Kiehnel and Elliott

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The architectural firm of Kiehnel and Elliot was established in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in 1906. The firm did substantial work in Florida, and moved to Miami in 1922.[1] From 1926, it was known as Kiehnel, Elliot and Chalfant.[2]

Richard Kiehnel (1870–1944) was the firm's senior partner. He was born in Germany and studied at the University of Breslau and the École nationale supérieure des Beaux-Arts in Paris. Kiehnel's first commission in the Miami area was in 1917 and he opened the firm's Miami office in 1922.[3] He supervised the construction of El Jardin, the earliest known Mediterranean Revival work remaining in Miami. Designing the mansion for John Bindley, President of the Pittsburgh Steel Company, Kiehnel departed from the Mission style that had only recently made its appearance in Florida and provided an elaborate antiquity for the house by using aging techniques to get the desired effect.[4][5] Kiehnel introduced Mediterranean Revival to Pinellas County through his designs of the Rolyat Hotel in Gulfport, Florida (now part of Stetson College of Law) and the Snell Arcade in St. Petersburg, Florida.

Kiehnel advanced to Art Moderne styling in the Carlyle Hotel on Miami Beach and the 1924 Scottish Rite Masonic Temple on the Miami River, the first Art Deco building in the area.[6] He also designed the Annie Russell Theatre, a Romanesque Revival building on the campus of Rollins College in Winter Park.

Kiehnel was active in his profession. He was a member of the Pittsburgh chapter of the American Institute of Architects since 1906 and a member of the national body from 1913. He was a charter member of the Florida South chapter and its president in 1930-1931[7] From 1935 to 1942 Kiehnel was the editor of Florida Architecture and Allied Arts magazine.

A number of Kiehnel's and the firm's works are listed on the U.S. National Register of Historic Places.[8][9]

Notable buildings[edit]

By year (with attribution indicated in parentheses):

And (not by year):

See also[edit]

Category:Kiehnel and Elliott buildings

References[edit]

Notes
  1. ^ "Kiehnel & Elliott: A Brief Survey of the Firm's Miami Projects". Learning from Miami. Retrieved February 27, 2018.
  2. ^ "Kiehnel and Elliott". Allegheny West. Retrieved February 27, 2018.
  3. ^ a b c d e Kiehnel 1938
  4. ^ Rodriguez 1982. p. 89
  5. ^ Patricios 1994. p. 177
  6. ^ a b Patricios 1994. p. 176
  7. ^ Kiehnel 1938.
  8. ^ a b c d e f g National Park Service (2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service.
  9. ^ Maria Tempkin (September 1988). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory-Nomination: Miami Shores Thematic Group".
  10. ^ Patricios 1994. p. 151
  11. ^ Dunlop 1996. p. 40.
  12. ^ Patricios 1994. p. 148
  13. ^ Patricios 1994. p. 165
  14. ^ Dunlop 1996. p. 92.
  15. ^ Patricios 1994. p. 198
  16. ^ Patricios 1994. p. 191
  17. ^ Rodriguez 1982. p. 208
  18. ^ Dunlop 1996. p. 30.
  19. ^ Rodriguez 1982. p. 155
  20. ^ Patricios 1994. p. 171
  21. ^ Patricios 1994. p. 206
  22. ^ City of Miami
  23. ^ a b Historical Museum
Bibliography
  • Dunlop, Beth. Miami: trends and traditions. New York: Monacelli Press, 1996. ISBN 1-885254-37-7
  • Kiehnel, Richard and Elliott, John M. A Monograph of the Florida Work of Kiehnel and Elliott. Miami, FL: Miami Post Publishing Company, 1938.
  • Patricios, Nicholas N. Building Marvelous Miami. Gainesville, FL: University Press of Florida, 1994. ISBN 0-8130-1299-6.
  • Rodriguez, Ivan A., editor. From Wilderness to Metropolis; the History and Architecture of Dade County (1825–1940). Miami, FL: Metropolitan Dade County, 1982. ISBN 0-916224-88-0.
  • Historical Museum of Southern Florida. "A Guide to Kiehnel and Elliott Architectural Drawings". Archived from the original on 23 April 2011. Retrieved 21 January 2011.
  • City of Miami. "Bryan Memorial Methodist Church" (PDF). Retrieved 6 April 2011.