In China" - 64063[4][5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Bruce Bastin (1995). "Red River Blues: The Blues Tradition in the Southeast". University of Illinois Press. Retrieved 2016-12-13.
  2. ^ Paul Oliver (2009). "Barrelhouse Blues: Location Recording and the Early Traditions of the Blues". Basic Books. Retrieved 2016-12-13.
  3. ^ a b c Steven Abrams. "Melotone Records 78rpm Discography". 78discography.com. Retrieved 2016-12-13.
  4. ^ Steven Abrams. "Decca Records 78rpm Discography, Page 1". 78discography.com. Retrieved 2016-12-13.
  5. ^ Steven Abrams. "Decca Records 78rpm Discography, Page 2". 78discography.com. Retrieved 2016-12-13.